Husband: William Sheldon (1 2)
Born: 19 Sep 1766 in Sheffield, Berkshire, MA
Married: 29 Apr 1784 in Sheffield, Berkshire, MA
Died: about 1841 in NY
Father: William Sheldon
Mother: Hannah Noble
Spouses:
Wife: Diadama Saxton (3 4)
Born: 05 Apr 1767 in Sheffield, Berkshire, MA
Died: 1838 in Erie, NY
Father: Jasper Saxton, LT
Mother: Martha Keyes
Spouses:
Children
01 (M): Ezekiel Sheldon (5)
Born: 14 Aug 1786 in Sheffield, Berkshire, MA
Died: 12 Jul 1826
Spouses:
02 (F): Loretta Sheldon (6)
Born: 27 Jan 1788 in Sheffield, Berkshire, MA
Died:
Spouses:
03 (M): Frederick Sheldon (7)
Born: 12 Sep 1790 in Sheffield, Berkshire, MA
Died:
Spouses:
04 (M): Justin Sheldon (8)
Born: 28 Jun 1792 in Sheffield, Berkshire, MA
Died:
Spouses:
05 (M): Nathaniel Sheldon (9)
Born: 12 May 1794 in Sheffield, Berkshire, MA
Died:
Spouses:
06 (F): Lorinda Sheldon (10 11 12 13 14 15)
Born: 14 Feb 1797 in Clarence, Erie, NY
Died: 14 Jan 1874 in Monroe, Green, WI
Spouses: Rodolphus Donaldus Derrick
07 (M): Daniel Sheldon (16)
Born: 16 Mar 1799 in Clarence Hollow, Erie Co., NY
Died: 05 Nov 1847
Spouses:
08 (F): Elizabeth Sheldon (17)
Born: 17 Jan 1801 in Clarence Hollow, Erie Co., NY
Died:
Spouses:
09 (M): Jasper Saxton Sheldon (18)
Born: 22 Jan 1803 in Clarence Hollow, Erie Co., NY
Died:
Spouses:
10 (?): Carydon Sheldon
Born: 11 Mar 1805 in Clarence Hollow, Erie Co., NY
Died: 21 Jan 1829
Spouses:
11 (F): Elvira Sheldon (19)
Born: 19 Nov 1807 in Clarence Hollow, Erie Co., NY
Died:
Spouses: Hickman
Additional Information

William Sheldon:

Notes:

Per Wayne Olson:

Listed in "History and Genealogy of the Family of Thomas Noble", compiledby Lucius M. Boltwood and printed privately. Birth year listed as 1765.

From "Genealogy and History of the Derthicks and Related Derricks", By Spencer and Goodpasture. Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore, 1986:

Says there is a record of Dr. William Sheldon in Clarence in early 1800's (by children's birth dates, as early as 1797) and may have been the one who purchased land in 1803. Had son named William.

According to Commemorative Biographical Record of the Counties of Rock,Green, Grant, and Lafayette", J.H. Beers, Co., Chicago, 1901: William Sheldon was a farmer in New York, and reached the age of 75.

From Judy Cain, who posted land purchase info onsearches.rootsweb.com/usgenweb/archives/ny/deeds/holland.txt.
Info from "Pioneer History of the Holland Purchase of Western New York by O. Turner, published in 1850. Reports 1803 purchase of land from Holland parcel by William Sheldon, Township 11, Range 6. Intro to website indicates that the book contains much more than the simple listing.. "There is information of genealogical value about some of the family names mentioned in the list..." No Derrick or Sexton or Saxton listed through 1807.

Footnotes
  1. Olsen, Wayne, Sheldon Family Line, The (Received via EMail 12 APR 2002).
  2. Olsen, Wayne, PAF file: Boslow_Anc_Stevens.paf (rec'd via EMail 0n 14 APR 2002).
  3. Olsen, Wayne, Sheldon Family Line, The (Received via EMail 12 APR 2002).
  4. Olsen, Wayne, PAF file: Boslow_Anc_Stevens.paf (rec'd via EMail 0n 14 APR 2002).
  5. Olsen, Wayne, Sheldon Family Line, The (Received via EMail 12 APR 2002).
  6. Ibid.
  7. Ibid.
  8. Ibid.
  9. Ibid.
  10. Frank D. Walker, Derrick Family History (Wheeler, TX - 22 FEB 1957).
  11. Census, Federal - 1850 - Green Co., Wi, town of Spring Grove, Ancestry p. 15.
  12. Jack Taif Spencer and Robert Abraham Goodpasture, Genealogy and History of the Derthicks and Related Derricks, Eight Centuries of the Derthicks and Related Derricks... (Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore, 1986), 477-480.

    The original cabin built by Rodolphus and Loranda (Sheldon) Derrick at Spring Grove, Green County, Wisconsin, is clearly described by a granddaughter, Ida L. Klumb of Olympia, Washington. Ida wrote this article in 1927.

