Husband: Johann Peter Zimmerman (1)
Born: 11 Dec 1773 in Altheim, Germany
Married: 20 Feb 1800 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse (21)
Died: 07 Jul 1852 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Germany
Father: Johann Bernhard Zimmerman
Mother: Anna Sybilla Appel
Spouses:
Wife: Anna Catherina Sauerwein (2)
Born: 12 Jan 1778 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse
Died: 14 Feb 1853 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse
Father:
Mother:
Spouses:
Children
01 (M): Johann Christian Zimmerman (3 4 5 6 7)
Born: 27 Aug 1800 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany (8 9 10 11)
Died: 1851 in Sebringville, Ontario, Canada
Spouses: Elizabeth Dorothea Knoll, Kneil Knell
02 (F): Anna Maria Zimmerman (12 13)
Born: 1804
Died: 21 Sep 1806
Spouses:
03 (M): Johann Peter Zimmerman (14 15)
Born: 1807 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Germany
Died: 09 Dec 1810 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Germany
Spouses:
04 (M): Johann Valentin Zimmerman (16 17)
Born: 11 Jan 1810 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Germany
Died: 27 Aug 1837 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Germany
Spouses: >>>
05 (M): Johann Heinrich Zimmerman (18 19)
Born: 14 Sep 1815 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Germany
Died:
Spouses: >>>
06 (M): Johann Nicolaus Zimmerman (20)
Born: 10 Oct 1817 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse
Died: 08 Jun 1896 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse
Spouses:
Additional Information

Johann Peter Zimmerman:

Notes:

From History of Zimmerman Family in Altheim - Johann Peter Zimmerman had only a small rural property which consisted of a two-story house, barn, cow-barn, pig pen, ten and one-half morgan field, two morgen meadows; worth of property was 960 florins. Of Peter Zimmerman's ten children, two drowned in the stream behind the house: Anna Maria,- born 1804 and drowned September 21, 1806; and Johann Peter, born 1807 and died December 9, 1810.

(02) Anna Maria Zimmerman:

Cause of Death: Drowned

Notes:

Drowned in the stream behind her house at Hauptstraze 35.

(03) Johann Peter Zimmerman:

Cause of Death: Drowning

Notes:

Drowned in the stream behind his house at Hauptstraze 35

Footnotes
  1. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983 ).

    Johann Peter Zimmerman, born December 11, 1773 and died July 7, 1852 in Altheim. He left ten children. (Family book II, page 66.) Of them, Johann Christian, born August 17, 1800, went to Canada in May of 1832....The brother, Johann Heinrich Zimmerman, born September 14, 1815, fololowed in 1837...

    The two sons that remained in Altheim have descendants, Johann Valentin Zimmerman, born January 11, 1810 and died August 27, 1837, stayed in the same house at Haupstraze 35. The father, Johann Peter Zimmerman had only a samall rural property which consisted of a two-story house, barn cow-barn, pig pen, ten and one-half Morgen field, two morgen meadows; worth of property was 960 florins.

    Of Peter Zimmerman's ten children, two drowned in the stream behind the house: Anna Maria, born 1804 and drowned September 21, 1806; and Johann Peter, born 1807 and died December 9, 1810.

  2. Ancestry.com, The_Appel_Kelly_Hennessy Tree owner: George Appe.
  3. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
    (1958)
  4. Goettel, Steve Lloyd, Britzius, Zimmerman, Maurer Research.
  5. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)).

