Husband: Jacob Demouth-Themout (1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14)
Born: 1680 in Hoogwyzel, Darmstad, Germany (15)
Married: 1735
Died: in Colony of New Jersey
Father:
Mother:
Spouses: Anna Elizabetha Febers; Barbara Thewalt
Wife: Barbar Parleman (16)
Born:
Died:
Father:
Mother:
Spouses:
Additional Information

Jacob Demouth-Themout:

Notes:

Adkins familytree posted on Ancestry.com lists Jacob's death as 1736 in Rockaway Valley, Morris, NJ. I do not know what her source is for this info.



Some place Hoogwyzel in Holland. All the people I've known whose names begin 'Hoo' have been of Durch origin.

January 31, 2006

Dear Children,

Tonight I want to tell you about the first Demouth ancestor that we know anything about. He was

Jacob Demouth
(16xx - 17xx)

Our immigrant DeMouth ancestor was Jacob who came to America in about 1710. I have discovered there are several very different ideas about Jacob's background.Many sources say Jacob was a French Huguenot. The Huguenots were French Protestants, members of the reformed church founded by John Calvin in the year 1550. France was a very Catholic country. Since Huguenots did not believe they needed the church to intercede between the individual Christian and God, the Catholic church did not like Huguenots and therefore the government of France did not like them. For the next almost 50 years the French Wars of Religion ensued in which many Huguenots lost their lives. Then a remarkable thing happened. King Henry IV decided France had had quite enough of the Wars of Religion and the Huguenots could live peacefully and practice their religion in 20 specific French towns. His Proclamation, called the Edict of Nantes, lasted for 87 years. Though there were many violations of the Edict, life was more peaceful for the Huguenots than it was before the Edict or than it was after 1685 when King Louis XIV declared an end to the Edict of Nantes. What happened next was called, "The Reign of Terror." Huguenot homes and churches were burned and many of the people were killed or tortured or sold into slavery. Those who were able fled the country. If the Demouths were originally French Huguenots, they escaped from the reign of Terror and fled to Germany.

There is another story that the Demouths came from Holland. Lois Wells Wilson has our Demouths coming from France to Holland. Here is her version:
"Three De Mott brothers and other members of their family escaped from Brittany (that's part of France) and fled to Holland. They waited there ten years for any of their retainers who might wish to accompany them to the New World and who might find ways to escape from France to join them. One of the brothers received a large land grant from Holland to property up beyond Boonton in New Jersey."
We should consider this information because it was said to have come from Thomas Demouth (b.1804) a descendant who had lived his whole life in the area, even in the same house, as our immigrant forefather Jacob. May Sommers in her Demouth history also says they came from Holland.

Mr. George DeMuth has studied the history of the name "DeMuth," of which Demouth is thought to be a variation. He believes the name is definitely German and has a religious souce. The word Demuth in German means humility, an uncomfortable virtue in German culture. He connects the name backwards through history to the Waldensians in the Rhine Valley who were attracted to the teachings of Jan Huss, 1409. Huss tried to take church teachings back to their Biblical roots by emphasizing simple living and humility. Demuth as a name simply means "the humble one." Mr. DeMuth also says these folks who followed this religion lived mainly in the Rhine Valley along the border with France and that there were intermarriages with Huguenots. You can read more of Mr. DeMuth's interesting ideas in the sources that come after this story.

What we know from early records is that Jacob's son Frederick was born in Darmstadt, Germany in about 1697. And there is a record of a marriage between Jacob and Barbara Thewalt in 1736 saying Jacob was a widower from Hooghwysel, Darmstadt, Germany. Darmstadt is a city in Germany in the Rhine Valley. Hooghwysel I have looked and looked for. There is a village about 25 miles north of Darmstadt called Hoch Weisel. I think Hoch Weisel and Hooghwysel may be one and the same. We know our Demouths came over with the Palatines who were from the Rhine River Valley in Germany.
So while we know they lived for a time in or near Darmstadt, we should also keep our minds open to the possibility that they lived for a time in Holland and that they may, or may not, have been Huguenots. Some future researcher will be able to untangle this more fully than I have been able to.

Because of Mr. Henry Z. Jones Jr's research we know that Jacob and his family came to America in 1709 or 1710 with a group of people called the Palatines. So now I'm going to tell you a little bit about the Palatines.

Darmstadt is in an area of Germany near the Rhine River that was known as the Palatinate. It is a very beautiful and fertile area that was fought over for centuries by the Germans and French and even Dutch, English, and Spanish. During the 1600's the Palatine people endured terrible hardships and oppression brought on by religious and political wars. Even the weather turned against the people. In 1708-09 the winter was so cold birds were said to freeze on the wing. This was the final straw for the Palatines. Queen Anne in England agreed that any Palatines that traveled down the Rhine River (which would be north) to Rotterdam, (that's a city in Holland,) would be transported to England. And come they did, by the thousands! And Jacob Demouth and his small family were among them. Once in England they were herded into old wharehouses where they starved and waited for the authorities to decide what to do with them. They were given bread but never enough. Finally in December 1709 or January 1710 Jacob and his family boarded a boat for New York. On the boats conditions were even worse. There was a convoy of ten ships carrying 2,814 Palatines. There were rats, wormy food, dirty water, and poor sanitation. Many became ill with Typhoid Fever and other illnesses. 446 people died during the voyage and 250 more died soon after their arrival.

But Jacob and his wife Elizabetha, and three children, Johann Frederich, Anna Dorothea, and Anna Maria, survived.

