Husband: John Dethick, the second (1 2 3)
Born: 10 Mar 1719 in Colchester, New London Co., CT
Married: 22 Dec 1740 (23)
Died: 09 Jun 1793 in Montville, New London Co., CT
Father: John Dethick, the First
Mother: Susan Ransom
Spouses: >>>
Wife: Anna Dodge (4 5)
Born: 16 Dec 1722 in Montville, New London, CT
Died: before 1770 in Montville, CT (6)
Father: John Dodge
Mother: Elizabeth Stebbins
Spouses:
Children
01 (F): Hopestill Dethick (7)
Born: 26 Nov 1742 in Colchester, New London Co., CT
Died:
Spouses:
02 (F): Anna Dethick (8)
Born: 25 Mar 1744 in Colchester, New London Co., CT
Died: 22 Aug 1750 in Colchester, New London, CT (9)
Spouses:
03 (F): Susannah Dethick (10)
Born: 28 Mar 1746 in Colchester, New London Co., CT
Died: 19 Aug 1750 in Colchester, New London Co., CT
Spouses:
04 (M): Peter Dethick (11)
Born: 13 Jan 1748 in Colchester, New London Co., CT
Died: 22 Aug 1750 in Colchester, New London, CT
Spouses:
05 (M): Ananias Dethick (12 13)
Born: 18 Jan 1750 in Colchester, New London, CT
Died: 05 Nov 1827 in Warren, Litchfield, CT
Spouses: Mary Ann Welch; Tryphena Skinner
06 (F): Elizabeth Dethick (14)
Born: 15 Feb 1752 in Colchester, New London Co., CT
Died: 17 Oct 1756 in Colchester, New London, CT
Spouses:
07 (M): John Dethick, the Third (15 16)
Born: 18 Jul 1754 in Colchester, New London, CT
Died: 11 Jun 1811 in Richfield Springs, NY
Spouses: Mary Harris
08 (M): Ephraim Derrick (17 18 19 20)
Born: 21 Apr 1756 in Colchester, New London, CT (21)
Died: 27 Sep 1832 in Clarence Hollow, Erie Co., NY
Spouses: Anna Dodge; Elizabeth Gustin
09 (F): Mary Dethick (22)
Born: 09 Aug 1758 in Colchester, New London Co., CT
Died: 13 Apr 1765 in Colchester, New London, CT
Spouses:
Additional Information

John Dethick, the second:

Notes:

28 Nov 2009

Dear Children.

Tonight I will tell you the story of

John Derrick (Dethick) the Second
1719 – 1793
and
Anna Dodge (1722 - 1770)

John Derrick the Second was the first child of John Derrick the First and his wife, Susan Ransom John II was born on March 10, 1719 in Colchester, Connecticut. At that time the last name was spelled Dethick, or Dirthick, or Dethock, or Dathick, or Deathic. The surviving descendants of John spell it either Derrick, as we do, or Derthick. You may wonder at this. Didn't they know how to spell their own name? As a matter of fact we know that this John did not know how to spell his own name. We know this because researchers have found legal documents pertaining to him and instead of signing his name he just wrote “X.” In those times most people could not read or write. One thing about it, he didn't have to waste time on paperwork! Just think! If he had been able to write your Uncle Danny's name might be Daniel Dethick Stevens. I like Daniel Derrick better, don't you? What's in a name. John the 2nd's son, Ananias Dethick, became a preacher and his congregation called him, “Old Deathhook!”

John married Ann (or Anna) Dodge in December of 1741 at Montville, Connecticut. Ann was born in 1722, the daughter of John and Elizabeth Stebbins Dodge. Her Dodge ancestors were among the earliest settlers of Block Island, Rhode Island and were fisherpeople. Her grandfather Israel Dodge resettled the family near Colchester, Connenticut in about 1694. Ann died before 1770, living less than fifty years. After reading the next paragraph you may feel that perhaps she died of sorrow.

John and Ann did not have very good luck with their children. Their first baby, Hopestill, born 1742, probably died in infancy as she's never mentioned again. Then they had Anna in 1744, Susanna in 1746, and Peter in 1748. In the summer of 1750 in the space of four days all three children died! There were frequent epidemics in those days. We don't know what those children died from, but it was probably something that you have gotten shots for. Back then people's idea about germs and disease were quite primitive, as were the available treatments. John and Ann had had another baby in January of that year, Ananias, (Old Deathhook!). He survived. Next they had Elizabeth in 1752 who lived to be 4 and ½, John III in 1854, and Ephraim, our ancestor, in 1756. Both John III and Ephraim lived nice long lives. Last came Mary in 1758, but she only lived to be 6 and ½. So out of nine children, five girls and four boys, only three boys survived to adulthood.

John II lived most of his life as a subsistence farmer. A subsistence farmer, one who raised enough to feed his family and very little more, needed about 50 to 60 acres of land with an additional 20 acres of woods to supply fuel. Most farmers owned a team of oxen which supplied the power for plowing and hauling and stump clearing. They usually also had a cow or two, a few pigs, and sheep. The sheep were necessary for their wool which was spun into yarn for clothing. Very few people had any money. Most transactions were done by barter.

