Husband: Edward Griswold (1)
Born: 26 Jul 1607 in Marston, St. Lawrence, Northampton, Eng (2)
Married:
Died: 30 Aug 1691 in Killingworth, Middlesex, CT (3)
Father: George Griswold
Mother: Dousabel Leigh
Spouses:
Wife: Margaret (4)
Born:
Died:
Father:
Mother:
Spouses:
Children
01 (M): George Griswold (5)
Born: 19 May 1633 in Kenilworth, Warwick, England
Died: 03 Sep 1704 in Poquonock, CT
Spouses: Mary Holcomb
Additional Information

Edward Griswold:

Buried: Clinton Cemetery, Clinton, Middlesex, CT

Notes:

He was a member of the jury trying Rebecca and Nathaniel Greensmith for witchcraft; guilty.
He was on the Hartford jury in trial of John Carrington and wife for witchcraft; Guilty.


From "Horrocks, Philips, Winget, Keeler, Clark, Watson, Lockwood,
Strong, Gates and ancestors" posted on Ancestry.com

Contact: Lloyd A. Horrocks


" Name: Edward Griswold
Given Name: Edward
Surname: Griswold
Sex: M
Birth: 26 Jul 1607 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England
Christening: 26 Jul 1607 Wooten Wawen, Warwickshire, England
Death: 30 Aug 1691 in Kenilworth, Middlesex, Connecticut
Burial: Kenilworth, Middlesex, Connecticut
Note: Congregational Church Cemetery



Father: George Griswold
Mother: Dousabel Leigh b: 1576 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England

Marriage 1 Margaret b: Abt 1609 in , , England

Married: Abt 1628 in , Warwickshire, England 2 4
Change Date: 28 Apr 2001

Children

1. Francis Griswold b: Abt 1629 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England
2. Sarah Griswold b: 1631 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England
3. George Griswold b: 4 May 1633 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England
4. Sarah Griswold b: 1635 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England
5. Lydia Griswold b: 27 Mar 1637 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England
6. Ann Griswold b: in Windsor, Hartford Co., Connecticut
7. John Griswold b: 1642 in Windsor, Hartford Co., Connecticut
8. Mary Griswold b: 5 Oct 1644 in Simsbury, Hartford Co., Connecticut
9. Deborah Griswold
10. Joseph Griswold b: 22 Mar 1647 in Windsor, Hartford Co., Connecticut
11. Samuel Griswold b: 1649 in Windsor, Hartford Co., Connecticut
12. John Griswold b: 16 Aug 1652 in Windsor, Hartford Co., Connecticut


Marriage 2 Sarah Diamond b: 1632 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England

Married: 1672 in Windsor, Hartford Co., Connecticut


From Wayne Olsen:

From "The Gustin and Carlisle Genealogy", by Lester C. Gustin, 1954,Modern Press, Newton, MA:

Griswold is an ancient English surname derived from the name of a place, like a large portion of British patronymics. The ancient seat of family was at Solihull, Warwickshire, prior to the year 1400.
John Griswold about he middle of the 14th century came from Kenilworth and married a daughter and heiress of Henry Hughford, of Huddersley Hall at Solihull, and the family has been known as the Griswold of Kenilworth and Solihull. Solihull is on the northwest border of Warwickshire, and Yardley in Worchestershire on the south and west. It is but 8 miles from Kenilworth to the westward and 12 miles northwest of Stratford-on-Avon, and was a place of importance before the NormanConquest. The two American immigrants, Edward and Mathew came to CT from Kenilworth. Mathew came over in 1639 and settled at Windsor, CT; died at Lyme, CT, Sep 21, 1698 and was buried at Saybrook; assisted in the settlement of Lyme and was a large land-owner, was deputy to the general assembly in 1654 and afterward.
Edward came to CT at the time of the second visit of George Fenwick when many other settlers came. He was attorney for a Mr. St. Nicholas, of Warwickshire, who had a house built for him at Windsor and a tract of land impaled, as had also Sir Richard Saltonstall. There were many other prominent Puritans in Warwickshire intending to settle in the colonies, when a change in the political conditions in England caused them to stay there.
About Aug 17, 1639, Rev. Ephraim Huit arrived in Windsor, CT, with his company and immediately entered upon his labors assisting Rev. John Warham. Edward and Mathew Griswold were both of this company. Edward speedily became prominent in the affairs of the new community and was frequently mentioned in colonial records. He was deputy to the General Court, Aug 18, 1658 to Mar 14, 1660 and from May 15, 1662 to Mar 11, 1663. In 1659 he built the Old Fort at Springfield for Mr. Pynchon and also served as a Justice of the Peace. He was granted land at Poquonoc but did not remove there until after the title of the Indians had been fully extinguished in 1642. But he was a resident there in 1649, with two other families, those of John Bartlett and Thomas Holcomb. In 1663, with his son Jon, Edward removed to Hammonassett, later called Killingworth, now Clinton, CT, deeding to his sons George and Joseph, his Windsor property, reserving a small annuity. He was the most prominent man in the new settlement and when it was renamed, doubtless suggested the name Killingworth from Kenilworth Parish in England. He was first deputy to the General Court from Killingworth and magistrate and deputy thereafter for more than 20 years, 1662 to 1688-89, and was succeeded in office by his son John. The Colonial Records show him to have been an active and influential member of the legislature, accomplishing much good. At sessions he had the pleasure of meeting his own son Francis and brother Mathew in office, and there has hardly been a time since when the family has not been represented in the legislature of the province and state. In 1678, he was on the committee to establish a Latin School at New London; he was deacon of the Killingworth church and died in Killingworth in 1691, aged 84 years. His first wife Margaret died Aug 23, 1670 and he married second, in 1673, Sarah Bemis, widow of James Bemis, constable of New London, who died in 1665. She was the daughter of John and Rebecca (Bemis) Dimond. Edward had children all by his first wife, Margaret, the first 5 born in England, being baptized in Kenilworth Parish, the other born in Windsor, CT.

