Husband: Philip Zimmerman (1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9)
Born: 10 Jan 1851 in Sebringville, Perth Co., Ontario, Canada
Married: 18 Feb 1874 in Mower County, Minnesota (75)
Died: 21 Aug 1941 in Spring Valley, Fillmore, Minnesota (10)
Father: Johann Christian Zimmerman
Mother: Elizabeth Dorothea Knoll, Kneil Knell
Spouses:
Wife: Ernestine Krause (11 12 13 14 15 16 17)
Born: 25 May 1853 in Schlaesingen, Prussia (18)
Died: 18 Aug 1926 in Fillmore County, Minnesota (19)
Father: Johann Benjamin Krause
Mother: Henriette Pauline Schneider
Spouses:
Children
01 (F): Annie Marie Zimmerman (21 22 23 24 25 26)
Born: 19 Nov 1874 in Martin Co., MN (27 28)
Died: 16 Feb 1964 in Birmingham, Michigan
Spouses: Alfred Christian Nelson, Rev.
02 (M): Julius Benjamin Zimmerman (29 30 31 32)
Born: 06 Oct 1876 in Fillmore County, Minnesota (33)
Died: 11 Nov 1935 in Rochester, MN (34)
Spouses:
03 (M): Albert Peter Zimmerman (36 37 38 39 40)
Born: 19 Apr 1878 in Fillmore County, Minnesota (41 42)
Died: 12 Dec 1951 (43)
Spouses: Anna Thompson
04 (M): David Philip Zimmerman (44)
Born: 16 Jan 1881 in Fillmore County, Minnesota (45)
Died: 26 Jul 1882 in Fillmore County, Minnesota (46)
Spouses:
05 (M): Edward Walter Zimmerman (47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54)
Born: 16 Feb 1886 in Spring Valley, Fillmore, Minnesota
Died: 13 Jun 1953 (55)
Spouses: Theresa Tabor
06 (F): Minnie Etta Zimmerman (56 57 58 59 60 61)
Born: 20 Jun 1889 in MN
Died: 30 Jan 1955 in Santa Ana, Orange, California (62)
Spouses:
07 (F): Esther Alice Zimmerman (64 65 66 67 68 69)
Born: 07 Oct 1891 in MN
Died: 16 Nov 1960 in Santa Ana, Orange, California (70)
Spouses:
08 (F): Fern Joy Zimmerman (71 72 73)
Born: 18 Jan 1899
Died: 22 Aug 1996 in Newport Beach, Orange, CA (74)
Spouses:
Additional Information

Philip Zimmerman:

Notes:


From "The Christian Zimmerman Story" by Dianne Z. Stevens 2013:
The seventh and last child of Christian and Elizabeth Zimmerman was Phillip Zimmerman (1851 Sebringville, Ontario, Canada – 1941 Spring Valley, Fillmore, Minnesota). We know a lot about Phillip and his family because he was Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson's father!
Phillip married Ernestine Krause (1853 Prussia – 1941 Spring Valley, Fillmore Co., Minnesota) I want to tell you a little about the Krause family. The Krause farm adjoined the farm of Phillip's brother, Peter Zimmerman. Peter's daughter married Julius Krause, brother to Ernestine Krause. Aside of their streak of irritability and the red-headed grandmother, Annie Marie describes the Krause family this way:

"My grandfather Krauses family was musical, but as they did not have musical instruments in those early days they expressed their musical talent in song. They sang at their work and at their play. You could never be at their home for any length of time without hearing their song. It was as natural for them to sing as it was to eat. It was a part of their nature and their life. When the youngest child was about thirteen years old, grandfather bought an organ and she learned to play, and then they had many a family sing, with the organ. But I love to think of their song as I used to hear it in my childhood days when they were working in the fields or as they were preparing meals or making beds, or most frequently in the open as they did their work about the house and barn. I shall never forget their clear beautiful voices."

The Krause family is another of the group of families that appears to have migrated from near Sebringsville, Canada to Fillmore County, Minnesota, along with Zimmermans, Riehls, and Krusps.

The Wilder Family Farm was also in Spring Valley, Minnesota. From May 1890 to October 1891 Laura and Almanzo lived with Almanzo's parents there and attended the Methodist church. So Phillip's family undoubtedly knew Laura Ingalls Wilder and the Wilder family.

Ernestine Krause:

Buried: Spring Valley, Minnesota 20

Notes:

Per 1880 census, both of Ernestine's parents are from Prussia.
Per Van Lehn Gedcom her parents were Johan Benjamin Krause (1822 - 1891) and Henriette Pauline Schneider (1828 - 1904)

There are 7 Krause graves in Preston Cemetery.

Per Annie Nelson Zimmerman History - "Ernestine came to America with her parentsin May 1861, when she was nine years old."

(02) Julius Benjamin Zimmerman:

Cause of Death: punctured lung

Buried: Spring Valley, Minnesota 35

Notes:

Did not marry per C.Zimmerman family sheet #2

"In 1899, Julius
left for western Montana and
worked with the sheep-herders and
cattlemen, an era of the early west
known today as'cowboy days.' " Per Philip Zimmerman obituary

From "The Christian Zimmerman Story" by Dianne Z. Stevens 2013:
Phillip and Ernestine's second child was Julius Benjamin Zimmerman (1876 Minnesota – 1935 Minnesota). Julius never married. As a young man he went west to Montana and worked several years on the range herding sheep and cattle. Eventually he came back to the old home in Minnesota to care for aging parents.

(04) David Philip Zimmerman:

Cause of Death: Scarlet Fever

Notes:

From "The Christian Zimmerman Story" by Dianne Z. Stevens 2013:
Phillip and Ernestine's fourth child was David Phillip Zimmerman (1881 Minnesota – 1882 Minnesota). David died as a toddler of Scarlet Fever.

(06) Minnie Etta Zimmerman:

Buried: Fairhaven Cemetery, Santa Ana, California 63

Notes:

per Gordon Zimmerman letter 21 Nov 2005: " These ladies (Minnie, Esther, and Fern) were all librarians at U. of Minn. Their uncle Jules Krause hired them to move to Santa Ana in 1940's and came for them. I met him in ____ 1949."