    Zimmerman Family History and Stories by Mrs. F. C. Nelson Chapter 1 MY FATHER' S PARENTS Page 2 Modes of communication and travel were difficult in those days, and it was a very easy matter to get out of touch with one's relatives. Although the older brother lived only fifty miles away, we know very little about his family. He frequently came down to visit my grandfather, and after my grandfather's death, sometimes visited the family. My father remembers seeing him when he was down on one of those visits, but as my father was only about five years old his recollections of what he said and did are not very vivid. My grandfather?s brother Henry was a cabinetmaker by trade and during the long winters made such furniture as he could use or sell. He made a very wonderful bureau with secret drawers for keeping his money. Banks were not much used in those days, and hiding places for money were always in demand. In some way this piece of furniture came into the possession of my father's brother, Henry. My father?s brother, Henry, also had a table made by him. It was a wonderful piece of work, and took the prize at a provincial fair or show, where Uncle Henry became very much interested in it, and bought it after the show was over. Uncle Henry's daughter, Lydia, remembers this furniture well. My grandfather's brother Henry had a family. There was a boy, Dan, who was a very fine penman which was quite an accomplishment in those days. We also know there were several daughters in the family. On the ocean voyage which was long and tedious, my grandfather met a young lady six years younger than himself, who came from the same part of Germany from which he had come; in fact, she was from a neighboring village, probably Spltzaltheim. Her name was Elizabeth Knell. Her father was dead and her mother was a widow with a family. The mother was very much opposed to her daughter coming to America alone. She feared that she would never see her child again, but E1izabeth was determined and eager to come and try to earn a small fortune. She thought in America money could be earned quickly and easily. She told her mother not to feel bad, that she wou1d soon be back with a nice little sum of money to help the fatherless family along; but she never went back. In later years she often spoke to her children of her brother Philip, who seems to have been an exceedingly clever and successful man. Her mother and grandmother lived to be very old; both reaching the ripe old age of about ninety years. My grandfather fell in love with this young woman on the ocean voyage. They both came to the same part of Canada and after a time were married. They complied with the custom of those days that a wedding must be announced for three successive Sundays in the Church before the young people could be married. They were very devoted to each other and their wedded life was exceedingly happy. She was a great help to her husband not only in making a happy home for him, but also in clearing the timber from the land. She helped him pile and burn brush, and sometimes get the logs off the land, and did whatever else there was to do that a woman could do. She was always well and happy and busy, being an industrious type of woman. She was of medium size and weight, with slightly rounded shoulders. In her later years she became decidedly round-shouldered. Her eyes were very dark blue, and her hair a very dark brown, almost black. Her hair never turned grey even in her last days. My grandfather had brown eyes, dark hair, and very pretty rosy cheeks with a nice clear complexion, better than most women have. He was not skinny, but was a slender man of medium height and weight. They were both devoted Christians, and had a simple, beautiful faith in God, similar to that of other Christian people of their time. One Sunday during a heavy storm the wind was beating the rain into the barn where the freshly thrashed grain was lying. My grandmother, after watching the storm for a while, suggested that they had better go out and try to keep the grain dry; but my grandfather thought that they ought not to break God's Sabbath by doing manual labor. He suggested that God knew that they needed the grain, and if He wished them to have it He would save the crop without their breaking His Holy Sabbath Day. Zimmerman Family History and Stories by Mrs. F. C. Nelson Chapter 1 MY FATHER' S PARENTS Page 3
    In Germany they were Lutherans, but in Canada they joined the German Evangelical Church, and in this church they trained their children in Christian living, and in the doctrines of religion. All their children joined the church and lead Christian lives, probably much above the average. My grandfather was not a very good sportsman, not having had an opportunity for such things in his youth. In Europe this privilege was reserved for the wealthy landlords. But in Canada there was an abundance of deer for all, and other wild game was very plentiful. He seldom shot anything even if the deer fed on his garden. One day a big deer came into the yard and with an old rusty gun he shot it. But the gun gave him such a kick and he felt so bad seeing the beautiful animal lying dead before him that he never tried shooting again. My grandparents built a log cabin on their place. It had two windows and on one side an addition which they used for a summer cook-house. This abode was their happy home. In the winter time they would clear the land of brush and timber; and in the summer they would raise their crop. After the grain was hauled into the barn and thrashed, my grandfather would spend an hour or two daily during the fall, throwing grain. This was the method used to remove the chaff. Some years later they sold two acres of their farm, one for the erection of a blacksmith shop and the other to build a tailor shop. Then a school house was built across from the little log house and a short distance down the road. The little village of Sebringville grew up about a quarter of a mile from the school house. My grandparents had a family of five boys and two girls. Henry, the oldest boy married Mary Krusp. Adam, the second boy, married Eve Hopp; and for his second wife Elizabeth Britzius. Peter, the third boy, married Katherine Rhiel. Christian, the fourth boy, married Louise Nolte and Philip, my father, who was the youngest of the family, married Ernstine Krause. Katherine, the oldest girl, married George Hopp; and the younger daughter, Elizabeth (Betsie), married Christ Regal. Adam and Katherine both married into the same Hopp family, and had a double wedding at Preston, Minnesota. Betsie died at the birth of her first child, the child dying also. None of the boys ever smoked, or drank intoxicating liquors, or used profane language of any kind. They did not even use slang expressions. They believed in saying yea and nay as the bible teaches. It would have been hard to find a finer Christian family anywhere.
    My father was the youngest of the family. He was born January 10, 1851. That spring when the plum trees were in bloom, which must have been in May or June, my grandfather (Christian Zimmerman) died. He was only about 38 years old. For almost a week he had been busy building a dam which necessitated his standing in cold water and mud most of the time while at his work. This brought about his death. He was sick only three or four days. I do not know what doctors would say caused his death. I only know the building of the dam was responsible for it. He was buried in the old Sebringville cemetery with a wooden tombstone on the grave, but now the exact spot of the grave is not known. About forty years ago, probably about 1890, the old cemetery which was back of the Sebringville church was moved to higher ground because the graves filled with water. Such graves as had no one interested in them were abandoned. There were no relatives of my grandfather living there when this was done, so those who might have been interested did not even learn of the change until long after it had been made. So the body was never moved, but lies somewhere in the old cemetery which has been abandoned. Who knows, but it may also be petrified. It is an interesting fact that of the bodies moved, three or four were found perfectly petrified which often happens when bodies are buried in low ground. At the time of grandfather's death the older boys were fourteen and thirteen, and my father who was the youngest was only five or six months old. Very sad and lonely hours followed the breaking up of the once so happy home.