Listed in LDS Ancestral File, AFN; 1KLM-KL

From "The Griswold Family: The 1st 5 Generations in America", compiled and edited by Esther Griswold French, Robert Lewis French. Griswold Family Association, 1990.

Edward married c. 1628 Margaret (surname unknown) who was born c.1609, making her age 20 at the birth of her first child and 43 when her last child was born. Margaret died at Clinton, originally Killingworth, CT, Her gravestone marked "M.G. 1670" is the oldest stone in the cemetery behind the Congregational Church in Clinton. However it does not show the patient devotion nor the hardship endured in rearing her family in that vast wilderness.
When the Rev. Ephraim Huit arrived in Windsor, CT with his congregation about Aug 17, 1639 to assist the Rev. John Warham, Edward and Margaret Griswold, their 4 children (Francis, George, John and Sarah) and Edward's brother Matthew, were with the company. Mr. Huit had been pastor at Knowle and Wroxall, Warwickshire, England; Wroxall being a part of Kenilworth Parish. A writer of note upon religious subjects and a powerful preacher of the Puritan faith, he was censured for his non-conformity and silenced by the Bishop of Worcester. This no doubt was the cause of his moving to New England with the company he organized, of which both Edward and Matthew were members.
Edward speedily became prominent in the affairs of the new community and was frequently mentioned in colonial records. He served as Deputy to the General Court from Aug 18, 1658 - Mar 14, 1660 and again from May 15,1662 - Mar 11, 1663. In 1659 he was one of the men from Windsor to build the fort at Springfield for Mr. Pynchon. He also served as Justice of the Peace. Although he was granted land at Poquonoc he did not move there until after the title of the Indians had been fully extinguished in 1642. He was resident there in 1649 with two other families, John Bartlett and Thomas Holcomb. His home stood near the highway at the top of the hill, and contained 29 and a half acres bounded mostly south and west by Stony Brook and east by the river. His sons George and Joseph received the homestead when he moved to Hammonassett in 1663 with his son John and 2 daughters with their families.
The present Clinton, CT is the original Killingworth; Main street is the identical ground where the first settlers took their home lots. These were surveyed in 1663. Edward was one of the first settlers and doubtless suggested the name from Kenilworth parish in England. He was the most prominent man in the new settlement and must be given full credit for first organizing this community. He was its first deputy to the General Court. He, with his two sons-in-law, were recorded as freemen in 1669.
Edward was instrumental in organizing the first church and was its first deacon. He frequently served on important civil matters; his services, counsel and guidance evidently much sought. He also served on the committee to establish a Latin school at New London.
Ancient land records on file at the office of the Secretary of State, Hartford show land grants in favor of Edward: one of 200 acres; another of 100 acres given by the town of Killingworth. He showed the spirit of those early English settlers to accumulate large land holdings.
Edward married (2) Sarah Dimond Bemis, daughter of John and Rebecca (Bemis) Dimond and widow of James Bemis, constable of New London, who died in 1665.
Edward died in 1690 in his 84th year, his burial place being unknown, except it may be in the vacant space next to that of Margaret.

Bio also appears in "New England Families Genealogical and Memorials," compiled by W.R. Cutter, A.M. Lewis Hist. Pub. Co, New York, 1913.

From "The Phelps-Marshall Kinship", by Nancy S. McBride, McClure Printing Co., Vienna VA 1977:

Was born in England and died in Windsor, CT. Records of his parentage, birthplace, early life, and marriage have not been located. Edward and Margaret brought their English born children from Kenilworth to New England in 1639 in the company of bands of pilgrims under the Rev. Ephriam Huit and at first joined Edward's brother Matthew who had come over 9 years previously. Edward's family located in Windsor, CT where they remained until 1663 and where Edward was an attorney for a Mr. St.Nicholas. .... In 1650 he was on the Hartford jury in the trial of John Carrington and his wife for witchcraft which returned a verdict of guilty. In 1662 he was on a jury, trying Rebecca and Nathaniel Greensmith for the same offense with the same verdict. He was deputy to the general court in 1660.

