Husband: Micah Mudge (1 2 3)
Born: 1650 in New London, New London, Connecticut
Married: 23 Sep 1670 in Northhampton, Mass (9 10)
Died: Jan 1723/1724 in Hebron, Tolland, Connecticut
Father: Jarvis Mudge
Mother: Rebecca Steele
Spouses:
Wife: Mary Alexander (4)
Born: 20 Oct 1648 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut
Died: 1728 in Hebron, Tolland, Connecticut
Father: George Alexander
Mother: Suzanne Sage, Savage
Spouses:
Children
01 (M): Ebenezer Mudge (5 6)
Born: 26 Feb 1683 in Northhampton, Hampshire, MA (7)
Died: 21 Apr 1758 in Sharon, Litchfield Co, CT (8)
Spouses: Abigail Skinner
Additional Information

Micah Mudge:

Notes:

Micah Mudge (b. 1650 New London, Connecticut; d.Jan 1723/24 Hebron, CT) That 1723/24 business puzzled me for awhile. The year is written that way because, for a long time, people thought the year started on March 25 instead of on January 1. In England, March 25 was called Lady Day commemorated "The Annunciation of the (Blessed) Virgin Mary". It is also approximately the date of the spring equinox. So when we look at an old date in January, February or March, and then the year 1723/24, for instance, at the time the record was made they called the year 1723, but we would actually consider that year to be 1724 using todays system.

It must have been a horrible frightening experience for Micah and Moses when their mother and step-father were hung. Perhaps they were taken in by other Mudge or Steele relatives. Micah became an educated person and a surveyor. And as the colonies kept growing surveyors were always in demand.

Micah married (Mary Alexander b. 1848 Windsor, CT; d. 1728 Hebron, CT.) on 23 Sep 1670 in Northampton, Massachusetts. Mary's father, George Alexander, had been one of the founders of Northampton. Together, Micah and Mary, had nine children, two sons and seven daughters.

Here is a description of the early married life Micah and Mary must have experienced in Northampton from James Trumbull's History of Northampton, Massachusetts: From its Settlement in 1654, Vol. I, Chapter 22, p. 284-288:

Their houses, nearly all built of logs, were but scantily furnished, and contained little beyond the bare necessities of life. Their flocks and herds supplemented what the soil provided, and the nimble fingers of the housewife, and her daughters, manufactured the fabric, as well as the garments that clothed the family. They lived quiet and contented lives, attending two services at the meeting house on Sundays, and town meetings regularly on week days, at least most of them did, as often as the business of the community demanded attention. Their food was coarse but nutritious. Corn and wheat and rye were the staple at every meal; meat was abundant, pork, beef, mutton, wild game and fish, were plenty; potatoes were unknown, but turnips, cabbages, beans and a few other vegetables, were used to a considerable extent.

Wheat bread was in more common use at that time than in after years. "Rye and Indian" bread, consisting of one part rye and two parts Indian meal, came into use when wheat became scarce, and it's popularity continued well into the present century. (1800's). The first settlers learned from the Indians the use of cornmeal, which made its appearance on the table at nearly every repast. It came in the shape of hasty pudding, as corn cake, as boiled Indian pudding, and sometimes as samp and hominy. Succotash, beans boiled with corn in the milk, was another dish derived form the Indians, which is still welcomed everywhere. Bread and milk were much used, especially among the younger portion of the family, and bread and cider were substituted when milk was wanting.

...The pioneers of Northampton were many of them blessed with large families. Some of them had ten, twelve, fifteen, and seventeen children. Twenty-five among those who came here within the first ten years of settlement, had three hundred thirty children born to them. Many of their sons became themselves heads of families, and grants of land were made to them. When new towns were projected at Northfield and Deerfield, many of these young men were among the original settlers. The older citizens of Northampton became the corporators or "engagers" in them, their sons occupied the home lots and established political and religious institutions therein. Of the first petitioners of Northfield, all but three were citizens of Northampton; ten Northampton names are found upon the early records of the town of Deerfield, and one-third of the householders there in 1675 (when it was burned) had been residents of this town. Very few of the older inhabitants of Northampton removed permanently to these new settlements.