The following description of life during John II's time in his part of Connecticut comes from the “History of Montville” by Henry Baker.
“On a visit to one of these yeomen we pass along a 'trail' indicated by marked trees, and first discover his horse and cattle shed standing near an old Indian clearing, which may have been a planting field of the chief of the tribe; and just a little way off stands the dwelling built of logs, with a thatched roof and a large chimney at one side built of stones cemented with clay. The small windows are covered with oil paper, and the the massive door is thick enough to be bullet-proof. At one end of the house, at a distance of about ten feet, is a well, from which water is obtained by means of a crotched tree set in the ground, supporting a large 'sweep' balanced in the middle, upon the small end of which is fastened a pole reaching down to near the ground. On the lower end hangs 'The Old Oaken Bucket.'

“Pulling the 'latch string' of the door, we enter and find that the floors are made of rifted chestnut or straight-grained oak, roughly smoothed with the adze, while the immense hearth in front of the large fireplace occupying nearly one-half the side of the house, is of large flat stones. There are no partition walls, but thick curtains made of homemade cloth, are hung so that at night they divide off their straw beds, upon which they pile rugs, coverlets, and flannel or linen sheets. A high-backed chair or two, a massive table, a large chest with carved front, and some Indian birch-bark boxes and splint baskets are ranged round the walls, while on a large dresser we notice wooden bowls and trenchers, pewter plates and earthen plates, horn drinking cups, and a 'tinder box' with flint and steel. Hanging on the wall is the old 'flint lock' ready for defense or to shoot down wild beasts that may be prowling around the flocks.

“In one corner is the spinning wheel and loom, at which the housewife is busily engaged when the meals are disposed of and dishes washed and set upon the shelf.. High on the mantel shelf with a candle-stand on one side and the time-marking hourglass on the other is the oft-read Bible, never kept for show.”

John II was a soldier in the French and Indian War. When, as a result of this war, the English conquered French Canada they rewarded many colonists who had fought for them with land. Do you remember the story of Jonathan Higgins and Rachel Doane? Just like Jonathan and Rachel, John Dethick received a grant of land in Nova Scotia for his services as a soldier. He was given 500 acres of land in the town of Horton, Kings County, Nova Scotia. There is evidence that he did go to Horton for a while but, unlike the Higgins, John didn't stay in Nova Scotia. He moved back to Connecticut. He died June 9, 1793 at Montville.

Here's what little we know about John II's surviving children:

Ananias, born in 1750 at Colchester, CT, had two wives and ten children, all but one of which grew to adulthood. He became a Baptist preacher.

John III was born in 1754. He and his brother Ephraim fought in the Revolutionary War. After the War he moved with his family to Richfield, New York. He and his wife, Mary Harris, had 9 children.

Ephraim was born April 21, 1756. He is our ancestor and has his own story.

So this is the story of John Derrick II and Anna Dodge, colonial subsistence farmer and wife. They worked long and hard just to feed and clothe their family. They saw six of their nine children die before reaching the age of seven. Then Anna died before reaching the age of fifty. John II fought in the French and Indian War. He had a chance to be a pioneer in Nova Scotia and turned it down. He saw two sons return whole from the Revolutionary War.

Here's how we're related to John and Anna Dodge Derrick (Dethick) II: John and Anna Derrick had Ephraim Derrick. Ephraim and Elizabeth Gustin Derrick had Rodolphus Derrick. Rodolphus and Lorinda Sheldon Derrick had Franklin H. Derrick. Franklin H. and Harriet Boslow Derrick had Mary Derrick. Mary Derrick and John Balis had Flora Balis. Flora Balis and Edmund Stevens had Harold Stevens. Harold and Helen White Stevens had Paul Stevens. Paul and Dianne Zimmerman Stevens had Dawne Stevens. Dawne Stevens and Jason Pamplin had Sarah, Hannah, Timmy, and Becky!

So Hooray for John Derrick Dethick II!!!

Love,
Granny

Footnotes
  1. Frank D. Walker, Derrick Family History (Wheeler, TX - 22 FEB 1957).
  2. Olsen, Wayne, PAF file: Boslow_Anc_Stevens.paf (rec'd via EMail 0n 14 APR 2002).
  3. Jack Taif Spencer and Robert Abraham Goodpasture, Genealogy and History of the Derthicks and Related Derricks, Eight Centuries of the Derthicks and Related Derricks... (Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore, 1986).

    Father John Derick born 1719; married Ana Dodge - 3 sons and 1 daughter; by second marriage had 2 sons and 5 daughters.

    Family moved to Colchester,.. three generations living there, and with eldest living so long (100 or 108), land records on other town records hard to sort out.

