Husband: Johann Christian Zimmerman (1 2 3 4 5)
Born: 27 Aug 1800 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany (6 7 8 9)
Married: 1832 in Sebringville, Ontario, Canada (67)
Died: 1851 in Sebringville, Ontario, Canada
Father: Johann Peter Zimmerman
Mother: Anna Catherina Sauerwein
Spouses:
Wife: Elizabeth Dorothea Knoll, Kneil Knell (10 11 12 13 14)
Born: 30 Jan 1809 in Altheim, Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany
Died: 18 Oct 1888 in Adam Zimmerman Farm, Fillmore Co, MN (15)
Father: Johann Adam Knoll
Mother: Anne Margarethe Schodt
Spouses:
Children
01 (M): Henry Zimmerman (16 17 18 19 20)
Born: 16 Feb 1835 in Sebringville, Ontario, Canada (21 22)
Died: about 1909 in Canby, Clackamas, OR (23 24)
Spouses: Mary E. Crasp, Krusp
02 (M): Adam Zimmerman (25 26 27 28 29 30 31)
Born: 02 Jun 1837 in Stratford, Ontario, Canada (32)
Died: 03 Apr 1899 in Canby, Clackamas, OR (33)
Spouses: Eve Hopp; Elizabeth Britzius
03 (F): Katherine Zimmerman (34 35 36 37 38)
Born: 1839 in Sebringville, Ontario, Canada
Died: Nov 1875 in Minnesota (39)
Spouses: George M. Hopp
04 (M): Peter Zimmerman (40 41 42 43 44 45)
Born: 02 Aug 1842 in Canada (46)
Died: 06 Feb 1894 in Racine, Mower, Minnesota (47)
Spouses: Catherine Riehl
05 (M): Christian Zimmerman (48 49 50 51 52 53)
Born: 22 Aug 1848 in Sebringville, Perth Co., Ontario, Canada (54)
Died: 17 Aug 1934 in Yamhill, OR (55)
Spouses: Louisa Sophia Nolte
06 (F): Elizabeth Zimmerman (56)
Born:
Died:
Spouses: Christ Regal
07 (M): Philip Zimmerman (57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65)
Born: 10 Jan 1851 in Sebringville, Perth Co., Ontario, Canada
Died: 21 Aug 1941 in Spring Valley, Fillmore, Minnesota (66)
Spouses: Ernestine Krause
Additional Information

Johann Christian Zimmerman:

Buried: Methodist Cemetery, Preston, MN

Notes:


1)From History of Zimmerman Family in Altheim "Both brothers (Johann Christian and Johann Heinrich)received a farm with 100 acres of land in Canada from the English government near Sebringville in Ontario." They emigrated to Canada in 1832. (Sebringville is now part of Toronto. DZS-2005)

2)The Christian Zimmerman Story by Dianne Z. Stevens

11 October 2013

Dear Children,

Tonight we will continue with the story of my father's people with the story of the Zimmermans from earliest times up through our immigrant Zimmerman ancestor and beyond. I will be referring frequently to the marvelous Zimmerman History written by my first cousin two times removed, Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson (b. 1874). This is how she summed up the Zimmermans:

The Zimmermans did not as a rule die young. They had a great deal of vitality and resistance...They all had nice hair and did not turn gray until late in life....They were all of very good disposition except for a slight touch of severity which I noticed in my father's two oldest brothers. (Oh, Oh! Our line is the second brother!) ... Financially they were all quite successful, as they all had their own homes and a good living, and such conveniences as a family might need, and enough set aside for their old age. They were prosperous, but never stingy, not one of them. ... They were all fond of home life, and children and rather discounted entertainments and amusements.

Another person to whom we are grateful in searching out our Zimmerman history is my second cousin once removed, Rolland Lawrence Zimmerman (b. 1904). In 1983 Rolland and some of his family decided to visit Germany and see what they could find out about their Zimmerman ancestors. He had a letter written in 1905 by the above named Anna saying our Zimmermans had come to Canada in 1834 from Altheim, Germany, a town that had a church with a very high steeple. Unfortunately, Rolland discovered there are ten Altheims in Germany. Which one? He wrote to the central Lutheran church in Germany and asked in which Altheim was there a church with a very high steeple in the year 1834. Here is the rest of the story retold by Gordon Zimmerman, another second cousin, one time removed:

With this information Rolland went to Germany and visited the first two churches on the list. (In) these two Altheims in different states no Zimmermans could be found. He then hired another interpreter and went to Altheim in the state of Hessen. There was a note on the Parrish door saying (the pastor) would be back in one hour. So Rolland went to the town cemetery. He found Zimmermans all over the cemetery. He went back to the Parrish house and was told by the young pastor that there were no Zimmermans that were attending church there at that time. Rolland told him about all the Zimmermans in the cemetery. (The pastor) advised he had only been there a short time and the name was unfamiliar to him.

