Husband: William Levi (1 2)
Born: 1737 in Hesse, Germany (3)
Married:
Died: in Sharon, CN (4)
Father:
Mother:
Spouses:
Wife: Abigail Tryon (5 6 7 8 9 10 11)
Born: 01 Jun 1754 in Sharon, Litchfield Co., CT (12)
Died:
Father: Oliver Tryon
Mother: Deborah Mudge
Spouses: Isaac Lamb
Children
01 (M): William A. Levi (13 14 15 16 17 18 19)
Born: about 1780 in Connecticut (20)
Died: 15 Dec 1860 in Paterson, Passaic Co., NJ
Spouses: Marregret Crain
02 (M): Oliver Levi (21 22 23 24 25 26)
Born: about 1797 in Sharon, Litchfield Co, CN
Died: 07 Oct 1868 in Poor house, Morris County, NJ (27)
Spouses: Mary DeMouth
03 (F): Mariah Levi (28 29 30 31 32 33)
Born: 28 Feb 1797 in Sharon, Litchfield, Connecticut
Died: 02 Dec 1877 in Charlestown, Calumet, WI (34)
Spouses: John Demouth
04 (M): John Levi (35 36 37 38)
Born: 1798 in Sharon, Litchfield Co, CN (39)
Died: 28 Jan 1841 in Sharon, Litchfield, Connecticut (40)
Spouses: Sarah Bailey
05 (F): Phoebe Levi (41 42)
Born: in Sharon, Litchfield Co, CN
Died:
Spouses:
06 (F): Betsy Levi (43 44 45 46 47 48 49)
Born: 01 Oct 1799 in of Sharon, Litchfield Co, CN
Died: 08 Sep 1887 in West Milford Twsp., Passaic Co., NJ (50)
Spouses: Thomas DeMouth
07 (F): Frances Levi (51 52)
Born: in Sharon, Litchfield Co, CN
Died:
Spouses:
08 (F): Elizabeth Levi (53 54)
Born: in Sharon, Litchfield Co, CN
Died:
Spouses:
09 (M): William Levi (55 56)
Born:
Died:
Spouses:
Additional Information

William Levi:

Notes:

Dear Sarah, Hannah, Timmy, and Becky,

Tonight I'm going to tell you about one of your ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War.

The William Levi Story by Granny Stevens

William Levi is one of our ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War. We know about William from three sources. We know about him through the Demouth Family History written by his great granddaughter May Webster. We know a little about him from a letter written by a great great granddaughter, Mrs. Charles O. Webber. And we know a very little about him from records of his family that have survived until now.

Here is the original story from May Webster

William Levi was born in Germany in 1737. At the age of thirty he was sold to the English army to fight against the colonists during the Revolutionary War. These Germans were Hessians. William being one of them. They were lured on board the battle-ships to see the interior. Then the gangplanks were lifted and the ships sailed away. William Levi hated the English and got out of fighting every opportunity. He would play off sick at their military drills, etc. One cold night when snow was on the ground he took off his shoes and tied them on his feet, heels front and toes of the shoes facing backwards so the British would think he had gone in the opposite direction! In a short time he safely reached the American lines. Levi was a miller and was following his trade when carried off to America.

After the Revolutionary War ended, he went back to his trade and married a girl by the name of Abigail Mudge who was of English descent. (Her name wasn't Mudge, but she was a descendant of a prominent Mudge family in Connecticut. More about her another time.)

There was an incident happened along about this time, no date to make sure when it happened, which shows our folks were in poverty. One dark night a wagon drove up which was loaded with barrels of flour being taken to the British soldiers. One barrel had rolled off and the head broken in. The driver went to the house where some of my folks lived and told them about the broken barrel and said he would give it to them, half or more was still in the barrel and clean. He would give them this barrel if they would remove every trace of the flour that was scattered, in other words, cover his trail. They studied a little. It was abetting and helping an enemy but their family was hungry and no harm could come of it probably, and they accepted the barrel of flour and covered the flour in the road with dust. It was the Colonists that must not know that the British were near. Such is war. (This story about the flour was probably about Abigail's family before she married William.)

Eight children were born to (William and Abigail Levi) as follows: William, Oliver, John, Phoebe, Mariah, Betsy, Frances and Elizabeth, twins who died in infancy. William Levi and Abigail his wife spent most of their lives near Sharon, Connecticut.