Governor Hunter of New York purchased 6000 acres along the Hudson River for the Palatines. Our Demouths settled in a part called West Camp on the west bank of the Hudson River. Rachel Meyer in an article on Rootsweb called Who were the Palatines? describes the daily life of our Demouths in the camp.
"The settlers built rough huts and cabins to stave off the winter months. . . Cooking was done in large outside community stone ovens. House furniture, tables and chairs were carved out of the forest timber. The assignment to each family of such a small plot of ground (7 acres) seemed like an insult to these men who had been among the best farmers in Europe."
We don't know how long Jacob and his family stayed in the camp. We do know they were there in July 1710, and 1711. If you look at a map of New York and New Jersey you will see the west bank of the Hudson down near New York City is already in New Jersey. There are several references to Jacob in New Jersey. (See Jones.) By 1731 there is a record of Jacob in Eulenkill which was the early name of an area right near Boonton. There is also a record of Jacob Demuth and wife Elisabeth being sponsors for the child Conrad, son of Frederick b. Darmstadt, on 6 Mar 1733/34. Conrad is named as an heir in the will of our Frederick.

These records point up one of the problems of genealogy. Lois Wells Wilson described the problem thus: "It was necessary to search for information on these ancestors under such spellings as De Muth, Demont, De Mont, Dumont, Demit, Demet, Demott, De Mott, De Met, Demun, Demund, Demut, De Mutt, Dumon, Dumond, Dumot, Du Mott, Du Mond, De Muthe, and De Mouth. In France the name was often written 'de Mathe.'" In America the name was also written Dimouth, Zeymout, Tymouth, Temont, and Themoth to name a few. I think Alex Fowler described the reason behind all these spellings when he wrote, "You will appreciate that the spelling of 'Temout' for Demouth is probably the English phonetics of the Dutch pronunciation of the French name." Besides, folks weren't so particular about spelling back then. If you could write at all you were thought to be an educated person. That our Jacob was in that category is supported by Mr. Fowler's observation of a land deed, "Jacob signed his name but Elizabeth made her mark."

About 1730 Jacob built the old stone house. This is how Lois Wells tells it.
"In 1730 Jacob built a sturdy house of stone for his family not far from New Foundland near the site of the old Clinton Reservoir. . . The old stone house was occupied for a time by a De Mouth daughter whose husband, Peter Snyder, built an addition to the house and a new entry way. Above the door he set a triangular stone with the Mysterious-looking inscription P.X.S. 1773, (thought to mean built by Peter Snyder in 1773). It was occupied by our direct ancestors for five generations. The last to live there before it was destroyed was Margaret De Mouth who married Theodore Denman in 1854. Her daughter, Suzanne Denman, as a very young woman, went to visit the site and got the above information from the man who occupied the next farm, Thomas De Mouth."

Suzanne wrote a poem about the house. Here it is:

THE OLD HOUSE AND STONEY BROOK BRIDGE

I will sing you a song about Stoney Brook Bridge And the rivulet running below;
There my dear mother played when a child on the ridge,
Or basked in the warm evening glow:
Great Grandmother had a stone house at the place
That is now called the old Reservoir,
While in Rockaway Vale lay the first of our race,
Who had come to the spot long before.

There was Abner De Mouth with his mill and his shop
On his seven thousand acres of land,
Who invited the ministers always to stop
When they preached to the small zealous band;
There were other historical spots I have seen,
As I traveled the vale, ridge to ridge,
But the place that I love beyond others, I ween,
Are the Old Home and Stoney Brook Bridge.

Old Stone House on the Hill, where my mother was born,
And her own mother played when a child,
Where the golden rod blew in the glorious morn,
And love was a thing undefiled,
Thou art sacred to me and enshrined in my soul,
And my plea ever is to be true,
To the prayers that went up to the heavenly goal
From the hearts that were sheltered by you!

Susan Denman Vincett

I think Susan may have been a little confused about Abner and the 7000 acres. Jacob had a grandson, Adam, who may have lived there and was a quite wealthy man. But I believe his estate was more like 600 acres than 7000. Another description of the old stone house came from a site describing the Rockaway Township Bicentennial Quilt which included the house on one square. (web address: www.gti.net/rocktwp/5throw.html)
"The kitchen and dining rooms which were located in the cellar of the Stone Cottage had a fireplace with a capacity for burning eight-feet long logs, two other fireplaces were on the first floor and the walls of the building were two feet thick. "

Percy Crayon as well tells about the old stone house and a famous relic.
"This family was in the possession of . . .an old relic, a razor hone of petrified wood which came over with the family, and had traditionally been preserved in the family a long time during their residence in France. Several other relics were well preserved and of great antiquity."

We don't know when Jacob died. No record of a will has been found. But he left his estate to his son Frederick, whose story will be next.

What of Anna Dorothea and Anna Maria? Anna Maria married Martin Van Duyne in 1728. I have been in contact with one of her descendants, Cheryl Hahn. Anna Dorothea married Johann Peter Friederich. Anna Dorothea and Peter Friederich (It was normal in German families to give children two names and call them by the 2nd. Score one for the possible German heritage.) were sponsors for Johann Frederick's (call him Frederick) daughter Elisabetha when she was baptised on 29 Oct 1735. Our line continues with our ancestor, Frederick Demouth.