Rolland and his interpreter were crestfallen. All the time and money he had spent on this project were for nothing. Just as he got to the front gate of the little yard a car drove up. It was the former pastor. When he was asked if there had ever been any Zimmermans in that church (the pastor) replied, "Zimmermans - you have eight to ten women in this church that were gebornen Zimmermans, probably more than any other family if you go back a few generations." (There were probably only women) as so many male children were killed in the war.

This pastor was Pfarrer Walter. He spent much time going over all the record books kept in the old Altheim Lutheran Church and several weeks after Rolland returned home Pfarrer Walter sent Rolland copies of Zimmerman records going back to the 1500's. Part of his letter is in my sources for this chapter.

This Altheim is in the German state of Hesse. Sometimes it's written Hessen. People have been living in Hesse for 50,000 years. “Hessian” refers to the people who live in Hesse, the dialect of German

spoken in Hesse, and also to the soldiers that originally came from Hesse, but later from all over Germany, and were rented out to whatever European army needed manpower.

The next section of this story relies on the Zimmerman records Pfarrer Walter discovered in the Lutheran church in Altheim, Hesse.

Hans Zimmerman lived in Altheim in the year 1558. It's not clear if he was our ancestor.

Paulus Zimmerman (d. aft 1648 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse) One story had it that Paulus was a Roman soldier that settled in Altheim. This makes sense because during his lifetime Germany was part of the Holy Roman Empire, and Paulus is the Latin version of the name 'Paul.' We think he was our ancestor but it's not certain. This is what Pfarrer Walter wrote about Paulus:

Due to war, hunger and disease only about 120 of the 360 inhabitants of Altheim remained alive in the Thirty Years War(1618-1648). A Paulus Zimmerman survived the war. (He was) a magistrate (and) ... a weaver. He was buried on April 11, 1666. One of his sons could have been Nikolaus Zimmerman of whom descendants still live at Kirchstraze 23 and 33. A Johann Peter Zimmerman about 1648 was most probably a son of Paulus Zimmerman, because he was also a magistrate in 1682, and later a village mayor.

Johann Peter Zimmerman (1648 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse - 1705 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse)

He died July 20, 1705 at the age of 57. In 1680 he, like other husbandmen (farmers), was assessed a tax of 70 florins, but he was not very able to pay. He owned a poor home, the worth of which amounted to only 30 florins. The worth of his land was 165 florins, and for livestock he had two pair of bad (poor) horses, one cow, one-year-old ox, three pigs. (A good beginning nonetheless, considering the poverty after the war.) In addition 25 florins borrowed from the church building and ten from the parsonage. He had five children. Of the five children of Johann Peter Zimmerman, the three sons Johann Peter, Nickel Matthias, and Andreas left numerous descendants. We are interested in the line of Nickel Matthias Zimmerman, which stretches into the present.

Nickel Matthias Zimmerman (1677 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse – 1731 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse ) married Anna Maria Funck (b. about 1690).

Nickel Matthias Zimmerman was born October 16, 1677 and died April 13, 1731. He had seven children. Of the two sons, Johann Jost Zimmerman continues the line.

Johann Jost Zimmerman (1713 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse – 1792 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse) married Anna Catharina Willman (b. 1718 Strakenberg, Hesse).

Johann Jost Zimmerman...had four children. Of his-two sons, Johann Bernhard continues the line.

Johann Bernhard Zimmerman (1743 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse – 1820 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse) married Anna Sybilla Appel (1749 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse – 1782 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse) on September 17,1772 in Hauptstraze 35, the house of her father. Johann Bernhard and Anna Sybilla had seven children in the following ten years. Anna died in childbirth with the seventh child who was born dead. Johann Bernhard married four more times in 1783, 1793, 1799 and 1802. I don't know how many more children he had.

Anna Sybilla was the daughter of Johann Valentin Appel (1716 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse – 1772 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse) and Anna Christina Marie Ohl (1710 Hergerschausen, Hesse – 1790 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse). When one of our cousins, Phillip Rolvang Nelson, visited Altheim in 1934 he found that Appel was one of the most common names in the village judging from the graveyard.

On the Roll of Property and Proprietors, the farm of Bernhard Zimmerman in Altheim/Hessen, Haupstrasse 35, in the year 1792, has one dwelling house with two stories, a stable, a barn and a pigsty.