    p.10 The church formed a council of which a man by the name of John Kastner was one of the leading men. The council decided that most of the property should go to the oldest boy, Henry, which was an English custom, and that the other boys should help Henry until they were sixteen, and go to school six months out of every year.

  6. Gordon N. Zimmerman correspondence.
  7. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983).

    History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim


    Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman
    written in response to Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983
    translated by Mrs. Gerald Cleveland of Spring Valley , MN


    There have been many families named Zimmerman from the Thirty Years War till modern times. Most were small farmers, or master wheelwrights, master carpenters, or master weavers. Through several generations, they lived in different houses in the village at Hauptstraze (street) 14, 34, 58, 35; Kirchstraze 11, 23, 25, 33, 35; Baben Hauserstraze 1, 3, and Kreuzstraze 8 and 10. Today there are no more Zimmerman families in Altheim.

    When many inhabitants emigrated in the last century, two families from the Zimmerman circle, and a few single people, also left their hometown of Altheim and emigrated. One family Johann Peter Zimmerman (Family Book II, page 80) went to Slavonia and Yugoslavia, and one family, Leonhard Zimmerman (Family Book II, page 272) went to North America. Among the single people, Johann Christian Zimmerman from Altheim, Hauptstraze 35 (Haag) went to Canada in May of 1832. His brother, Johann Heinrich, followed him in 1837. Elizabeth Dorothea Knoll from Altheim, Hauptstraze 17 (Hergert) emigrated with Johann Christian Zimmerman in May 1832. The two married on their new farm in Canada. Christian Zimmerman, born August 27, 1800, died in 1851 in Canada. His wife, Elizabeth Zimmerman, maiden name Knoll, born January 30, 1809 in Altheim, died October 18, 1888 in Preston, Minnesota, U.S.A., on the Adam Zimmerman farm. A great grandson, Rolland Zimmerman, R.R. #1 Box 26, Racine, Minnesota, 55961, U.S.A., came to Altheim with his family in October, 1983, to visit the hometown of his ancestors. He also visited the house at Hauptstraze 35 from which his great grandfather emigrated with his brothers. His visit gave cause to research the history of the Zimmerman family in Altheim and to record it.

    A Hans Zimmerman is mentioned in Altheim as early as 1558. Due to war, hunger and disease only about 120 of the 360 inhabitants of Altheim remained alive in the Thirty Years War(1618-1648). A Paulus Zimmerman survived the war, a magistrate (but from his handwork, a weaver). He was buried on April 11, 1666. One of his sons could have been Nikolaus Zimmerman of whom descendants still live at Kirchstraze 23 and 33.

    A Johann Peter Zimmerman about 1648 was most probably a son of Paulus Zimmerman, because he was also a magistrate in 1682, and later a village mayor. He died July 20, 1705 at the age of 57. In 1680 he, like other husbandmen (farmers), was assessed a tax of 70 florins, but he was not very able to pay. He owned a poor home, the worth of which amounted to only 30 florins. The worth of his land was 165 florins, and for livestock he had two pair of bad (poor) horses, one cow, one-year-old ox, three pigs. (A good beginning nonetheless, considering the poverty after the war.) In addition 25 florins borrowed from the church building and ten from the parsonage. He had five children. (Family Book I, page 64).