From "The Christian Zimmerman Story" by Dianne Z. Stevens 2013:
Phillip and Ernestine's sixth child was Minnie Etta Zimmerman (1889 Minnesota – 1955 California).

Minnie first taught high school, then did graduate work and became the librarian at Winona State Teachers College.

(07) Esther Alice Zimmerman:

Notes:

per Gordon Zimmerman letter 21 Nov 2005: " These ladies (Minnie, Esther, and Fern) were all librarians at U. of Minn. Their uncle Jules Krause hired them to move to Santa Ana in 1940's and came for them. I met him in ____ 1949."

In the Philip Zimmerman Bible her name is Alice Esther.


From "The Christian Zimmerman Story" by Dianne Z. Stevens 2013:
Phillip and Ernestine's seventh child was Esther Alice Zimmerman (1891 Minnesota – 1960 California). Alice, as she was called, was also a college graduate, and taught for twenty years in Cloquet High School, Minnesota. Annie Marie relates this story:

"Alice had a serious accident while traveling through Yellowstone Park. She happened to be near a hot spring when the crust on which she was standing gave way and she fell into the boiling water burning her legs badly. For some time there seemed to be no hope for her life, but she had the Zimmerman vitality and shocked her doctor by getting well."

(08) Fern Joy Zimmerman:

Notes:

per Gordon Zimmerman letter 21 Nov 2005: " These ladies (Minnie, Esther, and Fern) were all librarians at U. of Minn. Their uncle Jules Krause hired them to move to Santa Ana in 1940's and came for them. I met him in ____ 1949."

From "The Christian Zimmerman Story" by Dianne Z. Stevens 2013:
Phillip and Ernestine's eighth child was Fern Joy Zimmerman (1899 Minnesota – 1996 California). Fern too was a college graduate, and taught for twenty years in Cloquet High School, Minnesota along with Alice. Annie Marie writes:

"Sister Fern had a serious automobile accident from which no one ever expected her to recover, but after months of pain and suffering she too showed her Zimmerman vitality and got well. How she ever managed to get well no one can tell, but she did after weeks of unconsciousness and untold pain."

And she lived a very long life, living to the age of 97. Fern Joy died 196 years after her grandfather Christian was born.

Footnotes
  1. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED86, 436 D.

    Zimmermon, Philip self age 29 Can Darmstadt Darmstadt Occ: Farmer
    Ernestine wife 27 Prussia Prussia Prussia Keeping House
    Anna dau 5 MN Can Prussia
    Julius son 3 " " "
    Albert son 2 " " "
    Larson Chris other 23 Norway Nor Nor works on farm

  2. Census, Federal - 1900 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp ED 37.
  3. Census, Federal - 1910 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED 35, p. 1B.
    (30 Apr 1910)
  4. Census, Federal - 1920 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Village, p. 10A.
    (9 Jan 1920)
  5. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
  6. Zimmerman History Packet Received from J. Rose 26 Feb 2005.
  7. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)).

    p.10 For more than twenty years that school was conducted by a Mr. Hamilton. He was a school master of the old type, who did not believe in spoiling the child by sparing the rod. In the home too, children were punished most severely in those days, sometimes at very slight provocations. I have heard my father tell of how a lamp chimney was broken in some way. It was thought that he could have prevented it if he had been watching the children more cautiously, so he had to be whipped. Thirty-nine strokes was the punishment. Nowadays we would consider such treatment beyond all reason, and some people think that one should not punish a child at all. A generation or two makes a great change in people?s thinking. ...

    When my father was fourteen years old, Henry being in need of money, advised him to work for someone who would pay him a salary. So it came about that he was employed by an old Scotchman for six months for ten dollars a month and board. When the six months were up the Scotchman paid him the salary in silver dollars. My father carried those sixty silver dollars home six miles to Uncle Henry, who then gave him seventy five cents out of it for spending money. This was the first spending money that my father had ever had and it is interesting to note how he spent it. First he says he bought a comb for himself thinking how fine it would be to have one all his very own. Then as most boys would have done he bought a jackknife, and with what money there was left he bought candy to treat his brothers. He was badly in need of a suit of clothes at this time so that he could go to church and Sunday school, but that seems to have been out of the question. My Uncle Adam, who was next younger than Henry, and who was now living in the United States at Preston, Minnesota, made a visit to Canada about this time; and when he returned he took my father with him. From this time on my father earned his own living either by working for his brothers or some of their neighbors during the summer, and in the winter time he worked in the pine woods in Minnesota.

    p.11 My father was working for his brother Peter when he met Emetine Krause, to whom he was married February 18, 1874. The Krause farm joined the Peter Zimmerman farm on the east.