One of Johann Bernhard and Anna Sybilla's sons was:

Johann Peter Zimmerman (1773 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse – 1852 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse) married Anna Catherina Sauerwein (1778 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse – 1853 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse). Johann Peter Zimmerman had only a small rural property which consisted of a two-story house, barn, cow-barn, pig pen, ten and one-half morgen field, two morgen meadows; worth of property was 960 florins. A florin was originally a gold Italian coin later adopted by much of Europe. According to Wikipedia, a “morgen" was traditionally about 60-70% of what a man could cover in a full day of ploughing. Of Peter Zimmerman's ten children we know a little of four of them and a lot about one of them. Here are the four:

Anna Maria Zimmerman (1804 – 1806) died as a toddler in the stream behind her family's house.

Johann Peter Zimmerman (1807 – 1810) died in the stream behind his family's house. Yes, that's right! Two children from this family died by drowning in their own backyard at two separate times.

Johann Valentin Zimmerman (1810 – 1837) stayed in the family home and passed it on to his heirs.

Johann Heinrich Zimmerman (b. 1815 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse), called Henry, came to America after his brother Johann Christian. Here is what Christian's granddaughter Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson said about this Henry:

(Christian's) brother Henry came in 1837. When Henry came, he took a farm about fifty miles farther up the railroad from Christian. He...received a farm with 100 acres of land from the English government near Sebringsville in Ontario. We...know that he frequently came down to visit my grandfather, and after my grandfather's death, sometimes visited the family. My father remembers seeing him when he was down on one of those visits, but as my father was only about five years old his recollections of what he said and did are not very vivid. My grandfather's brother Henry (1815) was a cabinetmaker by trade and during the long winters made such furniture as he could use or sell. He made a very wonderful bureau with secret drawers for keeping his money. Banks were not much used in those days, and hiding places for money were always in demand. In some way this piece of furniture came into the possession of my father's brother, Henry (1835). My father's brother, Henry (1835), also had a table made by (Henry 1815). It was a wonderful piece of work, and took the prize at a provincial fair or show, where Uncle Henry (1835) became very much interested in it, and bought it
after the show was over. Uncle Henry's (1835) daughter, Lydia, remembers this furniture well.

My grandfather's brother Henry (1815) had a family. There was a boy, Dan, who was a very fine penman which was quite an accomplishment in those days. We also know there were several daughters in the family.

Annie Marie believed Henry (1815) eventually returned to Germany and died there.

The child of Johann Peter and Anna Catharina Sauerwein Zimmerman that we are most interested in is
Johann Christian Zimmerman (1800 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse – 1851 Sebringsville, Ontario, Canada), called Christian, and also his wife, Elizabeth Dorthea Knoll (1809 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse – 1888 Fillmore Co., Minnesota). They are our immigrant Zimmerman and Knoll ancestors.

Here follows the story of Christian Zimmerman as told by his granddaughter, Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson.

During the year 1832, there came into the affairs of Christian Zimmerman a simple little circumstance which changed the course of his whole life.

One Sunday afternoon, Christian and his younger brother, Henry, were sitting on a fence not far from their home, when a group of young men about their own age joined them. These young men were discussing the fact that the English Sovereign was giving away one hundred acres of land in Canada to anyone who would go there and live on it. This looked like a wonderful opportunity to these boys who worked for a few cents a day, or perhaps received only thirty dollars for a whole years work, out of which they had to furnish their own clothes, which were made by hand. It was not an unusual thing during the busy season for these boys to rise at three o'clock in the morning and thresh grain with a flail until late at night. So the Sovereign's offer of one hundred acres of land brought forth quite a discussion. Some contended that here there really might be a great opportunity. Others thought that the hardships to be endured were too great. The long and perilous journey to the new world was in itself considered dangerous, and if the trip were made successfully, the hardships to be endured after arrival were almost insurmountable. Were there not great risks from sickness and hunger; from wild beasts and uncivilized people? So the discussion went on. The majority thought that they would like to avail themselves of this opportunity, if it were closer at hand; but that under the circumstances, the adventure to secure it was attended with too much sacrifice and danger. Christian was very much interested in this offer of the English Government, and finally decided that it was an opportunity which he must seize, and he made up his mind that he would go to Canada and have one of those farms. He realized that in Germany the opportunities of ever having a home of his own were not very good. Many of his friends tried to discourage him by telling him that rattle snakes and bears would kill him, and that he would never make the journey safely. The ocean voyage had to be made in sail ships at that time, and it took from six to fourteen weeks to come across the ocean. Christian could not be discouraged or turned from his purpose, and in due time made the journey.

Christian Zimmerman was born in 1800, so he was thirty-two years of age when he came to Canada and settled at Sebringsville, Ontario, Canada. His brother, Henry, came in 1837. Christian had his hundred acre farm.

The hundred acre plots were laid out in long narrow strips so that each farm would touch the highway. Christian's plot was one-fourth mile east of the present village of Sebringsville, on the south side of the road. The Buffalo and Lake Erie Railroad ran across the farm in later years. The old log house stood about ten rods away from the highway.