So this is the story of our immigrant Demouth ancestor, Jacob. He may have endured the suffering of the Huguenots and fled to Germany. He went from there to Holland and then to England. He came to America with the Palatines and endured all their troubles, including a horrible voyage. We know he was a somewhat educated man because he could write his name at a time when few could. He was able to preserve some wealth through all his struggles or else he was exceedingly hard working and resourceful after he arrived in America, or maybe both. After a very long journey that stretched at least from Germany to Holland to England to America, he finally found his home. In Morris County, New Jersey he built a beautiful estate which he left to his son. We can be very proud of our immigrant ancestor Jacob Demouth.

Here's how we are related to Jacob. Jacob had Johann Frederick Demouth, Frederick had Adam Demouth, Adam had Jacob Demouth, Jacob had John Demouth, John had Jacob Demouth, Jacob had Samuel De Mouth, Samuel had Thelma De Mouth, Thelma had Dianne Zimmerman, Dianne had Dawne Stevens, Dawne had . . . Sarah, Hannah, Timmy, and Becky Pamplin! And that's how you are related to the Huguenots and the Palatines!

Love, Granny


From Millers IN 1833 WILL, Acct of FAMILY; Ancestry.com
NOTES: The Beginning of the Mass Migration of Palatines

England needed new colonists for their “New Kingdom” in America. The Palatines had heard about this wonderful land across the sea. About Spring of 1709, the families began to sail down the Rhine to Rotterdam. The trip took 6 weeks. From April to October 1709 at least 13,500 were transported across the English Channel from Holland to England at the expense of the British government. The name of most of the Ramapo (Ramapough) group appeared on the shipping list for July.

In December 1709, they boarded the ships and started along the coast of England but anchored several months and it was 10 April 1710 before they started across the ocean. There were 30 births at sea. The first ship arrived in NY in the middle of June. By July, 446 children and adults had died.

Three of those ships that arrived in June were the “Lyon” (?) and the “Lion of Leath” on 13 June 1710 and the “Lowestoffee” on 14 June 1710.

New York didn’t like the fact of all these people in poor health arriving in NY, so they were camped out on Governor’s Island. A change in government in London cut off support for the Palatines and on 12 September 1712, Governor Hunter told them they were on their on.

Some stayed on, but others moved north to Schoharie Co., NY, some went to PA and some went south to Raritan, Somerset Co., NJ. A group of about a dozen men moved their families to Ramapough (Ramapo). On 18 April 1713 this small group of German Lutheran Palatine men with their families and meager possessions arrived at Ramapo (now Mahwah, Bergen Co., NJ) Among the families, was Johan Adam Mueller (Muller/ Miller) and his wife, Anna Mary (Maria) Drauth and his children.

Footnotes
  1. Bybee, Marsha<car 2106 @yahoo.com>.
  2. Jones,Henry Z. Jr., Palatine Families of New York, The (Universal City, CA 1985).

    Jacob Demuth (Hunter Lists #118) Jacob Demuth made his first appearance on the Hunter lIsts 1 July 1710 with 4 pers. over 10 yrs. of age and 2 pers. under 10 yrs. The household showed 5 pers over 10yrs. and 1 under 10 on 4 Oct 1710, 4 pers. over 10 yrs. and 1 under 10 on 31 Dec 1710, and then 5 pers. over 10 yrs. of age 24 June 1711. Jacob Dimouth, 1 man, 1 lad aged 9 to 15, 1 woman, and 2 maids aged 9 to 15, were in Ulster Co. in 1710/11 (West Camp Census). Jacob Yeymout/Zeymout was noted on the Ramapo Tract in N.J. in 1714 (Ramapo Tract Acct. Bk.). Jacob Demuth and his wife with 3 Ch. were at Hackensack ca. 1716/17 (Simmendinger Register); There was also a Jacob Demuth with wife Anna Elisabetha and 3 ch. at Beckmansland mentioned in Simmendinger. Jacob Demuth of Eulenkil and Hanover appeared in Berkenmeyer's Protocol in 1731 (Albany Protocol, p. 19) He md. 1st Anna Elisabetha (Febers?); he may have been the Jacob Tymouth widower, who md. Barbar Parleman, widow, in 1735 (Pompton Plains Ref. Chbk.) or the Jacob Themout, widower of Hooghwyzel, Darmstad, Germany, who md. Barbara Thewalt, widow, b. Moxter, Germany, in 1736 (Acquackanonk Ref. Chbk. ) . Issue with 1st wife:
    1) Anna Dorothea (HJ), md. Johann Peter Friederich June 1717 (N.Y. City Luth. Chbk.).
    2) Anna Maria (HJ), conf. at Newtown 12 June 1712 (West Camp Luth. Chbk.). She md. Martin Van Duyn (HJ), and they were sp. by Jacob Themoth and Elis. Febers in 1728 (Acquackanonk Ref. Chbk.).
    3) Johann Frederich (HJ), conf. Easter 1714 (West Camp Luth. CXhbk.). Fredrik Temont, single man b. Darmstadt, md. 14 April 1722 Annatie Miller, single woman b. Hedenborgh (Hackensack Ref. Chbk.): her full name was Annatie Charlotte Muller (HJ). Issue:
    i)Cornad, bpt. 4 weeks old 6 March 1733/34 on the Eulenkill - sp.: Jacob Demuth and wife Elisabeth (N.Y. Cuty Luth. Chbk.).
    ii) Elisabetha, b. 29 Oct. 1735 and bpt. on the Eulenkill - sp.: Pieter Friederich and wife Anna Dorothea (N.Y.City Luth. Chbk.).