Here is the excerpt about him from Mrs. Webber's letter.

William Levi was a Hessian who deserted during the Revolutionary War and remained in America. He was crippled with one foot shorter than the other and a miller by trade.

Perhaps the fact that he was crippled in one foot explains how he could put his shoes on backwards and still walk. I always wondered about that. By the way, I have seen the story about walking backwards in the snow to get away from the British, without names, written in history text books.

One other thing we know about William is that after he deserted from the British during the Revolutionary War, he fought with the Colonists. There is a record book called Index to Revolutionary War Service Records by Virgil D. White. This book says that William Levy served as a private and a Matross in the 1st Artillery Regiment of the Continental Troops. It is possible this listing refers to a different William Levi. But he's probably our guy. Don't worry about the difference in spelling. People weren't too particular about spelling back in those days. Here is an explanation of "Matross" written by WL Ruffell.

The Matross

Matrosses first appeared on the establishment in 1639. They were Gunners' Assistants, ie the 'servitor Gunners' or 'inferior Gunners' of former years upgraded and given a more respectable title. Unlike their predecessors they were all on the same rate of pay, somewhat lower than the Gunner's. The word comes from the German matrossen meaning sailors because the tasks allotted them in action, ie traversing,loading, firing, sponging, manning dragropes, etc, were deemed to be sailors' work. They were less highly trained technically than Gunners. Matrosses were armed with muskets and bayonets, for their duties included guarding the guns and wagons on the march, and assisting when breakdowns occurred. Later they also took over from the Fusiliers the job of preventing the Drivers running away when the shooting started. (Until 1793 drivers were civilians.) In 1783 the rank of Matross was abolished, all serving Matrosses being elevated to the rank of Gunner. They had earned it, for their record was no less distinguished than that of Gunners.

And one more interesting thing - three of William and Abigail Levi's children married three of Jacob and Deborah Demouth's children.

Mariah Levi Married John Demouth

Betsy Levi Married Thomas Demouth

Oliver Levi Married Mary Demouth

Oh and one more thing. We think William was Jewish. He's our Jewish ancestor.

Now I will tell you how you are related to William. William's daughter Mariah had a son John Demouth. John Demouth had Jacob Demouth. Jacob Demouth had Sam Demouth. Sam DeMouth (He's the one who changed it to a capital "D") had a daughter Thelma. Thelma DeMouth married Forrest Zimmerman and had me (Dianne Irene Zimmerman). I married Paul Stevens (Grandpa) and had Dawne Irene Stevens. Dawne married Jason Pamplin and had Sarah, Hannah, Timmy, and Becky.

Love,
Granny

Abigail Tryon:

Notes:

The next person in our Mudge line is Abigail Tryon (b. 1 JUN 1754 Sharon Connecticut; d.?). Abigail married Isaac Lamb on 27 Dec 1772. It is believed Abigail and Isaac had several daughters. Isaac died as a soldier in the Revolutionary War on 19 SEP 1777 in the Battle of Saratoga.

The next we hear of Abigail, she is married to William Levi and having lots of babies in the late 1790's.
This seems strange to me. Here are the names and approximate dates of birth of William and Abigail Levi's children:


William A. Levi abt 1780
Oliver Levi abt 1797
Mariah Levi 28 Feb 1797
John Levi 1798
Phoebe Levi
Betsy Levi 1 Oct 1799
Frances and Elizabeth, twins who died in infancy
Willaim Levi (Or it may be we are confused and there is only one son, Willaim Levi.)

I find it hard to believe that a woman in her 40's would have all these babies so close together. Perhaps the Abigail Lamb who married William Levi was a daughter of Abigail Tryon Lamb. It would make more sense for a woman in her 20's to be having so many babies close together. If you look at the the family of Abigail's parents, Oliver Tryon and Deborah Mudge, you will see that the first daughter was named Deborah after her mother, one son was named Oliver after his father, and one son was named Ziba after his grandfather, Ziba Tryon. If Abigail Tryon grew up with siblings named after an earlier generation, she may well have wished to continue the tradition, especially if her parents died young, as we suspect they may have, by the record of her becoming the ward of Elnathan Goodrich. One son of Abigail's is named for her husband William, and one is named for her father Oliver. Abigail and her mother, Deborah, didn't rate namesakes. I am suggesting that the Abigail Lamb that married William Levi may have been the daughter of an Abigail Lamb who was the daughter of Abigail Tryon and Isaac Lamb. This relationship would make more sense from a fertility angle. On the other hand, William Levi was supposedly born around 1737 or 1747. He would have been in his 40's or 60's in the 1790's. Why would a girl in her 20's want to marry such an old man?