On the boat with Christian was Elizabeth Dorthea Knoll who had lived two houses down from him in Altheim. It is not known whether they planned to leave together or it just happened. Were they sweethearts leaving together on a great adventure? Or did they just happen to leave together and become better acquainted on the boat? We don't know for sure, but I have a feeling it was the former, since they were close neighbors. Annie Marie continues:

Elizabeth and Christian complied with the custom of those days which was that a wedding must be announced for three successive Sundays in the church before the young people could be married. They were devoted to each other, and their wedded life was exceedingly happy. Elizabeth was a great help to her husband, not only in making a happy home for him, but also in clearing the timber from the land. She helped him pile and burn brush, and sometimes get the logs off the land. She did whatever else there was to do that a woman could do. She was always well, happy and busy, being of the industrious type of woman. She was of medium size and weight, with slightly rounded shoulders. In her later years, she became decidedly round-shouldered. Her eyes were very dark blue, and her hair a very dark brown, almost black. Her hair never turned gray, even in her last days.

Christian had brown eyes, dark hair, and very pretty rosy cheeks with a nice clear complexion, better than many women have. He was not skinny, but was a slender man of medium height and weight.

They were both devoted Christians, and had a simple, beautiful faith in God, similar to that of other Christian people of their time. One Sunday during a heavy storm, the wind was beating the rain into the barn where the freshly threshed grain was lying. Elizabeth, after watching the storm for awhile, suggested that they had better go out and try to keep the grain dry, but Christian thought that they ought not to break God's Sabbath by doing manual labor, and suggested that God knew that they needed the grain, and if He wished them to have it, He would save the crop without their breaking His Holy Sabbath Day.

In Germany they were Lutherans, but in Canada they joined the German Evangelical Church, and in this church they trained their children in Christian living and in the doctrines of religion. All their children joined the church and led Christian lives, probably much above average.

Christian was not a very good sportsman, not having had an opportunity for such things in his youth. In Europe, this privilege was reserved for the wealthy landlords. But in Canada there was an abundance of deer for all, and other wild game was very plentiful. He seldom shot anything, even if the deer fed on his garden. One day a big deer came into the yard, and with an old, rusty gun, Christian shot it. But the gun gave him such a kick, and he felt so badly as he saw the beautiful animal lying dead before him, that he never tried shooting again.

Elizabeth and Christian built a log cabin on their place. It had two windows, and on one side an addition which they used for a summer cookhouse. This was their happy home. In the winter they would clear the land of brush and timber, and in the summer they would raise their crops. After the grain was hauled into the barn and threshed, Christian would spend an hour or two daily during the Fall throwing grain to remove the chaff. (A method of winnowing - involves throwing the mixture into the air so that the wind blows away the lighter chaff, while the heavier grains fall back down for recovery)

Some years later they sold two acres of their farm, one acre for the erection of a blacksmith shop, and the other to build a tailor shop on. Then a school house was built across from the little log house and a short distance down the road. The little village of Sebringsville grew up about a quarter of a mile from the school house.

Elizabeth and Christian had a family of five boys and two girls... Phillip was the youngest of the family. He was born January 10, 1851. That spring when the plum trees were in bloom, which must have been in May or June, his father died. Christian was only about 48 years old. For almost a week he had been busy building a dam which had necessitated his standing in cold water and mud most of the time while he was at his work. This brought about his death. He was sick only three or four days. He was buried in the Sebringsville Cemetery with a wooden tombstone on the grave, but now the exact spot of the grave is not known. Around 1890, the old cemetery, which was back of the Sebringsville church, was moved to higher ground because the graves filled with water. Such graves as had no one interested in them were abandoned. There were no relatives of Christian living there when this was done, so those who might have been interested did not even learn of the change until long after it had been made. So the body was never moved, but lies somewhere in the old cemetery which has been abandoned. Who knows, but it may also be petrified. It is an interesting fact that of the bodies moved, three or four were found to be perfectly petrified, which often happens when bodies are buried in low ground. At the time of Christian's death, the older boys were fourteen and thirteen, and Phillip was only five or six months old. Very sad and lonely hours followed the break-up of the once so happy home.

Christian and Elizabeth had seven children and at least 55 grandchildren. Of those 55, thirteen did not live to adulthood. Of the 42 that did, twelve never married. Of the thirty that did marry five didn't have children. Out of 55 grandchildren, 25 reproduced.