  3. West Camp Census.

    Dimouth, Jacob - 1 man, 1 lad (9-15), 1 Woman, 2 maids (girls 9-15), Total - 5

  4. (Compiled by)Ehle, Boyd, C. E., Palatine Heads of Families from Governor Hunter's Ration Lists June 1710 to September 1714.

    Demuth, Jacob, (N)

  5. Fowler, Alex. D., Boonton, NJ, Demouth Report.

    DeMouth Report
    Alex D. Fowler
    P.O. box 112
    Boonton, N.J.
    Sept 28, 1949

    Mrs. Charles O. Webber
    37 Fillmore Street
    Denver 5, Colorado

    Dear Mrs. Webber:

    I am sorry you had to wait so long in hearing from me in regard to your inquiries of the Demouth family in Morris County. One reason for the delay, besides my vacation, was that it took me some time to analyze the various Demouth references I had already noted, and, moreover, I wanted to look up any further references in Trenton and Morristown when I recently made searches in those places. The net result of all this is that I can carry your Demouth line back positively two more generations and possibly three, and I believe I can clear up the question of the location of the old homestead.

    Starting with the first Demouth, Jacob, of whom I have found records as early as 1722, your line would appear as follows: Jacob (1), Frederick (2), Adam (3), and Jacob (4). The last Jacob (4), you already know about; he was the father of your John and the grandfather of Semantha. In what follows I shall give you the data on each or at least give you as much as has a bearing on the genealogical aspects.

    The first reference to Jacob (1) I have yet found is contained in Morris County Deeds, Book A, page 70 (abb. MC Deeds A/70) dated December 30, 1730, in which Jacob Temout and Elizabeth his wife convey some land near Montville, N. J., to Mathew Van Duyne. In this deed it is stated that Jacob Temout purchased the land on December 5, 1722, from John Koarta; also that previous to 1730, Jacob had sold 100 acres to his son Frederick(2). You will appreciate that the spelling of "Temout" for Demouth is probably the English phonetics of the Dutch pronunciation of the French name. Incidentally, Jacob (1) signed his name but Elizabeth made her mark. The land involved in the deed was not far from Pompton Plains where in 1736 was located the only Dutch Reformed church in this vicinity. Hence, when we find the first marriage performed in that church was Jacob Tymouth, widower, to Barbara Parleman, widow, in 1736, we are inclined to believe it to be your Jacob (1). There does not appear to be any record of a will filed for Jacob (1) in New J.

    As to Frederick (2), I find a record of a marriage in the Hackensack R.D. Church for Frederick Temout, young man, born in "Hedenborgh" (Edinborough ?), banns published April 14, 1722, both living in "Geemepogh" (Communipaw, Jersey City). This may or may not be Frederick (2), son of Jacob (1), but the probable age (young man) and the spelling of the name make it a strong probability. Since the marriage took place several months before Jacob (1) purchased land in Morris County, their residence, Communipaw, is not out of order. If my conjecture - that this is Frederick (2) - is correct, then this tells from what city - Darmstadt - the Demouths came from.

    To continue with the references to Frederick (2), the next thing I find is a deed filed in the vaults of the Secretary of the State of New Jersey at Trenton. In this deed, dated Sept. 27, 1748 filed in Book G-2, page 111, Frederick Demouth and four others were granted 422.70 acres by John Burnett and Samuel Neville. This land was on Rockaway River, but its exact location I haven't dtermined. Again, on July 10, 1750, Frederick purchased 614 acres of land (c.f. G-2, p. 518), this time mainly in Rockaway Valley which is very near Boonton. Purchase was made on May 1, 1758, (Trenton's Deedss p. 394) of 655 acres in Rockaway Valley from Thomas and Richard Penn (sons of Wm. Penn to whom the tract was laid out in 1730. Upon acquiring this tract, Frederick (2) established his home and his farm there. We know that this Frederick who bought the Penn tract was your ancestor, as will be shown below, but we are less sure that he was the same Frederick referred to in the Hackensack marriages or that he was the son of Jacob (1). However, he was referred to in the Trenton deeds as "Frederick Temout" and his mark was "FD." This fact is not without significance, even if it does not constitute proof.

    The next pertinent reference to Frederick (2) is his will dated Feb. 5, 1763, and proved Sept. 8, 1766. (N.J. Archives, 1st series Vol. XXXIII, p. 423) In his will he gives his wife Charlotte the use of all his real and personal property while his widow. "...Sons, Adam and Conrood, my plantation where I dwell, of 600 acres, and also land by Rockaway River, of 80 acres, and all other lands, except 4 lots at Newfoundland. When son, Conrood, shall get merried he is to have a setout equal to his brother and sisters. Daughters, Elizabeth and Catherine, 4 lots at Newfoundland. Executors - my two sons, Adam and Conrood." (Trenton Wills I, p. 56) The testators name was given as "Frederick Temout."

    It is my guess that one of the two daughters married Peter Snyder whose father had been a business associate of Frederick. This might account for the Peter Snyder house at Newfoundland being referred to as the Demouth place.

    All the references to Adam (3) have been posthumous ones: in MC Deeds E?90, dated April 10, 1790, "...Adam Miller and and Anna his wife, late Anna Demouth of Pequannock Township of the first part and Jacob Demouth of the second part...whereas Adam Demouth deceased...died intestate and at the same time was seized of considerable estate both real and personal in the County of Morris and elsewhere and whereas the same descended to his two children Jacob Demouth and Anna Demouth now Anna Miller..." This was a quit-claim deed releasing to Jacob 512 acres of the homestead farm of Adam Demouth, his father. Other deeds bearing out the above genealogical data were recorded in Morris County in 1797 (c.f. MC Deeds C/289; D/362; D/364).