    The PHILIP
    ZIMMERMAN Obituary

    Philip Zimmerman,
    the youngest of seven
    children, was born in
    Ontario, Canada, January
    10, 1851. His father,
    Christian Zimmerman,
    died when Philip was
    five months old. At the
    age of 14 it was
    necessary for the boy to
    earn his own living, and
    he found employment on
    the farm of a kindly
    Scotchman, Robert
    Murray, at ten dollars a
    month. An older brother
    had earlier left for
    Minnesota and Philip
    followed him. Philip's
    first job was working for
    Dr. Von Lochen of
    Preston driving the
    doctor's team and caring
    for them. The following
    winter, at the age of
    sixteen, he joined a crew
    of lumberjacks in the
    pine woods along the
    Mississippi.
    In 1874 he married
    Ernestine Krause of
    Racine. They made their
    home near Fairmont,
    Minnesota. For two
    successive years a plague
    of grasshoppers
    destroyed their entire
    crop, so they abandoned
    their farm and returned to
    Spring Valley.
    They settled on what is
    known as the Zimmerman
    Homestead, the farm 3½
    miles northwest of Spring
    Valley, where Mr. and Mrs.
    Jack Briggs have been
    living. Philip placed his
    building on a hill above
    Deer Creek, close to a large
    spring which served for
    years as a refrigerator.
    As the children grew old
    enough to help with the
    work, more land was
    acquired until the original
    160 became 360 acres. For
    the Zimmerman's and their
    seven children this was the
    good life known by the
    early settlers of our
    community. They "broke"
    (cleared) the land, planted
    crops, raised chickens and
    stock. They slept on cornhusk
    mattresses in summer
    and feather beds in winter.
    They canned from two to
    four hundred quarts of fruit
    yearly and made twenty
    gallons of sauerkraut. They
    boarded the crew of "Irish
    paddies" who laid the track
    for the Great Western
    railroad across their farm
    and built the high trestle.
    There were picnics in the
    "Jensen woods" and on the
    winter evenings, visiting
    back and forth with their
    good neighbors, the Thayers, the
    Hesses, and the Churchills. In
    winters with the sleigh, in summer
    with the "surrey with the fringe on
    top," they drove every Sunday to the
    first Methodist Church of Spring
    Valley.
    In 1924, friends and neighbors
    celebrated the golden wedding
    anniversary of the Zimmerman's.
    Mrs. Zimmerman passed away in
    1926, but Mr. Zimmerman reached
    the age of 90, passing away in 1941.
    Of the seven children three are
    living, Annie, Alice, and Fern. In
    1905 Annie, the oldest child married
    a Methodist minister Fred Nelson.
    They are now retired and live in Los
    Altos, California. In 1899, Julius
    left for western Montana and
    worked with the sheep-herders and
    cattlemen, an era of the early west
    known today as "cowboy days."
    In 1906, Albert married Anna
    Thompson and farmed in the
    Buckwheat Ridge community,
    retiring to Spring Valley in 1946.
    Edward married Tressie Tabor in
    1913 and took over the old home
    form, for his father retired that year
    and moved to the northeast part of
    Spring Valley. Minnie first taught
    high school, then did graduate work
    and became the librarian at Winona
    State Teachers College. Alice and
    Fern taught for twenty years in
    Cloquet High School, Minnesota.
    They now make their home with a
    92-year old uncle, Julius Krause, in
    Santa Ana, California.

    Chap.3; p. 11
    "(My father Philip Zimmerman had) a very quiet lovable disposition. I cannot remember of ever seeing him angry. He always displays that quiet even temperament under all circumstances and would rather take a little abuse than quarrel with anyone. He has always been very fond of his children and when they were small played with them a great deal. When they were big enough to help him he tried to make work easy by telling stories or experiences that he had had. He was a very good story teller, and like his mother has an exceptional instinct for analyzing end understanding human nature. I have often been surprised how well he could judge the character of people whom he did not know just by talking with them a few moments, and he seldom he judged wrong. He always made his living by working on a farm, but would like to have had a chance to study medicine. He did spend one winter studying with a doctor, but there was no opportunity for him to continue with such a course."

    [Philip at school in Canada; Philip coming to MN; Philip's obituary; Philips personality]

