Husband: Edmund Rice, Deacon (1 2 3)
Born: about 1594 in Barkhamstead, Hertfordshire, England
Married: 01 Mar 1654/1655
Died: 03 May 1663 in Marlboro, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Father:
Mother:
Spouses: Tamazine Frost
Wife: Mercy Hurd (4)
Born: about 1613 in England
Died: 23 Dec 1693 in Marlboro, Middlesex, Massachusetts
Father:
Mother:
Spouses: Thomas Brigham
Additional Information

Edmund Rice, Deacon:

Notes:

From Wayne Olsen

From "Genealogical History of the Rice Family", by Andrew Hensaw Ward, Benjamin Richardson Publ., Boston, 1858:

Settled in Sudbury MA in 1638 or 1639; shared in the 3 divisions of land in Sudbury, the first of which was made in 1639. His residence was on the east side of Sudbury River, in the southerly part of what is now Wayland, and near the border of the extensive meadows through which that river flows.

No record found of his embarkation for America, nor on what ship or where he first arrived.

He was Selectman in 1644 and subsequent years; deacon of the churchin 1648.

His second wife was Mercie, wid. of Thomas Brigham of Cambridge.

11 children.

Edmund Rice was one of subjects studied in "Puritan Village: TheFormation of a New England Town", by Sumner Chilton Power, winner of the Pulitzer Prize in History 1964.

Bio in "History of Sudbury," by Alfred Serano Hudson, 1889, publ by town of Sudbury:

From "Bullard and Allied Families", by Edgar J. Bullard, Detroit, 1930:

...In 1638, Edmund Rice, with his wife and 7 children arrived in New England. The earliest record is his arrival in Boston, MA 1638.

From Edmund Rice Association website:

Twice in the 20th century nationally recognized research genealogists have attempted to determine the parents and ancestors of Edmund Rice. Mary Lovering Holman described the negative result of her search for records in the parishes near Stanstead and Sudbury, Suffolk County, England in "English Notes on Edmund Rice ? ", The American Genealogist, Volume 10 (1933/34), pp. 133 - 137. Mrs. Holman isconsidered by many to be one of the best research genealogists in the 20th century. In 1997 the Edmund Rice (1638) Association commissioned Dr. Joanna Martin, a nationally recognized research genealogist who lives in England only a few miles from Stanstead and Sudbury to search again for records of Edmund Rice's parents. Dr. Martin reported in 1999 that she found no record that identified Edmund's parents or ancestral line.
Several authors of published works and computer data sets have claimed names for Edmund Rice's parents. Regrettably they have not given sources that would assist in definitive genealogical research. For example, the Ancestral File and International Genealogical Index, two popular computer data sets widely distributed by the Church of JesusChrist of Latter Day Saints, offer parent candidates that include: Henry Rice and Margaret Baker, Henry Rice and Elizabeth Frost, Thomas Rice and Catherine Howard, and Thomas Rice and Elizabeth Frost.
From Mrs. Holman's paper we have an excellent record of one Henry Rice's marriage to Elizabeth Frost in November 1605 at Stanstead. Mrs.Holman also documents the baptism of Edmund's first child on 23 August 1619 at Stanstead. If this is the Henry Rice and Elizabeth Frost to which the LDS records refer, the LDS records must be erroneous. Our researchers have not been able to find records that support any Henry Rice and Elizabeth Frost, Henry Rice and Margaret Baker, Thomas Rice and Catherine Howard, or Thomas Rice and Elizabeth Frost as parents of Edmund Rice.
A scholarly investigation by Donald Lines Jacobus, considered by many as the dean of modern American genealogy, appeared in The AmericanGenealogist, Volume 11, (1936), pp. 14-21. Jacobus traced many of the false accounts to the book by Dr. Charles Elmer Rice entitled "By theName of Rice ? ", privately published by Dr. Rice at Alliance, Ohio in 1911.
Edmund Rice deposed in a court document on 3 April 1656 that he was about 62 years old. Sudbury, England includes three parishes, two of which do not have complete records for the years near 1594, which is Edmund's most likely birth year. Thus, if he were born in Sudbury, England his records have been lost and we may never know his origin.
In his address to the 1999 annual meeting of the Edmund Rice (1638 )Association, Gary Boyd Roberts, Senior Researcher, New England Historic Genealogy Society, reviewed all of the genealogical sleuthing on Edmund's parentage. Mr. Roberts is well known for his research on royal lineage. He concluded that there was no evidence whatsoever that supports the published accounts of Edmund Rice's parents and no evidence that Edmund Rice was from a royal lineage.
The Edmund Rice (1638) Association is very interested in proving theancestry of Edmund Rice. The association encourages anyone who can identify a primary source that names Edmund and his parents to identify that source. Records of a baptism, estate probate, or land transaction naming Edmund and his parents are the most likely records to contain that proof. Until someone can cite such a record, the association must state emphatically that Edmund Rice's parents and ancestry are not known and that Edmund Rice's descendants can not claim royal ancestry.