Micah was among those from Northampton who in 1671 bought land from the Indians in northern,Massachusetts. and built a village called Northfield. Micah did the surveying. His name is on two deeds related to the founding of Northfield.

But the Indians weren’t satisfied! In 1675 they burned the village and all the residents and their families had to leave. This uprising of the Indians was part of what was called King Philips War. I found a wonderful description of the burning or Northfield by Irwin Goodwin in an website called, "Genealogical Gleanings." Here it is:

On 2 September 1675. the settlers of Northfield, MA were pursuing their normal routine. Tales of attacks by the Indians had filled the long summer and Northfield had appealed for more soldiers from the military garrison at Hadley (a larger town 25 miles to the east), but no soldiers had yet arrived.

Shots suddenly rang out and the women and children ran for safety in the fort. The men, harvesting grain in the meadow were caught by surprise and eight were killed. Cattle were slaughtered and grain destroyed and a few buildings were burned. The survivors huddled inside the fort, listening to the gunshots and the attackers' yells and the cattle's moans.
Fortunately, Hadley was sending troops to Northfield and a troop of 38 soldiers under the command of Captain Robert Beers was enroute. When the soldiers were four miles from Northfield, they decided to stop for the night and early the next morning the soldiers continued their travel on foot, leaving the horses with an armed guard.
Suddenly they were ambushed and 22 soldiers, including Captain Beers were killed. The survivors returned to Hadley to sound the alarm.
On 5 Sept 1675, a relief troop of 100 soldiers rushed to Northfield with orders to accompany the settlers to the safety of Hadley. Under some protest, the settlers agreed to leave their crops and cattle behind and seek the security of the fort at Hadley. Following their departure, the Indians burned the village of Northfield, which King Philip used over the next several months as a rendezvous with other river tribes.

Hadley itself was attacked and was saved by a man with a white beard and flowing hair, some said was an angel from heaven but later it was discovered that it was regicide Goffe, one of those men responsible for the death of the father of Charles II
You can read more about King Philip's War in the story about our ancestor, John Browne. He was one of your Grandpa Stevens ancestors on the Stevens line.
We don't know if Micah was actually living there when the Indians burned Northfield. All Micah's and Mary's children are said to have been born in Northampton during the 1670's and 80's. Many people who survived the Indian attacks went to Northampton, Hadley, or Hatfield. Here is some more from James Trumbull describing the situation in the Massachusetts portion of the Connecticut River valley after King Philip's War:
"During the fall and winter of the year 1675, the condition of affairs in the valley must have been discouraging, and it is not strange that the commander-in-chief felt compelled to place the county partially at least, under martial law. The future was dark and unpropitious, and there seemed to be no immediate prospect of relief. Hadley, Hatfield and Northampton were all that remained of the northern settlements. To describe the situation in one of them portrays the condition of all. Equally harassed, none escaped the peculiar trials and perplexities of the times, and though some suffered in a less degree, all were grievously burdened. In addition to the hardships attendant upon the war (King Philip's War), winter set in with more than ordinary severity. The cold was intense, snow fell in unusual quantities, rendering communication with other towns very difficult, and some of the time quite impossible.

Northampton was not a frontier town and had not,like the others, sustained and concerted attack by the Indians. Yet her citizens had enlisted in the various expeditions and numbers of them had been killed; others had been slain within sight of their own firesides; many houses and barns had been burned; the town was filled with soldiers billeted upon the inhabitants; fugitives from the abandoned towns sought protection here, and could not be denied; the meadows had been only partially planted; the slender harvest following an interrupted seed time, could not be wholly gathered; much of the hay and grain stored in the barns had been destroyed; and altogether the outlook was most discouraging. Many of the inhabitants had furnished provisions and other material aid in carrying on the war, and were compelled to wait years for repayment. The loss of so many buildings and barns and such quantities of hay and grain, proved a serious obstacle to the keeping of stock which had greatly accumulated, and it became quite a problem how to subsist the cattle and horses. Supplementary to the drain of supporting an increased population, came the burden of war taxes. ..."

