Husband: Thomas Sawyer (1 2)
Born: Aug 1616 in Lincolnshire, England
Married:
Died: 12 Sep 1706 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
Father:
Mother:
Spouses:
Wife: Mary Prescott (3 4)
Born: 24 Feb 1630 in Hlifax, Yorkshire, England
Died: 12 Feb 1705 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
Father:
Mother:
Spouses:
Children
01 (M): Thomas Sawyer (5)
Born: 02 Jul 1649 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
Died: 05 Sep 1736 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts (6)
Spouses: Mary Rice
02 (M): Ephraim Sawyer (7 8)
Born: about 1651
Died: 10 Feb 1675/1676 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
Spouses:
03 (F): Elizabeth Sawyer (9)
Born: 05 Feb 1663 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
Died:
Spouses: James Hosmer
04 (F): Mary Sawyer (10)
Born: 04 Nov 1653 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
Died: 1711 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
Spouses: Nathaniel Wilder
Footnotes
  1. Almira Larkin White, Genealogy of the Descendants of John White of Wenham and Lancaster, Massachusetts. 1638-1900 (Haverhill, Mass., Chase Brothers Printers. 1900), p. 30.
  2. Ancestry.com, Jones Family Tree; glennoco1.
  3. John Blankenbaker, Germanna History (http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~george/johnsgermnotes/germhis1.html), p.30.
  4. Ancestry.com, Jones Family Tree; glennoco1.
  5. genealogylibrary.com, Genealogical and Personal Memoirs of Worcester County vol I/"My Link to the Past".

    (II) Thomas Sawyer, son of Thomas Sawyer (1), was born in Lancaster, Massachusetts, July 2, 1649, the first white child born there. His capture by the Indians forms one of the most familiar stories of the colonial period in Massachusetts. He was a man of fifty-five when the event took place, and was living in the garrison as described above. Queen Anne's war was making the lives of the colonists unsafe especially on the frontier. Indians made frequent attacks and massacred men, women and children. On October 16, 1705, Thomas Sawyer, Jr., his son Elias, and John Bigelow, of Marlboro, were at work in his saw mill when they were surprises and captured by Indians. The Indians took their captives back to Canada, and turned Bigelow and young Sawyer over to the French to ransom. The Indians kept the other Thomas Sawyer to put to death by torture. Sawyer proposed to the French governor that he should build a saw mill on the Chamblay river in consideration of saving his life from the Indians and giving the three captives their freedom. The French needed the mill and were glad of the opportunity. But the Indians had to be reckoned with. They insisted on burning Thomas Sawyer at the stake. They knew him and knew he was a brave man, not afraid of torture and death. The crafty French governor defeated their purpose by a resort to the church. When Sawyer was tied to the stake a French friar appeared with a key in his hand, and so terrible did he paint the tortures of purgatory, the key of which he told them he had in his hand ready to unlock, that they gave up their victim. Indians fear the unseen more than real dangers, and doubtless the friar took care not to specify just what he would do in case the auto-de-fe was carried on. Sawyer built the mill successfully, the first in Canada, it is said. He and Bigelow came home after seven or eight months of captivity. Elias Sawyer was kept a year longer to run the mill and teach others to run it. The captives were well treated after the French found them useful to them.

  6. Ancestry.com, Thompson Family Tree.
  7. Marvin, Abijah Perkins, History of the town of Lancaster, Massachusetts: from the first settlement to the present time, 1643-1879 (Internet Archive), p. 104.
  8. Early Records of Lancaster Massachusetts 1643-1725, The (1884; W. J. Coulter), p. 105.
  9. Almira Larkin White, Genealogy of the Descendants of John White of Wenham and Lancaster, Massachusetts. 1638-1900 (Haverhill, Mass., Chase Brothers Printers. 1900), p. 30.
  10. Ancestry.com.
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Revised: February 19, 2018