There is more about Elizabeth Dorthea Knoll Zimmerman in her own story. For now, we will consider the lives of Christian and Elizabeth's seven children:

The first child of Christian and Elizabeth Zimmerman was Johann Heinrich Zimmerman, called Henry, (1835 Canada – 1909 USA), the oldest. He married Mary Krusp in Canada in 1856. Mary's family had also come from Germany and settled first near the Zimmermans in Canada and later near the Zimmermans in Minnesota.

After Christian died the family ran the farm together for awhile. Then the church decided the farm should be Henry's property. He did not do well. Cousin Rolland tells us:

Henry started farming but lost the farm. He then went into the bee business, having as high as 400 swarms. He made good from the sale of honey for a long time. Canadian custom (adopted from England) expected oldest son to care for parents. When he lost his property his mother, Elizabeth, went to stay with other children at Preston, Minnesota.

Annie Marie adds:

Whatever property (Elizabeth) may have had was lost in some way through Henry's mismanagement...

Henry and Mary had a family of eight children; six boys, two girls. All married. One, Will, married the same woman twice! Three never had children, but the other five had a total of 11 children. All settled in Washington or California except Albert, the youngest. He moved to Australia and became very wealthy in the import-export business until he lost it all in the run-up to WWII.

There is some question of where Henry died. His great-grand-nephew Gordon Zimmerman says he has seen this Henry's grave at Canby Oregon. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson says this Henry Zimmerman is buried in New Mexico where he died while he was staying with a daughter. Another descendant, Katie Allen, says this Henry died in Watsonville, California, the same as his wife.


The second child of Christian and Elizabeth Zimmerman was Adam Zimmerman, our ancestor. More about him in a bit.

The third child of Christian and Elizabeth Zimmerman was Katherine Zimmerman (1839 Canada – 1877 Martin Co., Minnesota) Katherine came to Fillmore County, Minnesota from Canada with her brother Adam in 1859. Katherine and her brother Adam married a brother and sister of the family of George and Margaretha Strub Hopp, immigrants from Alsace, France. It was a double wedding ceremony. Katherine married George Hopp Jr. Adam married Eve Hopp. George Hopp Jr. was a farmer. He and Katherine had ten children during the next eighteen years, six boys and four girls. Katherine died in childbirth with the tenth baby. Then George married again and had six more children, making sixteen altogether. Of the ten with Katherine, the first two died before the age of two (1st John and Michael). The second and third were twins (Michael and 2nd John). Three never married (John, Matilda and Katherine). Two married but never had children (Jacob and Emma). One (Henry) we have no record of except his birth and death. Two girls were nurses, one girl was a teacher. Only two of the ten had children of their own; Lydia married Charles Oxreider and had three children; George, a successful lawyer in Minneapolis, had two children. So out of ten children Katherine only had five grandchildren. This is what Cousin Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson wrote about George Hopp III. :

"I knew Cousin George Hopp the best (of the children of Katherine and George Hopp). He was a very dear cousin and attended the University of Minnesota while I was attending Hamline University, and I saw him a great deal.
He became an exceptionally successful lawyer and banker and traveled abroad a great deal in connection
with his business.

Second John worked as a gold miner. The 1920 Census says he is the Manager of a Gold Mine. The 1930 Census show him living in Seattle with two single sisters, Matilda and Katherine, and still working in the Gold Mine. In Seattle! Except for George, who stayed in Minnesota, all these children ended up in the state of Washington.
The fourth child of Christian and Elizabeth Zimmerman was Peter Zimmerman (1842 Canada – 1894 Racine, Minnesota) who married Catherine Riehl (1844 Canada – 1902 Racine, Minnesota). It appears the Rhiel family was another family that migrated from Canada to Minnesota. This is what Cousin Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson wrote about Peter:

Peter Zimmerman and his brother Christ, came to Minnesota after the Civil War ended in 1865. They worked in a shingle mill all summer in Stillwater, Minnesota. Each earned about $14.00 a week, and Peter saved about $1,000. The next spring, they went to Stillwater again, but the river was too high to work at the shingle mill, so the brothers came to Preston and found work there. Because he was afraid he would be robbed, Peter pretended to be poor, and worked his way down the Mississippi on a boat, and left the river at Winona...Christ decided to go west and pan for gold in Montana...Peter stayed in Minnesota where he bought 160 acres of land in Racine township of Mower County. It was the last section to be cleared, and he paid twice as much for it as others had paid for the land around it. At the same time, he could have bought land where St. Paul now stands for less than half of what he paid for the land he chose. He built a three-room house with a kitchen, bedroom and a pantry. Later, when he was courting Catherine Rhiel, he walked twenty-five miles to Preston to see her. Another time he borrowed a buggy from old
man Felch to make the trip. Catherine had come from Canada when she was twenty-one, and stayed with her half-sister, Mary Long.
Peter and Catherine were married January 14, 1868, and lived in the frame house near Racine. The first winter, Catherine was so homesick that she rode to Preston in a bobsled, sitting on a box. She stayed a week and then was ready to come home.