    We thus have Jacob (4) obtaining the greater part of the homestead farm in Rockaway Valley. That he was your ancestor is proved by the following quit-claim deed (MC Deeds K-3/236, dated Feb. 16, 1836); "...Frederick Demouth Adam Demouth John Demouth Charlotte Demouth Richard Kayhart & Elizabeth his wife late Elizabeth Demouth of the Township of Pequanack and James Demouth and Jacob Demouth of the Township of Hanover...of the first part and Thomas Demouth of the Township of Pequanack ..of the second part..." The land conveyed was that already in Thomas' possession "..which descended to them as the heirs of Jacob Demouth, Esq.. late of Pequanack deceased...it being the homestead farm of the said Jacob Demouth, dec'd." The bounds of the farm are described in terms of adjacent farms well-known in Rockaway Valley. You will note that the above grantors and grantee are eight of the nine children (Mary excepted) named by you as children of your ancestor, Jacob Demouth. The location of this farm is within the old William Penn tract.

    I found various references to Jacob (4) in Munsell's History of Morris County, New Jersey published in 1882, but most of them refer to his activities as Justice of the Peace over a 20-year perioddddfrom 1815 until his death - most of this you seem to have learned already. He is credited with being the founder of the Rockaway Valley Methodist Church (c.f. Centennial Pamphlet of that church, published Sept. 20, 1942).

    There is still in Rockaway Valley what is known as the Demouth Cemetery in which the following tombstone inscriptions may be seen:

    On one stone: Jacob Demouth d. Mar. 22, 1835, in 72nd year
    Deborah, wf. of Jacob, d. Sept. 14, 1833 in 66th year
    Frederick Demouth, d. Apr 26, 1836, in 46th year
    Susannah, wid of Fred'ck, d. Apr 28, 1863
    Elizabeth Demouth, d. June 26, 1869, age 45 yrs. 9m, 2d.
    Jirah Demouth, d. May 20, 1854, age 42 yrs.
    Malinda, wf. of Jirah, d. Jan. 15, 1849, age 35 yrs.

    I was taken to the Demouth Cemetery by Mr. Frank Bott, an elderly resident near there, and he also pointed out to me the site of the old Demouth house which stood on the Butler road at a point due east of the cemetery. Mr Bott remembers seeing the remains of the foundations of the house, but there is no sign of them now.

    The Frederick Demouth whose inscription is given above was undoubtedly the son of Jacob (4). His (Frederick's) will (MC Wills D/457 dated July 8, 1834; proved May 10, 1836) names his wife Susan; son Jirah (who was devised 12 acres); son Decatur (also 12 acres); and daughters Elizabeth and Susan (who were to receive $60 each when they married or when 21). Witnesses: James M. Fleming, Thomas Demouth, and John Demouth.

    I have been unable to discover any relationship between the DeMotts of Pompton Plains and the Demouths of Rockaway Valley, although I have always suspected that there was a definite connection. None of the DeMott first names, except one jacob, are the same as those of the Demouths.

    A few unsuccessful inquiries were made by me to find some local descendants of the Demouths. Mr Frank Bott knew of none and the telephone directory listed only one bearing the name of Demouth. That one was formerly a Boonton alderman who died just recently.

    In Trenton I found, besides the deeds already mentioned, a list of tax rateables in Morris County. Among the rateables for the year 1778 were the following:
    Adam D'Mouth, 460 acres improved land worth L 3000;
    102 acres unimproved land worth L 200;
    L 220 out at interest

    Executors of Frederick Demout, one acre of improved land (no valuation)
    L175 out at interest.

    Adam Demouth in 1778 was rated one of the three wealthiest men in Pequannock Township.

    On studying the various data I have given you, you will undoubtedly have many questions about the points which I have not made clear or which I have not considered. If so, please let me know and I shall try and answer them.

    Yours very Truly,
    A. D. F.
    Alex D. Fowler, P.O. Box 112, Boonton, N.J.

  6. Crayon, Percy, Rockaway Records of Morris County NJ Families (Rockaway Publishing Company, Rockaway NJ: 1902).

    The DeMont, or De Mouth family were formerly residents of France, French Hugenots who fled from France on account of their Protestant faith, and removed to Hanover in Germany, and from hence emigrated to America in June, 1709, and became the first white settlers in the Rockaway Valley, in this township. They were the first white settlers in the valley and this family was in the possession of old papers and deeds dating from 1709 to 1730, and an old relic, a razor hone of petrified wood which came over with the family, and had traditionally been preserved in the family a long time during their residence in France. Several other relics were well preserved and of great antiquity.

    The early family records had been lost, but history mentions Frederick, and Jacob, a probable son. They were also among the earliest settlers of New Foundland in this (Rockaway) township. The mythical inscription "P.xS 1773" in the triangle stone above the door of the old stone house now owned by Theodore Brown, may be interpreted that the building was erected by Peter Snyder in 1773. It was an addition to the original stone house built just forty years previous upon the lands owned by a member of the DeMouth family, who located there from Rockaway Valley about 1730, and inherited by the wife of Peter Snyder, who was a daughter of this settler at New Foundland."