Another problem is the two sons, William Levi. William A Levi may have been from a previous marriage. Or it may be we are confused and there was only one son, William Levi.

Three of Abigail and Williams children married three siblings of the Jacob Demouth family form Morris County, New Jersey.

Oliver Levi married Mary Demouth
Mariah Levi married John Demouth (our ancestors)
Betsey Levi married Thomas Demouth

A fourth sibling, William A. Levi, Married the daughter of a neighbor and friend of Jacob Demouth, Abraham Crane.

So this is the end of our Mudge story and the prequel to our Demouth story. Our Mudges came to America very early in the colonial period. They were successful and prosperous builders of mills and surveyors of new towns. They participated in major ways in two of the big stories of our colonial era, Indian wars and witchcraft. One escaped the burning of Northfield, one's mother was hung as a witch, one lives to this day as a ghost at Mudge Pond.

Here's how we are related to our Mudges: Jarvis Mudge married Rebecca (the witch) and had Micah Mudge. Micah married Mary Alexander (from Scotland) and had Ebenezer (the ghost). Ebenezer married Abigail Skinner and had Deborah Mudge. Deborah married Oliver Tryon and had Abigail Tryon. Abigail married William Levi (the Hessian soldier) and had Mariah Levi. Mariah married John Demouth and had Jacob Demouth (who fought in the Civil War.) Jacob married Cordelia Martindale and had Samuel DeMouth (who fought in the Spanish-American War in the Philippines). Samuel married Elzora Pierce (and together with their children they practically starved to death on the prairie) and had Thelma DeMouth. Thelma DeMouth, the artist who painted L'Allegro, married Forrest Zimmerman and had Dianne. Dianne Zimmerman married Paul Stevens and had Dawne Stevens. Dawne married Jason Pamplin and had ... you wonderful children.!
So aren't you glad about the Mudges?

Love,
Granny





I found the following reference regarding an Isaac Lamb, Abigail his wife, and Job Mead in a book at WI State Historical Society. This Isaac lived in Amenia, NY, very close to Sharon, CT. However, it now appearss that this may have been a different Isaac Lamb. According to my correspondent, Mr. Layton, The Issac Lamb in Amenia was the son of William. Our Isaac Lamb was the son of Isaac Lamb. That Isaac Lamb died before 1790 according to FamilySearch. Right now (3/2012) I'm keeping my mind open.


31 Aug 2004:In response to a Query about the meaning of a finding re: Isaac Lamb's death reference

Intestate:Lamb, Isaac - Amenia, US Army soldier Date: 5/11/1792 To whom assigned: Abigail, his widow, renounced her rights and Job Mead, Amenia farmer (source: Dutchess Co., NY Probate Records 1787 - 1865; Register of Wills and letters Testamentary and of Administration in the Sur, Rhinebeck, NY 12572.)