Peter was a serious, quiet man with dark hair, a sandy mustache, and intense deep gray eyes. He was very proficient in reading and writing the German language, but sometimes had difficulty with English. He wanted his family to use the German language at home, but Catherine thought that this would be wrong, as they were Americans now.

Peter and Catherine's first child was Anna Barbara Zimmerman (1869 Minnesota – 1949 Los Angles, California). Anna Barbara married Sam Anstett. They got divorced after having three daughters, Pearl, Stella and Bessie. Anna lived with her widowed daughter Pearl in later years. One of Anna Barbara's grandsons, son of Bessie Anstett, was named Nardeth Pooley. He was a lieutenant colonel in the army, fought in WWII and Korea and is buried at Arlington Cemetery.

Peter and Catherine's second child was George Zimmerman (1871 Minnesota – 1882 Minnesota) who died at the age of eleven.

Peter and Catherine's third child, Margaret Lydia Zimmerman (1873 Minnesota – 1935 California) married Julius Krause. The Krauses are related to our Zimmerman's in another way too, which I'll explain later. Julius was an extremely successful farmer. There was some kind of feud that developed between Julius and Margaret's brother John Zimmerman, after which, Julius wouldn't have anything to do with the rest of the Zimmermans except Margaret's sister Ida and later on, some nieces. Immediately after telling about the feud, Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson wrote the following:

The only one of my grandfather Krause?s family now living is my mother?s brother, Julius Krause, who lives in Santa Ana, California. My grandfather Krause?s father and grandfather were very good-nature d and of a most lovable disposition, but grandfather's father married a redheaded woman who was very nervous and excitable and could get very angry. She was ... a Schiller, a close relative of the poet and writer. Godleib, the oldest boy, was like his father and would almost never get angry or out of patience with anyone or anything. The second child, my grandfather, inherited the disposition of his mother and that brought into the family a nervous and irritable strain which partly overshadows the quiet lovely character of my great-grandfather.... in his children and grand-children the temperament of this woman is very conspicuous.

The Krauses are just in-laws to us, but she wrote this right after mentioning Julius which made me think perhaps he had an irritable disposition. I thought it was amusing she brought the grandmother's red hair into it.

Peter and Catherine’s fourth child was John William Zimmerman (1876 Minnesota – 1956 Minnesota). He married Zora Haas. Peter died of cancer while his children were still quite young, his only remaining son, John, just eighteen, took over the running of the farm. Annie Marie writes:

After Peter's death Catherine and her only son, John, who was in his teens at the time of his father's death, carried on the work of the farm for a while. Then he (John) married Zora Haas, and took over the farm with its beautiful home. Catherine died in 1902. Now at the time of this writing (1952) the son, John Zimmerman, is an elderly man. His wife has been dead for some time. He has sold the old home and lives in Rochester, Minnesota. His daughter Ruth, who is an instructor in art in Rochester, and lives with him.

Ruth was a twin to Rolland, John and Zora's son who went to Altheim and found the Pfarrer

who discovered all the old Zimmerman records. John and Zora's other two children were Vernon and Lloyd.

Peter and Catherine’s fifth child was Matilda Marie Zimmerman (1879 Minnesota – 1965 Montana). She married Will Huhnerkoch and they farmed in Montana. They had one child whom they adopted, Lillian.

Peter and Catherine’s sixth child Ida Catherine Zimmerman (b. 1885 Minnesota) married Leroy Drummond, a teamster, and had three boys. I have recently been in touch with one of Ida Catherine's descendants who has a marvelous family tree on Ancestry.com.

The fifth child of Christian and Elizabeth Zimmerman was Christian Zimmerman (1848 Sebringville, Ontario, Canada – 1934 Yamhill, OR) who married Louisa Sophia Nolte (1857 Sebringville, Ontario, Canada – 1938 Yamhill, OR). This Christian was called Christ for short, and sometimes Cris. In case you're getting confused, this Christian is a son of our immigrant ancestor, Johann Christian Zimmerman (b.1800), and also called "Christian." The following story was written by Christian's son George: Biography of Christian Zimmerman, brother of Peter Zimmerman, by George S. Zimmerman written at age 90, 1974, 1975:

This story begins in spring of 1868, when father was 20 years old. He had been working in Minneapolis, Minnesota in flour mill and woolen mill during winter 1867-1868. He wanted to go west so traveled down Mississippi River to mouth of Missouri River. Voyage was by boat. As money was scarce with him, he took job on river boat going up Missouri River to Fort Benton Montana. One of his jobs was to load wood into boats boilers.