  7. Lois Wells Wilson, edited by Warren E. Wilson, 1989, Family History of the Ancestors of Lois Eleanor Wells.

    Early records, and the De Mouths themselves, frequently spelled the name differently, so it was necessary to search for information on these ancestors under such spellings as De Muth, Demont, De Mont, Dumont, Demit, Demet, Demott, De Mott, De Met, Demun, Demund, Demut, De Mutt, Dumon, Dumond, Dumot, Du Mott, Du Mond, De Muthe, and De Mouth. In France the name was often written "de Mathe", as is shown in more than one transaction we found. In "Notorial Records from 1603 to 1665" Pierre Sanxy is listed as attorney for Joachim and Clorinde de Mathe, his wife. (Our branch of the family always pronounced the name to rhyme with "Vermouth" regardless of how it was spelled.)

    The earliest De Muths came over before the Huguenot troubles in France, colonized the Bergen, N.J. area and had large landholdings dating from 1624 in and near Boonton, N.J. The De Mott Hill and Cemetery there still exist. They say that Abner De Mouth lived like a feudal lord; he had 7000 acres of land, had his own brewery and his own blacksmith shop, all on his own place.

    Our direct ancestral De Mouths were Huguenots, natives of France who fled from there at the time of Louis XIV when he revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685. (The Edict had been promulgated by Henry IV in 1598 and had given the Huguenots almost a hundred years of peace.) The Revocation created a period called the "Reign of Terror" by those who endured the persecution, who had all their property confiscated, who were forbidden to worship as Protestants and whose lives were threatened if they failed to conform or tried to escape. Their ministers were nearly all executed. Fortunate escapees fled to Germany and Holland.

    Three De Mott brothers and other members of their family escaped from Brittany and fled to Holland. They waited there ten years for any of their retainers who might wish to accompany them to the New World and who might find ways to escape from France to join them. One of the brothers received a large land grant from Holland to property up beyond Boonton in New Jersey. In 1709 these three families came to America. Some settled in the Boonton area where earlier De Mouths had colonized; the little towns and hills and cemeteries thereabouts still bear the family name. Others settled down in Somerset and they gradually spread out all over Rockaway Valley.

    Many early family records have now been lost but history records that two of these brothers, Jacob and Frederick De Mouth, from 1709 to 1730 recorded legal papers and deeds to property at New Foundland in Rockaway Township and elsewhere in Rockaway Valley. The records. refer to them as "Jacob and Frederick De Mouth, first settlers of Rockaway Valley". These records spell their names variously as De Mathe, De Mott, De Mouth, De Muthe or De Muth.