    He was born August 8, 1793 and died September 29, 1860. She was born February 14, 1797 and died January 14, 1873. The house was made of logs and partitioned off,,, into two rooms. The north end of the lower part was used for a kitchen-dining room and a sitting room. The south end was used for sleeping quarters and a play room for the children. There was only one door and two windows in each of these rooms. The bedsteads were wooden and home made, with high posts on each comer in which curtains were fastened to make them private. A hallway ran between these two rooms and one door on the east and one on the west. Steps behind the east door led to the upper story in which there were two rooms with partitions made of logs.

    As there was no sawmill in those times, the floors were made of puncheons which were logs split and smoothed on one side with an adze. The rough side was laid next to the ground. There was a large fireplace on the north side of the kitchen. Here, Loranda did all of the everyday cooking by hanging pots on a rod over the fire. Big tongs were used to set beside the chimney to be used when the fire needed replenishing. Pot hooks and cranes were tools used in handling the cooking utensils in these times. The baking was all done in a big brick oven built in the north comer of the kitchen. Loranda baked the most delicious salt-rising bread, pumpkin and mince pies, and baked beans at various times, usually twice per week.

    After 77 years of time has passed, one of the grandchildren (Ida Boslow Klumb) is giving this description. She was born in this same log house in the year 1850 in the northeast comer room on the upper floor. It was known as the "Old Abby". All of the buildings on the homestead were constructed of logs and they consisted of corncrib, barns, chicken houses, hen coops, carpenter shop, sheds, and a smoke house. She remembers the smoke house very vividly as it used to be filled with meat every fall. The meat was smoked and cured for winter use. The carpenter shop was very much used by Rodolphus, who was a handy workman with carpenter tools.

    The only kind of chairs used in the Abby in the year 1840 and some years later, were splint bottom chairs. They were all homemade. One chair in particular, I remember. It was a big rocking chair with splint bottom and back. These splints came from the inside bark of elm trees, arched and cut into proper lengths, then woven back and forth until the bottom of the chair would be covered. Frames of the chair, back legs and rounds, were fashioned from small limbs of walnut trees which were very plentiful. The rocking chair mentioned above was very substantial and was used for many, many years. It was still in the possession of Loranda Derrick at her death in 1873. The chair served many purposes, being used for a cradle for many of the grandchildren as well as a rest chair for the elderly. I well remember seeing Grandma sitting in it at the window that looked out on the yard. Beside the window was a rose bush and in June it was loaded with large pink roses. Grandma would sit by the window with her knitting work - a pretty sight, dressed in her white cap and neckerchief, a costume worn by all elderly women at that time.

    Lamps were not known in the home. For lighting the old log cabin, pine nuts and tallow candles were used. Grandma used to make up very large quantities, hundreds of dozens of them every fall. They were burned in candlesticks and had snuffers to snap the wicks. The brass candle sticks had to be cleaned and candles renewed every morning.

    Besides doing the work and cooking, Grandma made clothes for all the family by taking the wool from. the sheep, cleaning and carding it, spinning it into yam and then weaving it into cloth. All this was done with homemade utensils such as the spinning wheel, reels, and looms. In 1860, the spinning wheel Was still in the garret of the old home. After all this work to get the cloth, the clothing for every member of the family was made by hand sewing. Sewing machines had not been put into use at this time. Stockings were all hand knitted from yam which had been home spun. Even the shoes were all hand cobbled from home-tanned leather.

    All the joys and comforts of a home were of crude form compared with the present. For drinking purposes, gourds were mainly used. They were formed by cutting off one side, digging out the center, and then put them through a drying process. As a result, they became very hard, serviceable, and durable. They had a long neck used as a handle. A hole was made in the end through which a home­spun string was run and the gourd was hung by the old stone well for a drinking cup. Many of these improvised dippers were kept about the house for various purposes.

    Besides the homemade splint bottom chairs, there were wooden cradles for the babies made of walnut wood. Bookcases and all cupboards used in the Abby were made of wood from the farm. One of the bookcases did service until 1873 and later.

    All soap used was home processed. First, they had to get the lye by making a sort of rack or bin to hold ashes and when this became full, water was poured on to the ashes until it was thoroughly saturated. After a short time, the water having penetrated all through the ashes, it would trickle out into a trough. This lye was used to cut the grease in making soap. The soap was made in big iron kettles placed over an outdoor fire. Large quantities were made and stored in a big log room used only -for this purpose.

    [The original cabin built by Rodolphus and Loranda (Sheldon) Derrick at Spring Grove, Green County, Wisconsin, is clearly described by a granddaughter, Ida L. Klumb of Olympia, Washington. Ida wrote the article quoted in this source in 1927.

    He was born August 8, 1793 and died September 29, 1860. She was born February 14, 1797 and died January 14, 1873. The house was made of logs and partitioned off,,, into two rooms. The north end of the lower part was used for a kitchen-dining room and a sitting room. The south end was used for sleeping quarters and a play room for the children. There was only one door and two windows in each of these rooms. The bedsteads were wooden and home made, with high posts on each comer in which curtains were fastened to make them private. A hallway ran between these two rooms and one door on the east and one on the west. Steps behind the east door led to the upper story in which there were two rooms with partitions made of logs.