(NOTE: REBECCA STEELE ELSON GREENSMITH - PROBABLE ANCESTOR OF DIANNE Z STEVENS)

Griswold was on a committee to procure the required number of settlers for a new town to be built on Hammonasett land west of the Indian River between New Haven and Saybrook. He named it Kenilworth after his English home, but it was soon corrupted to Killingsworth. His first settlement lay along the main road in the present town of Clinton. Edward organized the church there and was its first deacon. He held 100 acres as Kenilworth.

In 1669 Gov. Pynchon directed him to build the fort now known as Old Fort Springfield. Ft. Griswold, near Groton, named for this family was taken by storm by Arnold in the Revolutionary War.

Edward has married in England Margaret (Diamond?). The Griswold family holds information on research but had said that Margaret's maiden name had not been established from various possibilities. Mrs. Beal had submitted material searched for membership in the Society of Colonial Dames which give Margaret as dau. of John Diamond. Margaret died in 1670 and is buried in the old Indian River Cemetery. Her stone is the oldest there - a simple hand hewn granite shaft marked "M G 1670" There is an unmarked space on her left side (Edward's ?) and beyond that her youngest son John. ...


Source: Dawes-Gates (see Stephen Post, RIN 750) Edward Griswold and wife emigrated in
1639 as original founders to Windsor, CT.
They were founders of Norwich. They moved on to Hammonassett, then Killingworth, CT
(renamed Kenilworth, and now Clinton) in 1663. He was deputy to General Court for
Windsor from 1656 to 1660 and 1662 to 1663 and for Killingworth from 1667 to 1689. Source:
Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages, Vol 1, pp 158-159. He came to America with his
brother Matthew in 1639 with the party of Rev. Mr. Hull, who came to Windsor in that year.
They had a brother Thomas, who remained in Kenilworth, and the record of his marriage in
1634 is in the Kenilworth Church records, as well as the baptisms of some of Edward
Griswold's children and the burial of a daughter, but the ravages of the War of the Rebellion
destroyed traces there may have been of the emigrant brothers in Kenilworth. At the time of
his arrival in America, Edward Griswold was 32 years old and Matthew 19. It is known that
they were men of education and property and in the colonies were styled "Mr.," which then
meant gentleman as distinguished from yeoman or tradesman. The first location of Edward
Griswold in Windsor is uncertain, but he had a grant of land in Poquonock and went there in
1649. Here he established his home and became active in public affairs. In 1650 (or 1659)

He built the "Old Fort" at Springfield for Mr. Pynchon; in 1656 was deputy from Windsor to the
General Court and except for one session continued to represent the town until the charter
was received from King Charles. About 1663 Edward Griswold removed to Hommonoscett, a
new settlement near Saybrook. The new settlement became a town in 1667 and was called
Kenilworth, later Killingworth, and finally Clinton. Mr. Griswold was the first deputy from
Killingworth and served as its magistrate and representative for over 20 years, 1662-1678-89.
He was succeeded by his son John. He was often a commissioner and in 1678 was one of a
committee for establishing a Latin school in New London, and was the first deacon of the
Killingworth church. Edward Griswold died at Killingworth, it is said, in 1691, in his 84th
year. Edward Griswold married first in England, in 1630, Margaret, who died 8/23/1670, and
was buried at Clinton, CT. He married second, in 1672 or 1673, Mrs. Sarah Bemis, widow of
James Bemis, of New London. 11 children of first marriage.
His name is on the list of planters entered by the committee and he was recorded as freeman
in 1669. Edward was instrumental in organizing the first church and was its first deacon. He
frequently served on important civic matters. He served on the committee to establish a
Latin school at New London.
Ancient land records on file at the office of the Secretary of State in Hartford show land
grants in favor of Edward; one of 200 acres and one of 100 acres given by the town of
Killingworth. He was a large land holder showing the spirit of those English settlers to
accumulate large land holdings. Edward was granted land at Poquonoc but he did not move
there until after the title of the Indians had been fully cleared in 1642. His home stood near
the highway at the top of the hill. It had 20 and a half acres bounded mostly south and west
by Stony Brook and east by the river. His sons George and Joseph inherited the homestead.
TAG 40:176-179 deals with Griswold Ancestry in England, Genevieve Tvlee Kiepura. TAG 41
has "Further Griswold Notes" by John G. Hunt. Same author had a previous article in TAG
40:43?, states evidence that Margaret Blencow married a different Edward Griswold. p. 157,
Stiles. Came from England in 1639 with Rev. Mr. Huit [must be same as Hull]. He was
residing at Poq. in 1649 and had 29 1/2 acres. His sons George and Joseph inherited this
homestead.

He was a member of the jury trying Rebecca and Nathaniel Greensmith for witchcraft; guilty.
He was on the Hartford jury in trial of John Carrington and wife for witchcraft; Guilty.

Footnotes
  1. David M'Clure and Rev. Dr. Belkamp, Settlement and Antiquities of the Town of Windsor in Connecticut (June 20, 1797 in Collections of massachusettsHistorical Society, VOL V; p. 166-172).
  2. Olsen, Wayne, PAF file: Boslow_Anc_Stevens.paf (rec'd via EMail 0n 14 APR 2002).
  3. Ibid.
  4. Ibid.

    [See notes for husband Edward Griswold, b. 1607]

  5. Ibid.
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Revised: November 26, 2016