  8. Pat DeMuth Email (<demuth@frontiernet.net> ), 18 Feb 2006.

    The following is a little about the
    origin of the Demuth surname the prof. George DeMuth did some time ago. Note
    the very last paragraph.
    Origin Of The Demuth Surname
    Some have suggested that Demuth is a French Huguenot name, this is a false
    assumption. The name is common throughout Germany and especially in
    Schlesien as well as Luxembourg. It has two different etymologies. The
    first is from the Middle High German word "diemuot" or "demuot", being an
    adjective meaning "condescending" or "modest". An example of this is in
    1293, Heinrich dictus Diemuot, zu Oberried" (i.e. Heinrich the modest of
    Oberried). It was common for descriptive adjectives to become surnames
    during this early time period. In German dictionaries Demut means meekness
    or humility.
    The second origin for the name Demuth comes from a woman's first name. When
    a son is referred to as son of Demut, in some cases it developed into a
    surname, as in this example from Hessen records from 1336, "Emercho filius
    Demudis, zu Niederingeheim" (i.e. Emercho son of Demudis, of
    Niederingeheim).
    According to German books on surnames, the name of Demuth might have
    described a character trait: Demuth or Demut, as it has to be written since
    the last German spelling reform in 1901, is the German word for "Humility".
    Demuth was also in use as a female Christian name, and so the surname of
    Demuth can also be matronymic, referring to a woman, probably a mother,
    called Demuth. The surname of Demuth can also be the germanized from of the
    French surname of Dumont. Dumont means "of the Mountain". Demuth does not
    mean "of courage", as occasionally stated: the name is certainly not
    composed of the Latin preposition 'de', the Latin word for "of", and "Muth"
    or "Mut", as we have to spell it since 1901, the German word for courage,
    related to the English word "mood".
    Demuth, the Origin of the Name
    By George R. DeMUTH
    The following, though brief, covers many years and many countries. It is a
    hypothesis based on the documented history of certain peoples. In what
    follows, there is no way to avoid discussing Christianity, including the
    organization of Western Christianity (as opposed to Orthodox or Coptic
    Christianity), for Christianity and the church activities are important to
    the name.
    The name, Demuth: what does it mean and what is the origin of the word? It
    came into German from Gothic as a word coined by the Christians in the first
    five hundred years after Christ to express in the Gothic language the virtue
    which we call "humbleness" or "humility" in English, stronger than our
    current meaning of modesty. No word for it existed in Gothic. As an
    example of its use in the Bible: Acts 20, verse 19: "I served the Lord with
    great humility..." In Vulgate or church Latin, "...serviens Domino cum omni
    humilitate..." In German, "...gedient mit aller Demuth..." The Gothic
    language simply had no word for such a feeling or attitude. So the
    translators made a word from "diener" and "muth" meaning the spirit of a
    server of diener; the combination may have transiently been "dienmuth" but
    it entered German from Gothic as Demuth.* It is a very uncommon German
    family name.
    How did this become our family name? The story, I believe, starts in the
    11th century in Lombardy, northern Italy; but is easier to go backwards from
    four or five centuries later. There is substantial evidence to support the
    general hypothesis which follows; but, of course, we do not have the given
    names of any of the individuals before 1650.
    Let us start with the history of the Moravian Church (although not all,
    maybe most Demuths were not Moravian members). This church was founded by
    the followers of Jan or John HUSS, who in 1409 became Rector of Karl's
    University in Prague, the very influential head of the country's main
    university, when Prague was on of the, if not the leading city of Europe.
    He attempted to bring about church reforms (this was a century before Martin
    LUTHER), was highly respected, but thus gained enmity, and was martyred in
    1415. He left many believers and they grew in number over the next century
    and a half. Many non-Czechs were attracted, mostly Germans, and a very high
    proportion of these were Waldensians.
    Many of the Waldensians by then lived in the area of the Rhine, adjacent to
    Alsace and Lorraine, in German speaking parts of Switzerland, and in the
    southwest parts of modern Germany. Many were attracted to the teachings of
    Huss, since they were and had been for centuries a religious group who were
    trying to reform the Christian church as they saw it. I postulate that the
    Moravian Church Demuths were former Waldensians. They definitely were of
    German lineage. Other Waldensian Demuths, maybe the majority, remained in
    that corner of Germany and nearby France. You may note that some of the
    descendants of the latter group were later Roman Catholics. This is easily
    explained. The religious of most people after the end of the Thirty Year
    War (1648-Peace of Westphalia) was the religion of that Prince in whose
    province they lived. If your prince was Catholic, you were Catholic; if he
    was Lutheran, you were Lutheran, etc. except for the small number who went
    "underground," which the Moravian Seed did.
    Who were the Waldensians? They were a religious sect which was originally
    composed of the followers of Peter WALDO, who was a religious reformer from
    Lyon, France. He began preaching in about 1173 about the need to reform
    Christian practices including the excesses of the papacy and of other church
    leaders. His followers formed a substantial body of people in northern
    Italy as well as in southern France. They gave up ostentatious dress and
    pomp, and emphasized the Bible and the early church doctrine. Needless to
    say, their efforts were not totally appreciated by the Pope, who was quite
    worldly at this time. Tolerated for a while, the Waldensians eventually
    were persecuted, many of them were driven into the foothills and valleys of
    the Alps. Many then many moved north to northern France and spread into
    what is now Germany. There are still, however, Waldensians in northern
    Italy (approximately 20,000) as well as in southern France and other parts
    of the world.
    Now, how did the name Demuth become applied to some Waldensians? Not long
    before the development of the Waldensian movement, there was in Lombardy
    (part of Northern Italy) another dissident religious group equally strongly
    troubled by the material and worldly policies of the Western Christian
    church. These called themselves the Humiiati, the humble ones. At first,
    they were tolerated by the Roman church. Later, they had some interchange
    of membership with the Waldensians, but they remained for quite a while a
    discrete group. At the end of the 12th century, the Pope decided to
    eradicate them. Many were killed. But some of them then were or had
    already been incorporated into the Waldensian sect.
    My hypothesis is that when the Waldensians moved north and entered the
    German speaking area, there was still an identifiable sub-group of them
    (perhaps no many) who were still identified as Humiliati. These people
    took, as a German surname, the close German trraduation diploma have a lower
    case or small "m.' All legal papers were written with a small "m". And
    yet, I know his father toyed with writing the name with a capital "M" (in
    the margin of one of his books). I postulate that this may have been
    influenced by his family having had two prior generations of marriages to
    Huguenots, who were originally from northern France, Lorraine and the border
    country. It is only a guess.
    * [Foot Note: Professor Graf noted that it appeared to him that many
    Germans, modern day and past found Demuth both difficult to acknowledge as a
    virtue and an uncomfortable feeling.]
    Sources:
    Encyclopedia Brittanica (general)
    Multimedia Encyclopedia (general)
    The New Columbia Encyclopedia (general)
    History of the Moravian Church (J. Taylor HAMILTON and Kenneth G. HAMILTON)
    You Are My Witnesses, The Waldensians Across 800 years (Giorgio TOURN and
    Associates)
    Private Communication from Professor Otto GRAF (German and Linguistics)
    Taken from an email, 28 Oct 2001
    I have a hypothesis for which there is circumstantial evidence that the
    Demuth name came indirectly from Humiliati, an Italian sect in the XIIth
    century, who was called the humble ones. They joined the Waldensians, moved
    to the Palatinate area. The Waldensians were early supporters of Jan Hus
    (or Huss). Anyway, Demuth means the humble one. I have my own guess as to
    the capitalization of the M by some (there were some French Hugenot
    marriages).
    George DeMuth

  9. Ibid., 17 Feb 2006.

    I am afraid I can't be of much help on this Demouth family. I am aware of
    the West Camp family and have tried to locate their ancestor home of
    Hooghwyzel/Hoch-Weisel/etc with no luck. Unfortunately there are some very
    poorly researched books out there that have spread misleading information.
    I have heard of the Huguenots tied to this family but have not traced the
    source of it down. Most everything I have come across indicated they were
    German Palatines NOT French, but I am far an expert of this family line.

  10. Demouth Papers Rec'd from Marsha Bybee Feb 22, 2002.
  11. Ancestry.com, U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s about Jacob Demuth.