I received the following: I have a book "United Presbyterian Church in Amenia: History 1748-1910" that I purchased when I was there last week, while researching for my FARR ancestors in Amenia. In the records, it has an Isaac Lamb in 1758, donating 8 L to the building of the Red Meeting House. There is also a David Lamb donating 1 L , Nathan Mead Jr 6 L, Eli Mead 1 L, and Joab Mead 4 L - 10 S. ( L= pounds S= shillings). There is no baptismal records for either of these families between 1749-1775. There were no baptism records at all for the church between 1775-1786. Job Mead is mentioned in 1794 and is refered to as Capt Job Mead, and serving on the church committee. The Church was staunchly Puritan up til 1788, when it began it's move to Presbyterian. In 1800, Capt Job Mead donated $16.25 towards repairs to the church, Job Mead Jr 3.25, Nathan Mead 3.00. I do not find any Lamb's at all. Capt Job seems as tho he is a prominant figure within the church, until his death in 1819. I do have a copy of the Old Amenia Cemetery, showing all the graves, and who is buried where. I do not find any Lamb's as being buried in this cemetery (that I can see). I do find Mead's. There are other cemeteries in the Amenia area tho. Now, as to the meaning of what you found. I am going to venture a good guess at it. There was a lot of curfuffle happening in the church for some time. Some had left and became members of the newly formed Baptist church in town, not agreeing with the ways and administration of the Amenia Church. The church council changed the terms of covenant several times over the years. Being a member, you were to be totally committed, financially as well as spiritually. The church was one of great strictness it seems, almost to a form of a dictatorship by the elders. One of a few things could be probable. a) When Isaac died, his wife Abigail renounced her rights to his ownings, as well as Job Mead, as a leader of the church, as to what the church should get. b) Isaac owed Job monies, which he chose not to collect, being Bretheren to Isaac. c) depending when it was probated, it could have been that Abigail would receive nothing if she should re-marry (possibly, Mead). I do find an "A. Mead" buried in the cemetery near Capt Job. The financial records I found as charts in the book. I will read more of the actual text, and see if I can find more about Isaac. Good Luck ...... Mark

Footnotes
  1. May Sommers, May Sommers personal family history of the DeMouths, Written for her children in 1936 (unpublished).
  2. norma@hcnews.com, Norma's Family (Ancestry.com 8/25/2001).
  3. Ibid.
  4. Ibid.
  5. Edna Kokanour, Kokanour Family Ancestors (Ancestry World Tree Project).
  6. May Sommers, May Sommers personal family history of the DeMouths, Written for her children in 1936 (unpublished).
  7. Kelly, Arthur C.M., Dutchess Co., NY Probate Records 1787 - 1865; Register of Wills and letters Testamentary and of Administration in the Sur (Rhinebeck, NY 12572), p. 64, item #95.
    (11 May 1792)

    Kelly, Arthur C.M., Dutchess Co., NY Probate Records 1787 - 1865; Register of Wills and letters Testamentary and of Administration in the Sur, Rhinebeck, NY 12572.
    "Intestate:Lamb, Isaac - Amenia, US Army soldier Date: 5/11/1792 To whom assigned: Abigail, his widow, renounced her rights and Job Mead, Amenia farmer"

  8. The Tryon Family in America, p.63.
  9. Letter from Mrs. Chas Webber to Mr. Alexander Fowler.
    (10 Aug 1949)
  10. Rootsweb.com - Dutchess Co, NY, Message Board, 31 Aug 2004.

    I have a book "United Presbyterian Church in Amenia: History 1748-1910" that I purchased when I was there last week, while researching for my FARR ancestors in Amenia. In the records, it has an Isaac Lamb in 1758, donating 8 L to the building of the Red Meeting House. There is also a David Lamb donating 1 L , Nathan Mead Jr 6 L, Eli Mead 1 L, and Joab Mead 4 L - 10 S. ( L= pounds S= shillings). There is no baptismal records for either of these families between 1749-1775. There were no baptism records at all for the church between 1775-1786. Job Mead is mentioned in 1794 and is refered to as Capt Job Mead, and serving on the church committee. The Church was staunchly Puritan up til 1788, when it began it's move to Presbyterian. In 1800, Capt Job Mead donated $16.25 towards repairs to the church, Job Mead Jr 3.25, Nathan Mead 3.00. I do not find any Lamb's at all. Capt Job seems as tho he is a prominant figure within the church, until his death in 1819. I do have a copy of the Old Amenia Cemetery, showing all the graves, and who is buried where. I do not find any Lamb's as being buried in this cemetery (that I can see). I do find Mead's. There are other cemeteries in the Amenia area tho. Now, as to the meaning of what you found. I am going to venture a good guess at it. There was a lot of curfuffle happening in the church for some time. Some had left and became members of the newly formed Baptist church in town, not agreeing with the ways and administration of the Amenia Church. The church council changed the terms of covenant several times over the years. Being a member, you were to be totally committed, financially as well as spiritually. The church was one of great strictness it seems, almost to a form of a dictatorship by the elders. One of a few things could be probable. a) When Isaac died, his wife Abigail renounced her rights to his ownings, as well as Job Mead, as a leader of the church, as to what the church should get. b) Isaac owed Job monies, which he chose not to collect, being Bretheren to Isaac. c) depending when it was probated, it could have been that Abigail would receive nothing if she should re-marry (possibly, Mead). I do find an "A. Mead" buried in the cemetery near Capt Job. The financial records I found as charts in the book. I will read more of the actual text, and see if I can find more about Isaac. Good Luck ...... Mark

    [posting by Mark Farr]

  11. Mudge, Alfred, Memorials: Being a Genealogical, Biographical and Historical Account of the Name of Mudge (Boston 1868), p.73.