  8. Ibid., My Family pp. 1-7.

    Chapter 3 MY PARENTS Page 1 MY PARENTS
    My parents, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Zimmerman met for the first time at the home of my father's brother, Peter Zimmerman, one summer when they were both helping him harvest his crop. She was 18 and he nearly two years older. The Peter Zimmerman farm joined my grandfather Krause's farm on the west and it was the custom for neighbors to help each other during the harvest time. The grain was all bound by hand in those days, and my mother had had lots of experience in out-of-door work, so she was an excellent hand at binding sheaves. Four years later, February 18, 1874, they were married. They celebrated their Golden Wedding at their home in Spring Valley, Minnesota, February 18, 1924. At the time when they were married there was no church in the community, so they were married in the Middle Branch School House, which still stands, and still serves as a public school building. My mother's girl friend, Lisa Gahringer, was ready to marry a young man by the name of Warner about the same time, so arrangements were made for a double wedding. Rev. Hilcher of the German Evangelical Church officiated. The little school house was well filled and the wedding was a happy affair. As long as my mother lived at home with her parents she had to be her father?s hired man, doing all kinds of hard work outside, which was not usually done by women. She had to help haul rock for making the foundations of the farm buildings, and as there were quite a number of these, and the foundations were large and high, rock hauling became a task which seemed to have no end. There was a house, a barn, a granary, a wood shed, a stone millhouse, and numerous other smaller buildings. Then too, there was wood to haul and cut, and manure to haul and spread, and of course, the regular work of the farm was always crowding on, such as the seeding, harvesting, thrashing, plowing, corn husking, and all the many other tasks that had to be done on the farm. With all this kind of work she had to help. It seemed that grandfather would never do a thing without taking her along. There was always lots of hard work, and never any time for pleasure, or doing the things that one liked to do. Vacations were unheard of in those days. My mother was very fond of all kinds of fancywork and sewing. Quilt piecing was quite a craze at that time, but there was never any time for anything like that in my grandfather's home. I have heard my mother tell of trying to piece quilt patches after she was supposed to be in bed. It was too bad that she could not have had an opportunity to do some of the things she 1iked to do, and that girls should have the opportunity of doing. She says she was glad to marry as it meant an opportunity for her to do as she liked and a measure of' freedom from a hard life.
    After the wedding my parents went to Martin County in western Minnesota to live. Here they bought a 160 acre farm. It was a piece of prairie land with no buildings on it, and lay a mile or so to the east or northeast of my father's sister?s farm, known as the old Hopp place. A few miles to the southwest there was an 80 acre homestead for sale. It had a little house on it and as my parents needed a house right away, and land was quite cheap, they decided to buy this 80 acre place a1so. This little house became their first home, and is the house in which I was born. The little house was almost square with the front door near the southeast corner, and a wooden step at the entrance. On the side opposite to the front door was a chimney and back door which opened into a 1ittle shed where one could store fuel, and it also served to keep the northwest winds from blowing the snow in during the winter. The house had just one main room in it. In the northeast corner was a narrow stairway leading to an attic. The floor had a trap door leading into a cellar, which was just a dug-out place under the house. My father dug out enough to make a cellar and then he boarded it up with two by six inch planks.
    In 1930, when I visited my father, we drove up to Martin Co. to see the little house. It was about one hundred miles straight west from the place where my father now lives. We found the little house in very good condition and inhabited. The place was owned by wealthy land owners of Welcome, and
    renters were living on it. The little shed on the west side had been made into a kitchen, but otherwise very little change had been made. The cellar was still walled up with the two by six inch plank which my father had put in nearly fifty years before. The narrow little stairway for going up into the attic was still there, and the windows and doors were the same. How glad I am to have had this opportunity of seeing the house, because in February 1932, less than two years after we visited it, it burned down and its burning created considerable sensation because it probably was the oldest or at least one of the oldest houses in the country. The following clipping came out in the Welcome paper:
    House Burns on Jarchow Farm
    “The residence on the old Jarchow farm, four and a half miles north of Welcome, was destroyed by fire early today. Loss was estimated at $1,200. Alfred Goerndt, the tenant was at St. Paul with a load of hogs at the time of the fire. The origin had not been determined today. The farm, consisting of 120 acres, is owned by the Welcome Investment Company. It was once operated by Henry Wohlenhaus. The house was a small structure built many years ago.” The house stood on the northeast corner of the homestead. A couple of rods to the northeast of it my father had built stables for his cattle, and even today the weeds grow rank there showing where the stables once stood. The homestead was about twenty miles west of Winnebago, which was then the most important village in that country, and about eight miles northwest of the present town of Fairmont and three or four miles north of the present town of Welcome. The place is on the left side of the present highway, as you drive out to the north of Welcome, and a mile or more to the south of Elm Creek. Elm Creek was a small stream in those days, except in the spring of the year. It flowed through low marshy land to the east. A mile or two east of the homestead the marsh land looked like a great lake in the spring of the year. As one looks over the farms on which my father was starting his married life, the arrangement does not seem very convenient or encouraging, but no doubt it he had stayed there he would have bought and sold unti1 he succeeded in having his land all in one place. One day my father was returning from his sister?s place, and as he was crossing the Elm Creek Flat he noticed a great many silver poplar shoots just out of the ground, perhaps five or six inches high. He reached down and pulled up about four by the roots and took them home. When my mother saw them she was delighted, and taking her spade she planted them in a row south of the house. They grew, and today they stand there, tall, stately, and beautiful, as monuments to her efforts. She also planted several rows of willows on the north side of the place, some of the stumps and shoots of which are still there. It was customary to plant trees on the north side of the house and barns because it afforded a shelter and protection from the winter storms. The country is level with frequent little lakes or low lands, and no timber anywhere. Consequently everyone planted a few trees near his home, and today wherever there is a home it is surrounded by a few hand-planted trees.
    About a quarter of a mile from the little house where my parents started housekeeping lived their nearest neighbor, a family by the name of Schwartz; and about a mile and a half to the northeast lived my father's sister, Mrs. George Hopp. (Katherine Zimmerman Hopp) The grasshoppers had eaten up the people?s entire crop the year before my parents moved to Martin County. No one could remember of such a thing ever happening before.
    Their coming was a mystery. People could not understand where they came from or where they went. My father, like the rest of the farmers there, had faith in the country and sowed the seed again and tilled the soil hoping for a crop. The grasshoppers had left early in the fall, but before they 1eft, they had laid their eggs, and when the warm weather came the following spring there seemed to be millions of baby hoppers every where, who devoured every green thing. Even the leaves of the trees and bushes were not left unmolested. The only green plants not entirely destroyed were the garden-pea vines. It would not be possible to describe the desolation that they left behind. For weeks the people had not one green thing to eat. In those days there were no canned vegetables or fruit. Everyone craved food of this kind, and it was not to be had. This was the summer before I was born. My mother said that she had an unnatural appetite for vegetables, but there seemed to be no way to supply this much needed food. Then one day a letter came from Grandpa Krause saying that he was sending a wagonload of cabbage and rutabaga. My father drove in a lumber wagon to Winnebago, a distance of twenty miles to get these supplies. Mother said she could hardly wait for him to return. When he reached the railroad station and inquired about his supplies he was told that they were there, but when the depot agent went to get them they could not be found. Somebody had stolen them. Father hated to go back home with the wagon empty. He knew mother would be terribly disappointed, but there was nothing else to do. When she found out the truth she wept as if her heart would break. Pioneer life was never easy, but this was almost beyond endurance. When the crop was all devoured the grasshoppers left. People then had great hopes for a crop the coming year, because the grasshoppers left without laying their eggs. The following spring everybody put in another crop. How beautiful the fields looked, and what a wonderful harvest was promised! Then, suddenly one noticed the sky to the southwest getting dark and at first thought that a storm was gathering. Then suddenly, as the first few dropped down on the fields people realized what was happening. It seemed as if there were millions and millions of them. For several days they darkened the light of the sun; and again they ate the entire crop. Not a blade of grass or green thing was left. This made the third crop that had been destroyed by them. We know now that they visited the greater part of the central Western States, and that the crops in all these states were devoured in the same manner. People became discouraged. They had nothing to eat and no money to buy with. Where were they to get the seed to sow another crop? And if they did so would the grasshoppers appear again? Such were the questions that people were asking themselves everywhere. The price of land dropped to almost nothing. My father who had had six or seven hundred dollars to start with now had nothing. My parents decided to sell what they could and come back to grandpa Krause's place and help in the harvest fields. The grasshoppers did not molest that part of the state. It seemed that they visited only the prairie sections. I was a baby then, not a year old, and my aunt Anna, who was visiting us took me back to southeastern Minnesota to my grandparent„s. My father and mother followed soon afterward. They drove down in a wagon, and mother says that it was a hard experience because there were so few places where one could stay over night. Before sundown they were tired of driving and wanted to stop for the night, but as they could find no place to stay, kept on driving. Houses were long stretches apart. Finally when it was nearly eleven o'clock at night, they saw a little light in the distance and drove toward it. When they reached it and inquired if they might stay there until morning the lady hesitatingly refused. Mother was just too weary to go on, and as she spoke to my father, the lady of the house heard her voice, so she called out into the darkness and said “If you have a lady with you I will be glad to have you stay. I thought there were two men, but I would not send a lady on.” “Come and stay.” How glad they were to stay, and how grateful my mother was to her ever after. She told my parents that her husband was away, and that she was afraid to have strangers stay unless there was a lady with them.
    My parents spent the rest of the summer working in the harvest field. When there was no more work to do my father went back to Martin County and traded the homestead for a team of' horses, and sold the farm for seventy-five dollars. After having disposed of what few things he had, he hitched his horses to a wagon and returned to my grandpa Krause?s place, where my parents spent the winter. The next spring they bought a one-hundred-and-sixty acre homestead for twelve and one-half dollars per acre. This is the place where my brother Edward now lives. They broke up some of the land where there was no timber, cleared off the trees from another portion, and at the end of one year they raised two thousand bushels of wheat from sixty-eight acres, and sold it for one dollar per bushel. That made it possible for them to pay for one-half of their land in one year. They never again had such a crop. After that first year the chintz bugs bothered the crops for several years, then there were a number of years of drought, and then prices were not very good, and so something always interfered; but each year they always made their living and a little bit more. By raising horses, cattle, and hogs, there was always something that could be turned into money at the end of the year, even if the crops were not very good. As far as we know my father was the first person who ever owned this farm and lived on it, though it had been a homestead.