    Name: Jacob Demuth
    Arrival Year: 1709
    Arrival Place: New Jersey
    Family Members: Wife & 3 children
    Source Publication Code: 8480
    Primary Immigrant: Demuth, Jacob
    Annotation: Originally entitled, Warhoffte und glaubwuerdige Verzeichniss jeniger Personen.... Reutlingen, Germany: ca. 1717. Names and ages, pp. 11-19. Also printed in no. 4010, Knittle.
    Source Bibliography: SIMMENDINGER, ULRICH. True and Authentic Register of Persons Still Living, by God's Grace, Who in the Year 1709, under the Wonderful Providences of the Lord Journeyed from Germany to America or New World and There Seek Their Piece of Bread at Various Places.... St. Johnsville, NY: The Enterprise and News, 1934. 20p. Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1962. Repr. 1984.
    Page: 12

  12. Ibid., American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) about Jacob Demuth.

    Name: Jacob Demuth
    Birth Date: 1680
    Birthplace: Ger, New York
    Volume: 42
    Page Number: 329
    Reference: True and authentic reg. Of persons still living, who journeyed from Germany to Amer. By Ulrich Simmendinger. St. Johnsville, NY. 1934. (20p.):12

  13. A Celebration of Legend, Fact and Spirit 1785 - 1985 (Rockaway Valley United Methodist Church; 1985), Excerpts.


    "The Bergen Dutch Reformed Church records from 1664 - 1801 contain family names of Decker, DeGroot (DeGraw), Demouth, Van Winkel, Van der Hoof Vreeland and VanZile. The forefathers led active church lives, moved from the crowded Passaic and Hackensack Valleys to our corner of old Pequannockk, Hanover and Rockaway Townships and attended either the old BoonTown church close to the Parsippany border, or the "Pumptan" house of worship.

    An earlier Jacob Demouth, great-grandfather of our church founder, was married in the "Pumpton" church in 1736, its founding year, by the Reverend Johannes Van Driessen, self-styled 'extra-ordinary Instructor.' Its ancient Kerck Boeck record includes the familiar names of Demouth, Decker, Miller. Gould, Van Winkel, Romine, Hiler, Vreeland Vanderhoof, Fredericks, Kock (Cook), Pier, Husk, Young, Crane, Smith, Van Zile, DeGraw, Sisco, Brown, Kerhart (Kayhart), Carmen, Taylor, Nix, Ryker, Rhinesmith, Mead, Witty, Ryerson, Conklin, Doland and Struble. ...
    our citizens who travelled to BoonTown or the Plains for a good sermon in familiar Dutch (5) were left without consistent pastoral guidance. ..."

  14. Ancestry.com, Message Boards: Re: Millers IN 1833 WILL, Acct of FAMILY.

    NOTES: The Beginning of the Mass Migration of Palatines

    England needed new colonists for their “New Kingdom” in America. The Palatines had heard about this wonderful land across the sea. About Spring of 1709, the families began to sail down the Rhine to Rotterdam. The trip took 6 weeks. From April to October 1709 at least 13,500 were transported across the English Channel from Holland to England at the expense of the British government. The name of most of the Ramapo (Ramapough) group appeared on the shipping list for July.

    In December 1709, they boarded the ships and started along the coast of England but anchored several months and it was 10 April 1710 before they started across the ocean. There were 30 births at sea. The first ship arrived in NY in the middle of June. By July, 446 children and adults had died.

    Three of those ships that arrived in June were the “Lyon” (?) and the “Lion of Leath” on 13 June 1710 and the “Lowestoffee” on 14 June 1710.

    New York didn’t like the fact of all these people in poor health arriving in NY, so they were camped out on Governor’s Island. A change in government in London cut off support for the Palatines and on 12 September 1712, Governor Hunter told them they were on their on.

    Some stayed on, but others moved north to Schoharie Co., NY, some went to PA and some went south to Raritan, Somerset Co., NJ. A group of about a dozen men moved their families to Ramapough (Ramapo). On 18 April 1713 this small group of German Lutheran Palatine men with their families and meager possessions arrived at Ramapo (now Mahwah, Bergen Co., NJ) Among the families, was Johan Adam Mueller (Muller/ Miller) and his wife, Anna Mary (Maria) Drauth and his children.

    They settled in that area and organized into a congregation under Lutheran Pastor Justus Falckner.

    In trying to locate the name of the place that Johannes Adam Miller and Anna Catharina Streit were married, Remobuch (Remobuack or Remebok), Bergen Co., NJ, I find “Campgaw near Remobuch NJ at Jacob DeMuth’s”. Campgaw is mostly in what is present day Franklin Lakes, but possibly also in present day Oakland, Mahwah, and Wyckoff.

    Ramapough (Ramapo, and areas locations) was a precinct of Saddle River; also spelled Ramepough, Rammepough, Ramepogh, Rammepogh, Rammapough, Ramapogh, and then you have the Ramopock, Romopack, and Remopock.

    SOURCE: According to the "Palatines & Airmont Lutheran Church History" at the Dutch Door Genealogy

  15. Ibid., American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) about Jacob Demuth.

    Name: Jacob Demuth
    Birth Date: 1680
    Birthplace: Ger, New York
    Volume: 42
    Page Number: 329
    Reference: True and authentic reg. Of persons still living, who journeyed from Germany to Amer. By Ulrich Simmendinger. St. Johnsville, NY. 1934. (20p.):12

  16. Jones,Henry Z. Jr., Palatine Families of New York, The (Universal City, CA 1985), p. 144.

    he may have been the Jacob Tymouth widower, who md. Barbar Parleman, widow, in 1735 (Pompton Plains ref. Chbk.)

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