As they neared Fort Benton at a wood loading dock, he saw where a white man delivering wood on steamboat dock, was murdered and scalped. His clothes were stolen from his body and he was left laying by the wood dock.

At Fort Benton he took a job driving a team of mules hauling freight to Helena, Montana. This was the winter of 1868-69. This was a bitter cold job and he suffered greatly.

In the spring of 1869 or 1870 he quit the teamster job at Helena. He met a man by the name of Thomas Cruse. They took up a mining claim together and started working it at Nelson Creek.

This was a very lawless country. Father never carried a gun in his entire life. They worked this claim together. At night thieves would come and rob sluice boxes. There was lots of gun play around. Father was used to this rough life. But one morning he had had enough. He rolled up his blankets and started West. He left everything to his partner, Thomas Cruse. He never went back or remained in contact with Mr. Cruse.

After six months or a year, he learned that Thomas Cruse had struck it rich. He had quit the country for good and never regretted it. Lawlessness was everywhere. Would he be the next one to be scalped, or murdered by white men if he tried to protect his property at night. Before he left, he never signed any release papers with Thomas Cruse for his half of original claim.

He traveled westward, working his way as opportunity afforded. He landed in Palouse country of South East Washington at harvest time. After Harvest, he worked his way down the Columbia River basin to Portland, Oregon. Just how long it took him, we have no record. How long he stayed in Portland and later the Mt. St. Helens area, we have no record.

It was a rainy, cold winter and he took down with chills and fever. In Portland he met a man who advised him to go to Puget Sound country around Tacoma or Seattle. The chills and fever left him in this salt water country.


The first winter he and his partner fished for salmon and packed them in salt for boats that came into Seattle Harbor. How long he worked at this, I do not know.

The next record we have, he and another partner went up into Canada's Peace River Country and took up a mining claim. Just how well he fared there is not known. When I (George Zimmerman) was quite a small boy, I remember we had a teacup 1/3 full of gold nuggets from this undertaking.

He then returned to Puget Sound and secured work in a logging camp on Whidby Island getting out logs for California bound log rafts. The company for which he was working went bankrupt and for his accumulated wages he took title to 40 acres of timber believed to have been on Vashon Island. He worked long enough in the timber industry to learn business. Logging was done by ox team. He went out and purchased 3 or 4 yoke of oxen and was
in the logging business.

We have his old time book which indicates he began logging June 12th 1877. We also have his old legal records that show he purchased a lot at Third and Bell Streets in Seattle and kept it until he had moved to Yamhill, Oregon during 1887. This land is now part of the Seattle Center Worlds Fair Complex.

The 1880 U.S. Census show Zimmerman Logging Company with 12 people working. It shows fathers age as 31. The census also shows a Chinese Cook and Oilers. (It also shows his nephew, John Hopp, working for him.)

He left to go up Missouri River in 1868 and (was) logging in 1877. These 9 years are very sketchy, and few positive dates can be set.

In 1910 he sold the family farm 2 miles North of Yamhill Oregon to me. He then built a new house on a hill just to the North of this farm, that he had purchased in 1887 from the John J. Burton Estate, the original homesteading family of this land.

In 1929 a man stopped at Zimmerman Bros. Elevator on Railroad East of Yamhill where my brother, Edward Zimmerman was working. He said his name was William A. Jackson and be had lived in Helena, Montana. He wanted to know if the Zimmermans here had been in Helena, Montana in the very early days. He said in 1914 there was a suit to clear title of land held by Thomas Cruse in Partnership with Christian Zimmerman who could not be located, and was presumed dead.

My brother Ed took the man home and fed him, for Mr. Jackson was down on his luck. Ed then asked his father if he had ever been in Partnership with Thomas Cruse in Helena, Montana. Yes he had been a partner and the strike that made Thomas Cruse a Multimillionaire was made after Father had left.

Christian Zimmerman had never told his four sons of his life in Montana until this time in 1929. He had never contacted Thomas Cruse. He never realized that for years he still owned a share in a very large mining
operation near Helena, Montana.

My Father, Christian Zimmerman died August, 1934 at Yamhill Oregon.

After Christian finished with his adventures in Canada , Washington and Montana he went back to the old home country in Sebringville, Ontario, Canada and married Louisa Sophia Nolte (1857 Canada – 1938 Oregon). Sophia was his childhood sweetheart. She had waited a long time for him. Christian and Sophia traveled west to Oregon on one of the immigrant trains on which the Wintermantels had traveled to Oregon. Perhaps the very same one! They settled in Yamhill, Oregon and had a prune orchard. Before he died in 1934 Christian had acquired several thousand acres of land in the Yamhill area. Christian was a civic minded community member and a great supporter of education. He had a school named for him and either he or one of his sons served on area school boards continuously from 1892 to 1960. Christian and Sophia had a family of three girls and four boys. They had bad luck with their girls. The first girl, Catherine, lived almost six months. The other two were twins, Mary and

Emma, born in 1889. Mary lived almost three weeks; Emma, less than four. However, the boys all grew to be very successful adults and pillars of their communities.