    When he bought it there were many beautiful springs on it, especially along the central valley running through the place from north to south. The largest springs were close to Deer Creek. On the bank below, where my Brother Edward's barn now stands, were the remains of' an old hut where someone, probably Mike Duffy, had lived for a time without owning the land. Deer Creek was a large stream in those days with an abundance of good fish in it. We seldom crossed it in the early days. The vegetation along Deer Creek and near the springs close to Deer Creek was so thick that one could hardly walk through it. Wild plums, wild grapes, choke cherries, wild gooseberries, wild currants, black haws, hop vines, wild cherries, and wild crabapples were to be found in great abundance. There were lots of black walnuts and butternuts, and hazel brush grew just everywhere. Among the thick vegetation one could find numberless varieties of shrubs, flowers, and trees. The stately beautiful elm, the box-elder, the basswood, ironwood, black walnut, butternut, and several varieties of oak were a few of the most common trees to be found there in those days. Wild flowers grew just as if there were one immense flower garden which extended everywhere. I have never 1ived anywhere where one could find such a great variety of flowers. Among the most common were the columbine or honeysuckle, the lady slipper, both yellow and purple, the goldenrod, the red lily, 1ack-in-the-pulpit, the fire ball, blood root, star of Bethlehem, wild cucumber, several kinds of violets and daisies, also buttercups and cowslips, and hundreds of others which I cannot now mention. No matter where yon looked along the roadside pretty faces of flowers were always there to greet you. Before the snow was completely gone the crocuses began to appear, and different kinds of flowers kept coming on all summer, and when the snow came in the fall it would seem that nature was not half through blooming, and was trying to crowd a great surplus of blossoms into the last of the season before snowy weather came on. Wild animals common in those days were the timber wolf, a small grey wolf something like a coyote only larger, the cottontail rabbit; the badger, striped gopher, and a few other small animals. We also bad rattlesnakes in the early days, but I never saw one because they were soon killed off. The prairie chicken and mourning dove were there in great abundance. Their call used to fill me with wonderment. I once found a prairie chicken's nest on my way home from school, in which there were seventeen eggs. How surprised I was at the big nest full of eggs, and how the old mother hen was fluttering around to detract my attention from the nest. There was a great variety of birds; more than in any other place in which I have lived. The robin stayed with us all summer, also the cat bird, the finch, and many others that I cannot now mention. We also had the chicken hawk and the crow. How little a place all these birds played in our life, then, but now they seem so important, as one thinks back to childhood days.
    In the spring of the year, and any time during the summer when there were heavy rains Deer Creek
    would overflow, and water would back up into the slough on my father's place. At such times the slough had quite a sufficiency of water of its own. The result was exciting for us. How the water would roar, and thunder, and carry on sometimes for several days. At such times the entire flat across Deer Creek would be under water and part of the Duffy Flat also. In those early days the land across Deer Creek was not pastured but was one great mass and tangle of wild vegetation so thick one could not walk in it without difficulty. Very well do I remember the many and sometimes almost hideous noises that emerged from those woods at night. Scarcely was the sun down when the night hawk made his appearance with his peculiar swishing cry; a little bit later came the call of the whip-poor-will. I used to wonder what kind of a bird he was, and why he never got tired, and why he was not afraid to make so much noise in those lonely woods. The bull frog too, added his hideous croaking during a part of the year, and could be heard ever so far. One might think that he was a tremendous fellow by the amount of noise he could make. The fireflies used to appear in great numbers, and on a dark night were very interesting. They never made any noise but were just appearing everywhere. You could never see them but their lights might appear in your hair or at your hands or feet. It was great fun to try to see them or follow them by their lights. In the fall and winter we always heard the howling of the wolves that seemed to come there for some reason. These woods always had a fascination for me, and I learned to love all these noises, even the howling of the wolves. Now I often wish that I could hear all these sounds over again. What a wild, beautiful music it would be. One often does not appreciate fully the wonderful grandeur of nature until one is without it for a while. In later years cattle were pastured here and destroyed the beautiful wildness. But even then; the water, the banks with their trees and shrubs hanging over the water's edge, and the big stately trees were always inspiring. This home of my childhood certainly was a beautiful spot, beautiful beyond description in those early days before all the natural wildness was destroyed. While my father was in the land office making arrangements to buy this piece of land another man came in to buy the same place. My father had beaten him by less than an hour. Many times since, we have rejoiced that he was not an hour later on that memorable day. My father kept adding to his farm until he had four hundred acres, which was almost more than he could manage, but he wanted sufficient land to keep his boys busy and with their help he handled it quite nicely.
    The house that my father built on this place was a rectangular building a story-and-a-half or two stories high. The upper story was not plastered for a number of years. The downstairs had one large room which was used for kitchen, dining room, and living room. There was also a pantry and bedroom where my parents slept. I slept in a trundle bed while I was real small. During the day this was shoved, under my parents' bed, and when it was bedtime it was rolled out and used. As soon as we were no longer babies we slept in wooden beds upstairs between feather beds in winter time. How lovely and warm these kept us in spite of the fact that the room was quite cold. In the summer time we slept under quilted quilts. For some reason my mother abandoned the idea of father beds altogether except while we were small children. The mattresses were home made. Bed ticking was sewed up leaving a slit in the center of the top; then the mattress was filled with corn husks. This had to be stirred and leveled every day. Making beds was not so easy a task as nowadays. The house was built on a hill or knoll less than a quarter of a mile from the spring. For a few years we carried all our water from the spring. Then came a season of years with a continual program of building and improving until we had stables for horses and cows, a granary, corn cribs, a barn, two wells, sheep sheds, chicken house, hog house, machine shed, and the house itself had to be added to several times; and finally when I was a young lady my folks rebuilt it completely, making a lovely big modern house of thirteen or fourteen rooms. What is now the front room of Brother Edward's house was the kitchen and living room of the old rectangular house. His front bedroom was the bedroom where my parents slept and where my trundle bed was kept. What is now the
    cellar hall was our pantry in the old house. The north half of what is now Edward's front porch was an enclosed summer kitchen and porch and woodshed. Many a time I have stood by that east window and looked out toward Mt. Tom and watched the wind blow the snow over the fields, longing to go out and play; but mother would so often say “It is too cold today, you had better not go out.” and the following day the snow would still be blowing; in fact many of the winter days were too cold and stormy for playing outside. While we were children our sport in winter time was sliding down hill on sleds, or making snow men, or snow houses, and in the summer time we played along the springs and creeks picking flowers or gathering pretty stones, or building little dams, or playing in the sand. But usually there were so many chores to do that when we were through with these we were glad to come to the house with the grownups. I remember one spring an unusual thing happened. A great abundance of warm rain came with the spring thaw. The result was a flood. The ice was lifted out of the creek bed for some distance up the stream, broken up into curious shapes, and carried and piled all over the Duffy Flat and our slough in tremendous heaps. Some piles projected up as high as a house, making the most wonderful display of ice that I have ever seen. It was a grand sight, and it took several weeks for all this ice to melt. It gave us unusual sport for a while. For a. number of years we raised our own sugar cane and had it made into sorghum. Cane was planted and cared for like corn, and while it was growing looked very much like a corn field. When it was ready to harvest the leaves were stripped off the stalks, then it was cut off near the ground and tied into bundles. These bundles we hauled to our neighbor, a Mr. Felch, who knew how to make sorghum. He had two rollers with a large square container underneath them. These rollers were made to turn by a horse pulling on a switch-pole to which he was hitched, and slowly he walked around in a circle. The switch-pole kept the rollers going. The cane was put between the rollers and the raw juice ran into the big square container below. The cane juice had to be boiled and skimmed several times until there was produced the thick golden-brown sorghum. The sorghum was put into barrels or kegs with faucets on them and put into the cellar or granary. Woe to the little youngster who turned on the faucet of the sorghum barrel and neglected to turn it off properly; because under such circumstances the sorghum would run down on the cellar floor, and not only be wasted but badly stick up the dirt floor of the cellar. We always used kerosene lanterns to work about the place after dark in those days, and if we drove anywhere on a dark night someone had to hold the lantern to try to light the way. In the house we used kerosene lamps. I remember the candle, but it was not in common use in those days. It had been replaced by the kerosene lamp. My grandparents had several molds for making candles but they hung in the cellar-way unused. Keeping the lantern and lamp globes clean was quite a task. No matter how careful one might be there was always danger of breaking them either while you were washing them, or if they were not properly rinsed they might break when the lamp was lighted. These globes had to be washed every day. Another task that was very tiresome was washing milk pails. They were made of wood and had to be scrubbed every day. The idea was to keep them white. When the first tin pails were used we thought it was a wonderful improvement over the old wooden pails. Wooden wash tubs too, were replaced by galvanized ones. That too was a great help because the wooden tubs would often have to stand with water in them for a few hours to swell them before they were ready to use.
    But pioneer days always come to an end and so it was here. The country was soon settled up. Woods were cut down and the land cleared for crops. Roads and bridges were built. Little schoolhouses and churches dotted the country everywhere. And as the younger children of the family came to their teens they knew little or nothing about the early days except what was told them. When my parents were
    first married they always used a wagon to get from place to place; but by the time I was eight or nine years old we always had a nice buggy. I remember one of the last of these buggies had a top with a fringe around it. We thought it was very beautiful. About this time instead of the large working horses we had one team of 1ighter weight horses for the buggy. We also had a single carriage for one horse. In winter time we had a cutter and sleigh bells when we did not want to use the bob sled. I remember well the first automobile that came into the country. I was a young lady then. All horses were afraid of it. When the owner met anyone he had to drive to the side of the road and stop until the team of horses had passed, because it was so easy to