    The wife of the emigrant Christian Zimmerman from Altheim, Hauptstraze 35, was Elizabeth Knoll, who likewise came from Altheim. She came from the house at Hauptstraze 27 (today Hergert), therefore only a few houses farther on the same side of the street. Elizabeth Knoll emigrated to Canada in May of 1832 as did Christian Zimmerman. Therefore they did not become acquainted on the emigrant ship as descendants assumed, rather they must have decided together, back in Altheim, to emigrate to Canada. Elizabeth Knoll was born in Altheim. In earlier times, Altheim was also called Spitzaltheim, because the church in Altheim had a high pointed (spitzen) tower. Elizabeth Dorothea Knoll was born January 30, 1809, and died October 18, 1888 on the Adam Zimmerman farm in the U.S.A. at Preston in Minnesota, allegedly at the age of 76 years, 9 months. Her father in Altheim was Johann Adam Knoll, born October 21, 1778 in Klein-Umstadt (a neighboring village) son of Andread Knoll and Susanne Marg, nee Strumfels. He died in Altheim on January 26, 1806. He married Anne Margarethe, nee Schodt, in Altheim on June 2, 1808. She was from Altheim Hauptstraze 27. Of the eight brothers and sisters of Johann Adam Knoll, two died while yet children, three girls married into families from Altheim, Schaatheim and Harpertshau. Johann Adam Knoll was born August 30, 1813, and remained in the house and continued the line. The oldest daughter, Elizabeth Dorothea Knoll went, according to the traditions of the descendants, to Canada to help out the fatherless
    family with money. The father died at age 48 in 1826. However Knoll family was not without means at that time. Her mother's parents owned what for Altheim was quite a good piece of property at Hauptstraze 27. The parents, Philipp Schodt, born 1738, and Anna Margarethe Schodt, (married 1760) had two sons. Johann Martin and Johann Philipp who married someone from outside Altheim. The daughter, Anna Margarethe Schodt, stayed in her parents home and married Johann Adam Knoll from Klein Umstadt. In 1804 the property consisted of a two story house (that still stands today and has an arched gate), a barn and stable, on fourth Morgen (a measure of land six to nine tenths of an acre) garden, thirty four Morgen fields, three and three-fourths Morgen meadows, value of the property 200 florins. In 1848 the property was passed on to the son (inherited) who was again called Johann Adam Knoll, born August 29, 1813, and married Katherine Elizabeth Appell on June 12, 1836 (first wife). The son, Johann Nikolaus Knoll I took over the house and farm in 1871. His son was Johann Nikolaus Knoll II. His oldest daughter, Anna Marie Knoll, born February 5, 1817 married the farmer, Friedrich Heinrich Funck, who died at an advanced age, and passed the property on to the Hergert family. The farm yard had 617 sq. meters and the meadow 428 sq. M.

    It is understandable that from the many children in the family, two sons would decide to emigrate. At that time poverty ruled in the villages and there was a great lack of opportunities for work. The small farming businesses were not in a position to support families with many children.

    The son who remained in the house, Johann Valentin (Family Book II, page 259) had two daughters and one son. The son, Johann Nickolaus, born February .21, 1859 and died April 10, 1916, remained again in the house. (Family Book III, page 74). On February 9, 1873 he married Marie Gobel, born August 22, 1848, and died April 2, 1924. The three children were Katharine, born October 21, 1873; Elise, born June 10, 1879, and Johann Georg, born October 5, 1882.

    Georg Zimmerman, born October 5, 1881, died October 12, 1960 in Altheim. (Family Book III, page 232) George was the last descendant in the Zimmerman family line. On April .14, 1912 he married Friederike

    Funck, born July 1, 1885 in Hergershausen. She died July 2, 1960.They left two daughters, Elizabeth Zimmerman, born April 6, 1913 and died January 12, 1962, and Katharina, born September 13, 1914. Katha Haag, nee Zimmerman, still lives to day in the parent house of the Zimmerman family at Altheim, Haupstraze 35. On December 19, 1942 she married Jakob Haag, a civil servant, who died December 26, 1974.