In 1682 Micah and his family were able to return to Northfield and resettle the town. A deed was signed by Micah and two others, Cornelius Merry and John Lyman, paying the Indians an additional 12 pounds. There is no date on this particular deed, but it says, "This is to be in addition to the am't paid in the Original Grant, bearing date of the year 1671." This may be a transaction at the time of resettlement. We can't be sure. Then there is the following document which is particularly interesting:

*Order from the General Courte of Boston, dated May 24, 1682
The Towne Book of Squakeheag orNorthfield, Where in is Recorded the names of ye petitioners for the PlantationWith the Grants and Acts of the General Court about . . . . With the Deeds from the Indions and the orders of the Comitey with the consent of the Proprietors Which Have taken upp Land there With the Grants and rerescript of every mans Land.
The names of those that presented their Names to Major Pinchon to bee presented to the Honored Gen Couret who engaged to doe yr indeuer to atend the conditions of ye grant
Elder John Strong Isark Shelden
Joseph Parsons Sen'r Matthewe Clessen
Samuel Wright Sen'r Joshuah Pummery
Joseph Dirkinson John Alexander
George Alexander Cornelius Merry
Thomas Bascomb William Smead
Robert Liman Richard Weller
Thomas Roote Sen'r John Kilburne of Wethersfield
William Jeanes John Hilleor
William Hubbard Micah Mudg
Nathaniel Phelps Sen'r Ralph Hutchison
William Miller Sen'r."

Of these 23 'proprietors' (meaning original settlers who were granted land), besides Micah, four, plus Major Pynchon, are our direct ancestors. Here's how, briefly:

Major John Pynchon, Samuel Wright, Nathaniel Phelps, and Isaac Sheldon are ancestors of Paul Stevens through the Derrick line. George Alexander was the father of Micah's wife, Mary. John Alexander was George's brother, not our direct ancestor.

Toward the end of the century, Micah's surveying skills were called for to help lay out the town of Lebanon, Connecticut. It astounds me, the amount of traveling these colonists did. From Northfield in northwestern Massachusetts to Lebanon in east central Connecticut is well over a hundred miles as the crow flies. And yet this was at least the third major move Micah made with his family, with horse and wagon and over wagon tracks. We know Micah was in Lebanon before 1698. He helped lay out the town, and was a land trader. There are many records of his purchases and sales of land in early Lebanon records. He was also one of the founders of the First Congregational Church, and his wife, Mary, was the first female member. She was the only female member between 1702 and 1707. Another record shows he kept a tavern .

Sometime before September 1717 Micah moved his family again, this time only about eight miles west, to Hebron, Connecticut. he and his sons built and ran a mill there on the road to Colchester. At that time Micah and Mary had four grown children still living with them; their two sons, Moses and Ebenezzer, and two daughters, Thankful and Susanna. Their daughters, Mary and Elizabeth, had married and stayed in Northampton. Their daughters Sarah and Abigail were married and settled in Windsor, Connecticut.

Micah died in January of 1723/24. He left a will naming his wife, all his sons, daughters and grandchildren. His estate inventory is interesting reading. It and his will may be found in the book , Mudge, Alfred, Memorials: Being a Genealogical, Biographical and Historical Account of the Name of Mudge, Boston 1868 It itemized all his possessions and their monetary value in 1724. He owned several books which are enumerated. This was at a time when books were rare. And he signed his name to his will.




Micah Mudge (1650-ca 1724) helped lay out the town of Lebanon, Connecticut and in 1700 he and his wife Mary Alexander were among the founders of the First Congregational Church of Lebanon. Prior to the move to Lebanon, Micah had been a surveyor and proprietor at Northampton, Massachusetts. The misfortune of Micah's life, and a sad story even today, was that in 1664, his mother, Rebecca and her third husband Nathaniel Greensmith were hanged as witches in Hartford, Connecticut. Rebecca's surname is not known but she was married first to Abraham Elston by whom she had two or three daughters, then to Jarvis Mudge, by whom she had two sons, and then to Nathaniel Greensmith. Micah was only fourteen when his mother was killed. from http://www.joycetice.com/families/infra.htm

Footnotes
  1. contact: Olive Holt, Layton/Holt Genealogy.
  2. contact: Lisa Gorman, New England Witch Trial Lines, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=witchtrials&id=I1316.