  9. Ibid., p.40.
  10. Philip Zimmerman Family Bible.
  11. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED86, 436D.

    Zimmermon, Philip self age 29 Can Darmstadt Darmstadt Occ: Farmer
    Ernestine wife 27 Prussia Prussia Prussia Keeping House
    Anna dau 5 MN Can Prussia
    Julius son 3 " " "
    Albert son 2 " " "
    Larson Chris other 23 Norway Nor Nor works on farm

  12. Census, Federal - 1900 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp ED 37.
  13. Census, Federal - 1910 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED 35.
  14. Census, Federal - 1920 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Village, p. 10A.
    (9 Jan 1920)
  15. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
  16. Zimmerman History Packet Received from J. Rose 26 Feb 2005.
  17. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)), My Family p. 1.

    Chapter 3 MY PARENTS Page 1 MY PARENTS
    As long as my mother lived at home with her parents she had to be her father?s hired man, doing all kinds of hard work outside, which was not usually done by women. She had to help haul rock for making the foundations of the farm buildings, and as there were quite a number of these, and the foundations were large and high, rock hauling became a task which seemed to have no end. There was a house, a barn, a granary, a wood shed, a stone millhouse, and numerous other smaller buildings. Then too, there was wood to haul and cut, and manure to haul and spread, and of course, the regular work of the farm was always crowding on, such as the seeding, harvesting, thrashing, plowing, corn husking, and all the many other tasks that had to be done on the farm. With all this kind of work she had to help. It seemed that grandfather would never do a thing without taking her along. There was always lots of hard work, and never any time for pleasure, or doing the things that one liked to do. Vacations were unheard of in those days. My mother was very fond of all kinds of fancywork and sewing. Quilt piecing was quite a craze at that time, but there was never any time for anything like that in my grandfather's home. I have heard my mother tell of trying to piece quilt patches after she was supposed to be in bed. It was too bad that she could not have had an opportunity to do some of the things she 1iked to do, and that girls should have the opportunity of doing. She says she was glad to marry as it meant an opportunity for her to do as she liked and a measure of' freedom from a hard life.