    Probate Court held March 19, 1768, "Abigail Tryon, dau. of Oliver Tryon, late of Sharon, deceased, a minor, ae. 13 years on the first day of June last, made choice of Elnathan Goodrich as her guardian."

    [Elnathan Goodrich was the brother of the husband (David Goodrich) of Abigail's Mother's (Deborah's) sister Martha Mudge (b. 1720)]

  12. Ibid., p.73.

    "b. June 1, 1755,"

    [This source misstates Abigail's birth through an arithmetic error. It lists her birth as "b. June 1, 1755," But it also cites a probate court record from 3/19/1768 which says "Abigail Tryon...13 years on the first day of June last..."]

  13. Edna Kokanour, Kokanour Family Ancestors (Ancestry World Tree Project).
  14. May Sommers, May Sommers personal family history of the DeMouths, Written for her children in 1936 (unpublished).
  15. Ratables - 1816 - Pequannock Twsp, Morris County, NJ (State of NJ, Public Record Office).
  16. Census, Federal - 1820 - Orange co., NY, Blooming Grove, p. 304, roll m33_64.
  17. Census, Federal - 1830 - Bergen Co., NJ, Franklin.
  18. Census, Federal - 1850 - Bergen Co., NJ, Franklin, Image 448 Roll m432-442 ; p. 222 (Ancestry p. 42).
  19. Passaic County, New Jersey - Vol. AC - Marriages Deaths 1848 - 1867, p. 486.
  20. Census, Federal - 1850 - Bergen Co., NJ, Franklin, Image 448 Roll m432-442 ; p. 222 (Ancestry p. 42).
  21. Edna Kokanour, Kokanour Family Ancestors (Ancestry World Tree Project).
  22. May Sommers, May Sommers personal family history of the DeMouths, Written for her children in 1936 (unpublished).
  23. Burgey, George, Re: Oliver Levi (EMail dated 4JUN2002 from <Gcburgey@aol.com> to <diannestevens@charter.net>).
  24. Census, Federal - 1840 - Morris Co., NJ, Pequannock.
  25. Ratables - 1816 - Pequannock Twsp, Morris County, NJ (State of NJ, Public Record Office).

    [Oliver also appears in the 1817 Ratables]

  26. Census, Federal - 1850 - Morris Co, NJ, Pequannock Twsp - District # 15.
  27. Deaths in the Township of Hanover, County of Morris, State of New Jersey, from the 1st day of May1868 to the 1st day of M, Book AN p.135.
  28. May Sommers, May Sommers personal family history of the DeMouths, Written for her children in 1936 (unpublished).
  29. Census, Federal - 1870 - Calumet Co., WI, Charlestown twsp., p. 64 (Ancestry p. 4).
    (1 Jun 1870)
  30. Census, Federal - 1860 - Calumet Co., WI, Charlestown twsp, p. 129 (Ancestry p. 8 of 24).
    (27 Jul 1860)
  31. Letter from Mrs. Chas Webber to Mr. Alexander Fowler.
  32. Census, Federal - 1850 - Calumet Co., Wisconsin, District 36, Ancestry p. 30 of 42.
    (4 Sep 1850)
  33. M Celius (<celii@nwinfo.net>), email.


    MARIA DEMOUTH

    DIED – At the residence of her son-in-law, Jos. L. Barber, Esq., Charlestown, Wis., Dec. 2nd, 1877, Mrs. Maria Demouth, aged 80 years, 9 months and 4 days.

    Mrs. Demouth was born at Sharon, Conn., on the 28th day of February, 1797, and in early life moved with her parents to Morris Co., New Jersey, where she afterwards married John Demouth, the father of Samuel, Chaleon, James, Jacob, Mrs. Barber and Mrs. Bradley Webster, all formerly, well, and favorably known in this community. She came with her family to Wisconsin and settled at Elkhart Lake, in Sheboygan Co., in 1848 and early in 1850 removed to Hayton, this county, where she has since resided.