Who was Edmund Rice?

(Return to ERA main page)
Edmund Rice arrived in the Massachusetts Bay Colony about 1638. Our first record of his presence is in Township Book of the Town of Sudbury in the year 1639. Regrettably, no ship's passenger list has survived and we have no record of Edmund Rice and his family before 1639 so we can not be certain when or where he and his family arrived in the New World.
Knowing the names of Edmund Rice's children at Sudbury, family historians have traced his family back to England using church baptismal records for his children and, eventually, to his marriage to Thomasine Frost on 15 October 1618 at Bury St. Edmunds. However, we have found no record of his baptism or any other record that names his parents. Read more about the search for Edmund Rice's ancestry on another of these pages.
As yeomen farmers Edmund Rice and the other early settlers at Sudbury were well prepared for the tasks of forming and governing a new community. As yeomen they had assumed with both personal and community responsibilities back in England. As Protestant churchmen they had been encouraged to read and write so that they could study and understand their Bible. Although not of the noble class, they had shared many community and church responsibilities in their former communities in England.
Edmund Rice was one of the prominent leaders of his community at both Sudbury and Marlborough. In his Pulitzer Prize winning book, PuritanVillage, The formation of a New England Town, Sumner Chilton Powell sums up the high regard that his fellow citizens had for Edmund: "Not only did Rice become the largest individual landholder in Sudbury, but he represented his new town in the Massachusetts legislature for five years and devoted at least eleven of his last fifteen years to serving as selectman and judge of small causes." and "Two generations of Sudbury men selected Edmund Rice repeatedly as one of their leaders, with the full realization that they were ignoring men of far more English government experience who had come with him." If your ancestry goes back to Sudbury, be sure to read Powell's superb account of the development of this New England town in the mid 17th century.
Although much respected by his fellow townsmen, Edmund seems to have had an independent side to his nature. In 1656 Edmund Rice and others petitioned the Massachusetts General Court for a new town which became the City of Marlborough. Edmund moved his immediate family and was elected a Selectman at Marlborough in 1657. Later generations of Rices were founding members of many new communities, first in New England and Nova Scotia, and later across the United States and Canada.
Like many early New England families, Edmund Rice's family was a very large one. Of his twelve children, ten survived to have children of their own. Edmund Rice's descendants through his great great grandchildren number nearly 1,450. This pattern of large families seems to have continued well into the 19th century. The result is that many living people can trace their ancestry to Edmund Rice.

From the Marlboro website:

EDMUND RICE, born about 1594, came from Barkhamstead, Hertfordshire, England, and settled in Sudbury in 1639. He was a prominent man in Sudbury; was one of the selectmen, or townsmen, as they were frequently denominated, and was one of the Deacons of the Church. He was honored with several appointments by the General Court, and was denominated therein "Goodman Rice." He was appointed to solemnize marriages in Marlborough, and enjoyed the confidence of his fellow citizens in both towns. He was one of the petitioners for the grant which was afterwards made the town of Marlborough, and moved to the place.
His wife Tamazine, died in Sudbury, June 13, 1654, and he married March 1, 1655 as a 2d wife, Merrie (Mary Brigham), widow of Thomas Brigham, the ancestor of the numerous Brighams which afterwards settled at Marlborough. He married Mercie, March 1, 1655, and died at Marlborough May 3, 1663, and was buried at Sudbury. His widow married 1664, William Hunt, of Marlborough, an early settler of Concord. He died at Marlborough, 1667, and his widow died December 28, 1693. Edmund Rice came to Marlborough soon after the grant of the township, and took up his abode on what is known as the "great road," on the northerly side of the Pond, not far from the Williams Tavern. We have no record of the birth of his children, and cannot set them down in chronological order.


Much of "Puritan Village, The Formation of a New England Town" is about Edmund Rice and his differences with Peter Noyes in creating the town of Sudbury. Author is Sumner Chilton Powell, Publ by Wesleyan Univ. Press,Hanover, NH, 1963. Won Pulitzer Prize for History in 1964.

Footnotes
  1. Olsen, Wayne, PAF file: Boslow_Anc_Stevens.paf (rec'd via EMail 0n 14 APR 2002).
  2. Sumner Chilton Powell, Puritan Village: The Formation of a New England Town (Wesleyan Univ. Press, Hanover, NH,1963).

    [Much of "Puritan Village, The Formation of a New England Town" is about Edmund Rice and his differences with Peter Noyes in creating the town of Sudbury. ]

  3. Edmund Rice Association Website (http://www.edmund-rice.org/edmund.htm).

    Who was Edmund Rice?

    Edmund Rice arrived in the Massachusetts Bay Colony about 1638. Our first record of his presence is in Township Book of the Town of Sudburyin the year 1639. Regrettably, no ship's passenger list has survived and we have no record of Edmund Rice and his family before 1639 so we can not be certain when or where he and his family arrived in the New World.
    Knowing the names of Edmund Rice's children at Sudbury, family historians have traced his family back to England using church baptismal records for his children and, eventually, to his marriage to Thomasine Frost on 15 October 1618 at Bury St. Edmunds. However, we have found no record of his baptism or any other record that names his parents. Read more about the search for Edmund Rice's ancestry on another of these pages.
    As yeomen farmers Edmund Rice and the other early settlers at Sudbury were well prepared for the tasks of forming and governing a new community. As yeomen they had assumed with both personal and community responsibilities back in England. As Protestant churchmen they had been encouraged to read and write so that they could study and understand their Bible. Although not of the noble class, they had shared many community and church responsibilities in their former communities inEngland.
    Edmund Rice was one of the prominent leaders of his community at both Sudbury and Marlborough. In his Pulitzer Prize winning book, PuritanVillage, The formation of a New England Town, Sumner Chilton Powell sums up the high regard that his fellow citizens had for Edmund: "Not only did Rice become the largest individual landholder in Sudbury, but he represented his new town in the Massachusetts legislature for five years and devoted at least eleven of his last fifteen years to serving asselectman and judge of small causes." and "Two generations of Sudbury men selected Edmund Rice repeatedly as one of their leaders, with the full realization that they were ignoring men of far more English government experience who had come with him." If your ancestry goes back to Sudbury, be sure to read Powell's superb account of the development of this NewEngland town in the mid 17th century.
    Although much respected by his fellow townsmen, Edmund seems to have had an independent side to his nature. In 1656 Edmund Rice and others petitioned the Massachusetts General Court for a new town which became the City of Marlborough. Edmund moved his immediate family and was elected a Selectman at Marlborough in 1657. Later generations of Rices were founding members of many new communities, first in New England and Nova Scotia, and later across the United States and Canada.
    Like many early New England families, Edmund Rice's family was a very large one. Of his twelve children, ten survived to have children of their own. Edmund Rice's descendants through his great great grandchildren number nearly 1,450. This pattern of large families seems to have continued well into the 19th century. The result is that many living people can trace their ancestry to Edmund Rice.

  4. Olsen, Wayne, PAF/Boslow_Anc_Stevens.
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