  18. Philip Zimmerman Family Bible.
  19. Ibid.
  20. Ibid.
  21. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.

    [On Zimmerman Family Tree she is Annie.]

  22. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED86, 436D.

    Zimmermon, Philip self age 29 Can Darmstadt Darmstadt Occ: Farmer
    Ernestine wife 27 Prussia Prussia Prussia Keeping House
    Anna dau 5 MN Can Prussia
    Julius son 3 " " "
    Albert son 2 " " "
    Larson Chris other 23 Norway Nor Nor works on farm

  23. Zimmerman History Packet Received from J. Rose 26 Feb 2005.
  24. Allan Van Lehn, Van Lehn Gedcom.
  25. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)), p.4.

    (Anna Marie) was quite a prize because she was well educated, was a school teacher at 16 and school principal at age 27, was quite spiritual and religious, had a strong work ethic, was very accomplished in the domestic arts by virtue of being the oldest child, having to help her mother care for and raise her younger siblings. It has always been astounding that there was a 25 year age difference between grandma and the youngest child, my mother?s aunt Fern. Grandma helped grandpa in the church by organizing and running the ladies aid society, running the Sunday school, and even giving the sermon when grandpa was sick or away. Very few ministers? wives (unless pastors themselves) had the training or inclination to do what grandma did. One of grandma?s favorite causes was the appreciation of God?s creation: the mineral and vegetable, but especially the animal kingdom. She talked eloquently about the importance of being kind to animals. She was very fond of guinea pigs. ...

    Chapter 4, p. 14 FORDING the GULCH
    Soon after our arrival in Shelby arrangements were made for Fred to preach one Sunday at Chester and
    Lothair, and the next Sunday at Shelby. The Sunday that he was gone to Chester, I would take my baby
    on one arm and an ax and kindling in the other and go over to the church, sometimes through deep
    snowdrifts, to build a fire and then wait for Sunday school children to arrive. After Sunday school was
    over I would have to conduct the morning service. The surprising thing about that work was that there
    were usually about twenty men and only three or four women. The next Sunday Fred would keep the
    baby and do as I had done while I would go to preach in Chester and Lothair, and in this way we
    alternated the work all winter. In the spring the district superintendent wanted us to preach at Sweet
    Grass which was on the Canadian border 40 miles to the north, as a young student had filed on a claim
    near Chester, and could look after that work. Railroad connections were not very good to go to Sweet
    Grass so that brought on a problem.
    Shelby was anxious for us to stay in their town and built a parsonage for us, but the problem of
    living on the claim had to be solved. We were supposed to live on our claim about six months out of
    every year for three years. There seemed to be no solution. Finally we borrowed money from Fred's
    father and bought a Ford [model T]. We established a residence on our claim and drove about 150 miles
    every week-end, holding a church service at Sweet Grass every Sunday morning, at Shelby every Sunday
    evening, besides preaching at a school house or two on the way. When we held service at the Sweet
    Grass Hills School House, all the dinner that Fred would have time to eat on Sunday would be a sandwich
    as he drove. There was no time to stop to eat. This life was terribly wearing on Fred, but we did not
    realize it at the time. Of course, we encountered all kinds of difficulties and storms on these trips. On one
    trip to Chester our car stalled in the middle of a big poo1 of water which recent rain had formed and
    which it was impossible to avoid as the rai1road track was on one side and a high barbed-wire fence on
    the other. Fred had to take off his shoes and wade out and try to get a team of horses from the nearest
    farm house to pull us out. While he was gone a Great Northern passenger train passed and when the
    engineer and fireman saw us sitting in our car in the pool they reached out their hands to us in a most
    imploring manner. The situation must have looked ludicrous to them but not so to us. On another
    occasion high water had removed a bridge which crossed a deep gulch over which we had to pass. There
    were several narrow thick boards lying near by. Fred laid these across the gulch as far apart as the wheels
    of the car and drove across while I stood in front of the car to tell him that he was staying on the boards.
    Zimmerman Family History and Stories by Mrs. F. C. Nelson
    Chapter 4 MY LIFE Page 15
    We both held our breath, but got safely over. It was two o'clock in the morning. We did not reach our
    destination that night until nearly day-light.

  26. Ibid., p. 40.

    When the Chicago World's Fair was on, my parents decided to go. It was not possible for them to get away from the farm for more than a few days, but even that appealed to them. Our best farm paper at that time was “The Orange Judd Farmer.” The management had a little city of' cottages and tents where one could stay very reasonably and this is where my parents stayed. The fair was far beyond all their expectations. They thought it one of' the most wonderful expositions that could ever be displayed. When they returned they insisted on sending my two brothers and me, and had made all arrangements with Mr. Judd to be on the lookout for us when we got there. I was seventeen, Julius fifteen, and Albert thirteen. It was a great trip for three children to make alone and a great experience for us to have. We had never seen a city or crowds of people like these. The grounds were so immense that we could hardly keep track of ourselves, but we lived through it all, and got back home safely much wiser than when we went.

  27. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED86.
  28. Philip Zimmerman Family Bible.

    [Bible date looks like 29 Nov 1874]

  29. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED86, 436D.

    Zimmermon, Philip self age 29 Can Darmstadt Darmstadt Occ: Farmer
    Ernestine wife 27 Prussia Prussia Prussia Keeping House
    Anna dau 5 MN Can Prussia
    Julius son 3 " " "
    Albert son 2 " " "
    Larson Chris other 23 Norway Nor Nor works on farm

  30. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
  31. Zimmerman History Packet Received from J. Rose 26 Feb 2005.
  32. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)), Ch 6; p 2.

    In the year 1935 on Monday
    the eleventh of November my brother Julius, then living in Spring Valley, Minnesota passed away. A few
    days previous to this, he had been leading a young heifer along the paved highway. She was a rather
    unruly animal and finally succeeded in throwing him on the edge of the pavement. The result of this was
    a broken rib and a punctured lung. He was taken to Rochester, Minnesota, and put under the care of the
    Mayo doctors, but lived only a short time. ... He
    was fifty nine years old and was living with my father at the time. He had never married.

  33. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED86, 436D.
  34. Philip Zimmerman Family Bible.
  35. Ibid.
  36. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
  37. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED86, 436D.