    1750 Colchester-Salem land maps show Deathick and Holmes farms in close proximity.

    Quoted from Ephraim Derrick's diary, " John Derick the second was born in the year of our Lord 1719. He married Ana Dodge and by her he had 3 sons and one daughter. He lived to be 79 years old and his sons names were Annanias and John and Ephraim. Annanias the oldest was born 1751. He married Maryan Welch. By her he had 7 children, 2 sons and 5 daughters.The sons names were Turner and James. "

    The first 4 children of John Dethick and Ann Dodge were born between 1742 and 1748. Hopestill was born 26 Nov 1742. There is no further record of her life, so there is the assumption that she died in infancy. In the summer of 1750, a great tragedy seemed to strike the family. In the spaceof 4 days, 3 of the children died in quick succession. We have no information regarding the cause for the sudden demise of 3 of the 5 Dethick children. Presumably it was an epidemic of some nature which was all too frequent in this early period when the nature of disease was little understood.

    John Dethick was the one son to survive to adulthood, his younger brother Ananias having either died early or possibly left America (to theWest Indies?) since there is nothing known of him other than his birthdate. From his father, John was the beneficiary of all the land and most of the property . To what extent this was a large advantage remains uncertain because of the extremely great longevity of John Sr. In fact, John(2) lived only 11 years after the death of his father in 1782. However, one might surmise that because of his father's advanced age, perhaps John (2) was utilizing his father's land long before the latter's death.

    Sometimes the land records of Colchester and adjacent towns are difficult to interpret because of the presence in certain years of John, his son, and his grandson with identical first names. However it seems clear that John (2) owned some land in the nearby town of Montville as well as in the area on the south side of Colchester (the old Salem parish). He sold land to Amos Ransom of Colchester in 1755. Author noted the large number of Ransoms who were living in the Colchester-Salem area in 1755.

    John Dethick signed the oath of loyalty to the new government on 8 Jul 1780, in Colchester. He was a "Tythingman" in 1784. By 1790, he was listed as a resident of Montville. Actually, his wife Ann Dodge, whom he married in 1741, was a native of Montville.

    Perhaps the most significant factor in the life of John Dethick was his participation as a soldier in the French and Indian Wars and his subsequent residence in Nova Scotia for some years before the Revolutionary War. It appears that he left Nova Scotia and returned to CT before the outbreak of the War. ... He was among the list of 200 CT men who received original grants in the township of Horton, Nova Scotia - he received one share, or 500 acres.

  4. Frank D. Walker, Derrick Family History (Wheeler, TX - 22 FEB 1957).
  5. <Matunes@compfun.net>, Three1252 (Ancestry.com).
  6. Olsen, Wayne, PAF file: Boslow_Anc_Stevens.paf (rec'd via EMail 0n 14 APR 2002).
  7. <Matunes@compfun.net>, Three1252 (Ancestry.com).
  8. Ibid.
  9. Jack Taif Spencer and Robert Abraham Goodpasture, Genealogy and History of the Derthicks and Related Derricks, Eight Centuries of the Derthicks and Related Derricks... (Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore, 1986).
  10. <Matunes@compfun.net>, Three1252 (Ancestry.com).
  11. Ibid.
  12. Frank D. Walker, Derrick Family History (Wheeler, TX - 22 FEB 1957).
  13. Jack Taif Spencer and Robert Abraham Goodpasture, Genealogy and History of the Derthicks and Related Derricks, Eight Centuries of the Derthicks and Related Derricks... (Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore, 1986).
  14. Ibid.
  15. Frank D. Walker, Derrick Family History (Wheeler, TX - 22 FEB 1957).
  16. Jack Taif Spencer and Robert Abraham Goodpasture, Genealogy and History of the Derthicks and Related Derricks, Eight Centuries of the Derthicks and Related Derricks... (Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore, 1986).
  17. Frank D. Walker, Derrick Family History (Wheeler, TX - 22 FEB 1957).
  18. Daughters of the American Revolution, Rolls of Honor (Ancestor Index), Vol 29, p. 225.
  19. Jack Taif Spencer and Robert Abraham Goodpasture, Genealogy and History of the Derthicks and Related Derricks, Eight Centuries of the Derthicks and Related Derricks... (Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore, 1986).
  20. Olsen, Wayne, PAF file: Boslow_Anc_Stevens.paf (rec'd via EMail 0n 14 APR 2002).
  21. Olsen, Wayne, Ephraim Derrick (Email dated 1 JUL 2002).

    I'm 99.9% positive that Ephraim was born in Colchester CT (the site of their
    homestead is now in Salem township), but I don't have a primary record to
    prove it. A primary record - church record, town record - may exist, but
    once I had the Spencer and Goodpasture book on the Dethick/Derrick family
    genealogy, I didn't search any further. The book doesn't cite a specific
    church or town record for births, but states that much of the first 4
    generations of the Dethicks/Derricks is documented by Ephraim Derrick's
    diaries/writings and family bible.

  22. Jack Taif Spencer and Robert Abraham Goodpasture, Genealogy and History of the Derthicks and Related Derricks, Eight Centuries of the Derthicks and Related Derricks... (Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore, 1986).
  23. <Matunes@compfun.net>, Three1252 (Ancestry.com).
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Revised: November 26, 2016