    As there was no sawmill in those times, the floors were made of puncheons which were logs split and smoothed on one side with an adze. The rough side was laid next to the ground. There was a large fireplace on the north side of the kitchen. Here, Loranda did all of the everyday cooking by hanging pots on a rod over the fire. Big tongs were used to set beside the chimney to be used when the fire needed replenishing. Pot hooks and cranes were tools used in handling the cooking utensils in these times. The baking was all done in a big brick oven built in the north comer of the kitchen. Loranda baked the most delicious salt-rising bread, pumpkin and mince pies, and baked beans at various times, usually twice per week.

    After 77 years of time has passed, one of the grandchildren (Ida Boslow Klumb) is giving this description. She was born in this same log house in the year 1850 in the northeast comer room on the upper floor. It was known as the "Old Abby". All of the buildings on the homestead were constructed of logs and they consisted of corncrib, barns, chicken houses, hen coops, carpenter shop, sheds, and a smoke house. She remembers the smoke house very vividly as it used to be filled with meat every fall. The meat was smoked and cured for winter use. The carpenter shop was very much used by Rodolphus, who was a handy workman with carpenter tools.

    The only kind of chairs used in the Abby in the year 1840 and some years later, were splint bottom chairs. They were all homemade. One chair in particular, I remember. It was a big rocking chair with splint bottom and back. These splints came from the inside bark of elm trees, arched and cut into proper lengths, then woven back and forth until the bottom of the chair would be covered. Frames of the chair, back legs and rounds, were fashioned from small limbs of walnut trees which were very plentiful. The rocking chair mentioned above was very substantial and was used for many, many years. It was still in the possession of Loranda Derrick at her death in 1873. The chair served many purposes, being used for a cradle for many of the grandchildren as well as a rest chair for the elderly. I well remember seeing Grandma sitting in it at the window that looked out on the yard. Beside the window was a rose bush and in June it was loaded with large pink roses. Grandma would sit by the window with her knitting work - a pretty sight, dressed in her white cap and neckerchief, a costume worn by all elderly women at that time.

    Lamps were not known in the home. For lighting the old log cabin, pine nuts and tallow candles were used. Grandma used to make up very large quantities, hundreds of dozens of them every fall. They were burned in candlesticks and had snuffers to snap the wicks. The brass candle sticks had to be cleaned and candles renewed every morning.

    Besides doing the work and cooking, Grandma made clothes for all the family by taking the wool from. the sheep, cleaning and carding it, spinning it into yam and then weaving it into cloth. All this was done with homemade utensils such as the spinning wheel, reels, and looms. In 1860, the spinning wheel Was still in the garret of the old home. After all this work to get the cloth, the clothing for every member of the family was made by hand sewing. Sewing machines had not been put into use at this time. Stockings were all hand knitted from yam which had been home spun. Even the shoes were all hand cobbled from home-tanned leather.

    All the joys and comforts of a home were of crude form compared with the present. For drinking purposes, gourds were mainly used. They were formed by cutting off one side, digging out the center, and then put them through a drying process. As a result, they became very hard, serviceable, and durable. They had a long neck used as a handle. A hole was made in the end through which a home­spun string was run and the gourd was hung by the old stone well for a drinking cup. Many of these improvised dippers were kept about the house for various purposes.

    Besides the homemade splint bottom chairs, there were wooden cradles for the babies made of walnut wood. Bookcases and all cupboards used in the Abby were made of wood from the farm. One of the bookcases did service until 1873 and later.

    All soap used Was home processed. First, they had to get the lye by making a sort of rack or bin to hold ashes and when this became full, water was poured on to the ashes until it was thoroughly saturated. After a short time, the water having penetrated all through the ashes, it would trickle out into a trough. This lye was used to cut the grease in making soap. The soap was made in big iron kettles placed over an outdoor fire. Large quantities were made and stored in a big log room used only -for this purpose.
    ]

  13. History of Green County, Wisconsin - 1884.
  14. Census, Federal - 1870 - GreenCo., Wisconsin, Spring Grove.

    Line 30 Dwelling # 148 Household # 148

    Derrick, F.H. age 46 farmer Real Estate = $15,000 b. NY
    Harriet 48 Canada
    Theodore 22 farmer WI
    Frank 20 in school WI
    Mary 17 in school WI
    Levi 15 in school WI
    Harriet 13 in school WI
    Peter 8 in school WI
    Lorinda 78 NY

  15. Census, Federal - 1860 - Green, WI, Spring Grove, p. 5 of 5.

    Line 34 1511 35

    RD Derrick age 66 farmer b. NY
    Neeranda " 63
    Scott Duory 10 WI

  16. Olsen, Wayne, Sheldon Family Line, The (Received via EMail 12 APR 2002).
  17. Ibid.
  18. Ibid.
  19. Ibid.
Surnames | Index

Revised: November 26, 2016