    Micah & Mary appear to have been among the original settlers of Northfield, Mass., but the indians burnt their village and drove them off in 1675, as they were dissatisfied with the amount of the original payment in 1671. A deed was signed by Micah Mudge and two others on behalf of the settlers in 1682 paying the indians additional monies where upon they were allowed to resettle Northfield. There were twenty-three signatures including those of George & John Alexander & Micah Mudge on the application filed with the General Court of Boston for the formation of the Northfield plantation.He moved to Lebanon, Conn. about 1679 and having had some experience as a surveyor assisted in laying out the town and was granted land at various times which appears to have totaled one hundred and twenty acres or more. In 1705 he sold one hundred acres to Joseph Tilden (his son-in-law) for eight pounds. Micah was one of the nine persons who organized the First Congregational Church in 1700. His wife was the only female until 1707.In 1717 he sold thirty acres of land for one hundred and fifty-five pounds. He seems to have bought and sold land for speculation. He moved to Hebron, CT. in the fall of 1717 where he stayed until his death in 1724.

  3. Mudge, Alfred, Memorials: Being a Genealogical, Biographical and Historical Account of the Name of Mudge (Boston 1868), p.34.

    After the death of his father in 1653, his mother removed from New London to Wethersfield, Conn., where they lived, and where, probably, the mother died. The first record of him appears on the town books of Northampton, Mass., where he marries Mary Alexander, Sept. 23, 1670. Northampton was settled in 1654, and George Alexander, the father of Mary, was one of the original proprietors. Here Micah Mudge resided and acte as a surveyor, and appears to have been one of the original proprietors of Northfield, Mass., the settlement of which was attended with great difficulties, as the Indians burnt the village and drove off the settlers in 1675. He returned with others afterwards, as appears from an order from the General Court, dated Boston, May 24,1682,* and became an actual settler.

    *Order from the General Courte of Boston, dated May 24, 1682
    The Towne Book of Squakeheag orNorthfield, Where in is Recorded the names of ye petitioners for the PlantationWith the Grants and Acts of the General Court about . . . . With the Deeds from the Indions and the orders of the Comitey with the consent of the Proprietors Which Have taken upp Land there With the Grants and rerescript of every mans Land.
    The names of those that presented their Names to Major Pinchon to bee presented to the Honored Gen Couret who engaged to doe yr indeuer to atend the conditions of ye grant
    Elder John Strong Isark Shelden
    Joseph Parsons Sen'r Matthewe Clessen
    Samuel Wright Sen'r Joshuah Pummery
    Joseph Dirkinson John Alexander
    George Alexander Cornelius Merry
    Thomas Bascomb William Smead
    Robert Liman Richard Weller
    Thomas Roote Sen'r John Kilburne of Wethersfield
    William Jeanes John Hilleor
    William Hubbard Micah Mudg
    Nathaniel Phelps Sen'r Ralph Hutchison
    William Miller Sen'r

    [The grant of Northfield, MA]

  4. John Alexander an Email from Allan Meyer to Ellen Baker on 8 Dec 2000.
  5. FunwithFamilyHistory (https://funwithfamilyhistory.files.wordpress.com).

    [https://funwithfamilyhistory.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/0747-chapter7-book-of-leonard-gurley.pdf is the title of the Ebenezer Mudge excerpt]

  6. Mudge, Alfred, Memorials: Being a Genealogical, Biographical and Historical Account of the Name of Mudge (Boston 1868).
  7. Mudge, David C. of Burlington, NJ, Mudge Research notes.
  8. Ibid.
  9. John Alexander an Email from Allan Meyer to Ellen Baker on 8 Dec 2000.
  10. Ancestry.com, Massachusetts Town and Vital Records 1620-1988.

    Name: Mary Alexander
    Event Type: Marriage
    Marriage Date: 23 Sep 1670
    Marriage Place: Northampton, Massachusetts
    Spouse Name: Micah Mudge

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Revised: November 26, 2016