    In 1907, Nikolaus Zimmerman had the old half-timbered house torn down, and the present house built with attic and superstructure over the gate, finished on the outside with rock or brick. In 1973, the sonin-law, Karl Hunkel, gained extra living space by adding a construction over the gatehouse. In the upper story, Karl Hunkel and his wife Hildegard, nee Haag, and their children Regina, Matthias and Carmen, live. The yard has 621 square meters, the meadow and grassed area behind it has 767 square meters.

    "What you inherit from your fathers you must pass on in order to keep."

    "And I heard a voice from heaven say to me: 'Write: Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, Father, Master from now on. The spirit speaks, that they rest from their work, because their works follow them."'

    Of the five children of Johann Peter Zimmerman, the three sonst Johann Peter, Nickel Matthias, and Andreas left numerous descendants. These can be followed in a tabular summary.

    We are interested in the line of Nickel Matthias Zimmerman, which stretches into the present.

    Nickel Matthias Zimmerman was born October 16, 1677 and died April 13, 1731. He had seven children. (Family Book I, page 66.) Of the two sons, Johann Jost Zimmerman continues the line.

    6. Johann Jost Zimmerman, born. August 23, 1713 and died January, 1792 (Family Book I, page 66a), had four children. Of his-two sons, Johann Bernhard continues the line.

    5. Johann Bernhard Zimmerman, born June 2, 1743 and died April 19, 1800. Married on September 17, 1772 in the house of Johann Valentin Appel at Hauptstraze 35, and was "coupled'' with his daughter, Anna Sybilla. Johann Valentin Appel and Anna Sybilla, nee Appel, had seven children. Anna died in childbirth with the seventh child, who was born dead. Bernhard Zimmerman married four more times: 1783, 1793, 1799 and 1802. From the first marriage, Johann Peter Zimmerman continues the line.

    4. Johann Peter Zimmerman, born December 11, 1773 and died July 7, 1852 in Altheim. He left ten children. (Family Book II, page 66.) Of them, Johann Christian Zimmerman, born August 17, 1800 went to Canada, in May of 1832. Elizabeth Knoll from Hauptstraze 27, born January 30, 1809, emigrated with him to America. They did not first become acquainted on the ship as assumed by descendants, but rather already knew one another in Altheim. The brother, Johann Henrich Zimmerman, born September 14, 1815 followed in 1837. He was not older as assumed by descendants, but fifteen years younger. Both brothers received a farm with 100 acres of land in Canada from the English government near Sebringville in Ontario.

    The two sons that remained in Altheim have descendants, Johann Valentin Zimmerman, born January 11, 1810 and died August 27, 1837, stayed in the same house at Hauptstraze 35. The father, Johann Peter Zimmerman had only a small rural property which consisted of a two-story house, barn, cow-barn, pig pen, ten and one-half morgan field, two morgen meadows; worth of property was 960 florins. Of Peter Zimmerman's ten children, two drowned in the stream behind the house: Anna Maria,- born 1804 and drowned September 21, 1806; and Johann Peter, born 1807 and died December 9, 1810."
    translated by Mrs. Gerald Cleveland of Spring Valley

  8. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED86.
  9. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983 ).
  10. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED86.
  11. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983).
  12. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983 ).
  13. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983).
  14. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983 ).
  15. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983).
  16. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983 ).
  17. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983).
  18. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983 ).
  19. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)).

    Modes of communication and travel were difficult in those days, and it was a very easy matter to get out of touch with one's relatives. Although Henry lived only fifty miles from Christian, we know very little about his family. We do know that Henry came quite frequently to visit Christian and his family, even after Christian's death. Henry was a cabinet maker by trade, and during the long winters he made such furniture as he could use or sell. He made a very wonderful bureau with secret drawers for keeping his money. Banks were not much used in those days, hiding places for money were always in demand. In some way or other this piece of furniture came into the possession of Christian's son, Henry. Henry also had a table made by his uncle, Henry. It was a wonderful piece of work, and took the prize at a provincial fair or show.

    We know that Christian's brother had a family. There was a boy named Dan who was a very fine penman, which was quite an accomplishment in those days. There were also several daughters in the family.

  20. Ancestry.com, The_Appel_Kelly_Hennessy Tree; Owner: George Appel.
  21. Ibid., The_Appel_Kelly_Hennessy Tree owner: George Appe.
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Revised: November 26, 2016