    Mrs. Demouth was a woman of many noble and generous qualities, strong in her likes and dislikes, yet charitable withal, firm in her convictions of right and steady in the pursuit of well doing. No person ever left her door in want if it was in her power to relive them and many's the time has she shared her last loaf with a hungry way worn traveler. Mrs. Demouth commanded the respect and admiration and regard of all the early settlers in Charlestown with most of whom she was personally acquainted and in her death the few remaining pioneers lose another link in the chain that formerly bound then together as one harmonious whole.

    "The year rolls round, and steals away
    The breath that first it gave;
    Whate'er we do, where'er we be,
    We're trav'ling to the grave."
    Chilton Times

    [article originally printed in Chilton Times]

  34. Obituary, From Chilton Times, Chilton, WI.

    [sent by M Celius]

  35. Edna Kokanour, Kokanour Family Ancestors (Ancestry World Tree Project).
  36. May Sommers, May Sommers personal family history of the DeMouths, Written for her children in 1936 (unpublished).
  37. Church of Jesus Christ of the latter Day Saints - Familysearch.com, film # 170414, p. 510.
  38. Edited by Hollis R. Bailey, Somerville, Mass, Bailey Genealogy, James, John, & Thomas & their Descendants in Three parts. (The Citizen Company, 1899).

    [From: "June Ferguson" <[EMail address deleted]> To: "Dianne Stevens" <[EMail address deleted]> Subject: Re: John Levi Date: Sat, 6 Jul 2002 14:49:40 -0700 X-Mailer: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2600.0000
    Hi,
    Here is my source:
    Bailey Genealogy, James, John, & Thomas & their Descendants in Three parts.
    Edited by Hollis R. Bailey, Somerville, Mass: The Citizen Company, 1899.
    My main line is the Baileys but I am always interested in the ancestors of
    the spouses also. I would love to have more information on John Levi's
    family and ancestors. If I upload it to the internet, someone may have the
    mother's name.
    Thanks,
    June]

  39. Church of Jesus Christ of the latter Day Saints - Familysearch.com, film # 170414 p. 510.

    [This source does not list father or mother only: "Relative - Lucretia W. Tyrrell]

  40. Burying Grounds of Sharon Connecticut, Amenia and Northeast New York (Amenia,NY 1903).

    John Levi died Jan 28 1841 in his 52nd year

  41. Edna Kokanour, Kokanour Family Ancestors (Ancestry World Tree Project).
  42. May Sommers, May Sommers personal family history of the DeMouths, Written for her children in 1936 (unpublished).
  43. Edna Kokanour, Kokanour Family Ancestors (Ancestry World Tree Project).
  44. May Sommers, May Sommers personal family history of the DeMouths, Written for her children in 1936 (unpublished).
  45. Hahn, Cheryl "The Hahn Family" <cldhahn@goes.com>, Ancestry Family tree of Cheryl Hahn.
  46. Crayon, Percy, Rockaway Records of Morris County NJ Families (Rockaway Publishing Company, Rockaway NJ: 1902).
  47. Census, Federal - 1880 - Passaic Co, NJ, West Milford Twsp, P. 346D.
  48. Census, Federal - 1860 - Passaic Co, NJ, W Milford, p.665; Ancestry p. 369.
  49. Census, Federal - 1870 - Passaic Co, NJ, West Milford Twsp, p.752; Ancestry p. 34.
  50. Elizabeth Demouth Death Certificate (State of New Jersey), D67.
    (9 Sep 1887)
  51. Edna Kokanour, Kokanour Family Ancestors (Ancestry World Tree Project).
  52. May Sommers, May Sommers personal family history of the DeMouths, Written for her children in 1936 (unpublished).
  53. Edna Kokanour, Kokanour Family Ancestors (Ancestry World Tree Project).
  54. May Sommers, May Sommers personal family history of the DeMouths, Written for her children in 1936 (unpublished).
  55. Census, Federal - 1830 - Morris Co., NJ, Pequanac Twsp.
  56. Census, Federal - 1840 - Morris Co., NJ, Pequannock, Ancestry p.3 of 20.

    [Ancestry.com images give the twsp. as "Randolph"]

Surnames | Index

Revised: November 26, 2016