    Zimmermon, Philip self age 29 Can Darmstadt Darmstadt Occ: Farmer
    Ernestine wife 27 Prussia Prussia Prussia Keeping House
    Anna dau 5 MN Can Prussia
    Julius son 3 " " "
    Albert son 2 " " "
    Larson Chris other 23 Norway Nor Nor works on farm

  38. Zimmerman History Packet Received from J. Rose 26 Feb 2005.
  39. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)), Ch. 6; p. 3.

    My brother Albert who had bought one of
    my father's farms northeast of Frankford, Minnesota, sold that place and retired from active farm work
    not long before he was seventy years old. His health was very bad and he was almost an invalid for a
    number of years. He suffered from the results of a bad injury which he received while he was still in his
    teens. I mentioned this in a former chapter. He also had several operations for cancer of the prostate
    gland. When he left the farm he moved into the home in Spring Valley which my parents had built and
    which now belongs to my sisters. We had hoped that the doctors might be able to help him, but on the
    twelfth of December 1951 he passed peacefully away after a long hard illness, at the age of 73. ...Albert was always a kind and
    dear man and will be missed greatly by his many friends and relatives, especially his sisters and his
    brother.

  40. Ibid., p. 32.

    My brother, Albert, had a serious accident the fall that [Williams Jennings] Bryan was running for president on the “16 to 1” platform. As the brothers were returning from q political rally the horse ran away and threw the boys out, breaking Albert's leg near the hip, and injured him otherwise so that he never completely recovered. He was in bed for months, at first hovering between life and death. Then the knitting of the bone was not as it should be and was a problem to the doctors for weeks. It was a long and painful siege of sickness but in due time he did get better.

  41. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED86.
  42. Philip Zimmerman Family Bible.

    [Bible date looks like 29 Apr 1878]

  43. Ibid.
  44. Zimmerman History Packet Received from J. Rose 26 Feb 2005.
  45. Philip Zimmerman Family Bible.
  46. Ibid.
  47. Census, Federal - 1900 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp ED 37, p. 8B.
    (Jun 1900)
  48. Census, Federal - 1910 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED 35, p. 1B.
    (30 Apr 1910)
  49. Census, Federal - 1920 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp ED34, p. 5B.
    (22 Jan 1920)
  50. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
  51. Zimmerman History Packet Received from J. Rose 26 Feb 2005.
  52. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)), Ch. 6; p. 3.

    My brother Edward, who bought the beautiful home where I spent my childhood days, sold the
    place in 1943 and bought a home in Minneapolis, Minnesota where he now lives. The old home that he
    sold has lost most of its wild beauty and charm but is still attractive to me because of the old memories
    that it always brings back. His two sons, Charles and Dean, are both married and have families of their
    own.

  53. Census, Federal 1930, Spring Valley, Fillmore, Minnesota.

    Name: Edward W Zimmerman
    Gender: Male
    Birth Year: abt 1887
    Birthplace: Minnesota
    Race: White
    Home in 1930: Spring Valley, Fillmore, Minnesota
    Map of Home: View Map
    Marital Status: Married
    Relation to Head of House: Head
    Spouse's Name: Tressa A Zimmerman
    Father's Birthplace: Canada
    Mother's Birthplace: Germany
    Occupation: Farmer

    Education:

    Military service:

    Rent/home value:

    Age at first marriage:

    Parents' birthplace:
    View Image
    Neighbors: View others on page
    Household Members: Name Age
    Edward W Zimmerman 43
    Tressa A Zimmerman 38
    Charles E Zimmerman 15
    Marie E Zimmerman 11
    Dean T Zimmerman 8

  54. Census, Federal 1940, Spring Valley, Fillmore, Minnesota.

    Name: Edward Zimmerman
    Respondent: Yes
    Age: 54
    Estimated Birth Year: abt 1886
    Gender: Male
    Race: White
    Birthplace: Minnesota
    Marital Status: Married
    Relation to Head of House: Head
    Home in 1940: Spring Valley, Fillmore, Minnesota
    Map of Home in 1940: View Map
    Inferred Residence in 1935: Spring Valley, Fillmore, Minnesota
    Residence in 1935: Same House
    Resident on farm in 1935: Yes
    Sheet Number: 2A
    Number of Household in Order of Visitation: 21
    Occupation: Farmer
    House Owned or Rented: Owned
    Value of Home or Monthly Rental if Rented: 1000
    Attended School or College: No
    Highest Grade Completed: College, 1st year
    Hours Worked Week Prior to Census: 60
    Class of Worker: Working on own account
    Weeks Worked in 1939: 52
    Income Other Sources: Yes
    Neighbors: View others on page
    Household Members: Name Age
    Edward Zimmerman 54
    Teresa Zimmerman 48

  55. Philip Zimmerman Family Bible.
  56. Census, Federal - 1900 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp ED 37, p. 8B.
    (Jun 1900)
  57. Census, Federal - 1910 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED 35, p. 1B.
    (30 Apr 1910)
  58. Census, Federal - 1920 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Village, 10A.
    (9 Jan 1920)
  59. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
  60. Zimmerman History Packet Received from J. Rose 26 Feb 2005.
  61. Gordon N. Zimmerman correspondence.

    [received 21 Nov 2005.]

  62. Ibid.

    [received 21 Nov 2005.
    Gordon added the place of death.]

  63. Philip Zimmerman Family Bible.
  64. Census, Federal - 1900 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp ED 37, P. 8B.
    (Jun 1900)
  65. Census, Federal - 1910 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED 35, p. 1B.
    (30 Apr 1910)
  66. Census, Federal - 1920 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Village, p. 10A.
    (9 Jan 1920)
  67. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
  68. Zimmerman History Packet Received from J. Rose 26 Feb 2005.
  69. Gordon N. Zimmerman correspondence.

    [From correspondence received 21 Nov 2005.]

  70. Ibid.

    [From correspondence received 21 Nov 2005.]

  71. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
  72. Zimmerman History Packet Received from J. Rose 26 Feb 2005.
  73. Gordon N. Zimmerman correspondence.

    [received 21 Nov 2005]

  74. Social Security Death Index.
  75. Philip Zimmerman Family Bible.
Surnames | Index

Revised: November 26, 2016