Christian and Louisa's first son was Benjamin Franklin Zimmerman (1883 Can – 1947 Seattle) Frank as he was called made his home in Seattle where he worked in the hotel business. He and his wife raised three children. In later years they retired on Vashon Island.
Annie Marie writes:

Frank was noted for his kindly and lovable disposition and left many very devoted friends.

Christian and Louisa's second son, George Samuel Zimmerman (1885 Oregon – 1976 Oregon), bought the family farm from his father. He developed a grain elevator business. He was very active in his community of Yamhill, Oregon, serving as a county commissioner, and working on the development of roads as the country moved from horse to automobile traffic. He and his wife, Oka Swingle, had two daughters and a son. Another son died in infancy. The son that lived, Gordon Zimmerman, is an operatic tenor and sang professionally for many years in the San Francisco area until he suffered from Bells Palsey and asthma. He has made many recordings and we have one of them. He has been a lifelong railroad enthusiast. He is the author of the book A Song of Yamhill and furnished material for this Zimmerman History. George and Oka's daughter, Linola, also had a beautiful voice and sang in Opera. Her career was cut short by a mental illness. George and Oka's fourth child, daughter Celia, was very active in genealogy. She married Emmitt Dromgoole.

Christian and Louisa's third son was Peter Christian Zimmerman ( 1886 Oregon – 1950 Oregon) This is what Annie wrote about Peter:

Peter was the third child in this family. He married Ethel Patey and they had one daughter whom
they named Carolyn. She married Ben Larson. I am told that Peter was a very wonderful and good man;
not only was he an electrical engineer and a good business man, but he became an important man
politically in the state of Oregon. He was a liberal and stood for government control of electrical power
so that electricity would be available to every farmer and poor person in the state of Oregon. In 1934 he
was prevailed upon to run for Governor and received a very heavy vote, but not quite enough to win the
election. He was a Republican, and (that) year the Democratic Party elected their man because there was a
split in the Republican Party. Peter was a great orator and debater and fearless in presenting the truth as he saw it.

Christian and Louisa's fourth son was Edward Orin Zimmerman (1890 Oregon – 1985 California) Edward served in the Navy in WWII. Annie wrote the following about Edward:

Edward is the youngest of Uncle Christ's children. He married Cecil Deach and they have a
family of five children...The boys are Orin, Clifton and Martin. The girls are Elnor, who
married David Harlow; and Janette, who married Robert De Shazer... (Edward) has a large poultry farm near Yamhill, Oregon. Each year he raises about ten thousand fryers and four thousand turkeys and also has a large herd of cattle. He works for George (his brother with the Grain Elevator business) most of the time as George's business requires a few skilled and dependable mechanics and Edward is an electrical engineer and good workman.



The sixth child of Christian and Elizabeth Zimmerman was Elizabeth Zimmerman (abt 1849 Canada- abt 1870), called Betsie. Betsie married Christ Regal and died in childbirth with her first baby. That's all I know about her. Both of Christian and Elizabeth's daughters died in childbirth.

The seventh and last child of Christian and Elizabeth Zimmerman was Phillip Zimmerman (1851 Sebringville, Ontario, Canada – 1941 Spring Valley, Fillmore, Minnesota). We know a lot about Phillip and his family because he was Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson's father!

Here is the Phillip Zimmerman Obituary:

Phillip Zimmerman, the youngest of seven children, was born in Ontario, Canada, January 10, 1851. His father, Christian Zimmerman, died when Phillip was five months old. At the age of 14 it was necessary for the boy to earn his own living, and he found employment on the farm of a kindly Scotchman, Robert Murray, at ten dollars a month. An older brother had earlier left for Minnesota and Phillip followed him. Phillip's first job was working for Dr. Von Lochen of Preston driving the doctor's team and caring for them. The following winter, at the age of sixteen, he joined a crew of lumberjacks in the pine woods along the Mississippi.
In 1874 he married Ernestine Krause of Racine. They made their home near Fairmont, Minnesota. For two successive years a plague of grasshoppers destroyed their entire crop, so they abandoned their farm and returned to Spring Valley.
They settled on what is known as the Zimmerman Homestead, the farm 3½ miles northwest of Spring Valley, where Mr. and Mrs. Jack Briggs have been living. Phillip placed his building on a hill above Deer Creek, close to a large spring which served for years as a refrigerator. As the children grew old enough to help with the work, more land was acquired until the original 160 became 360 acres. For the Zimmerman's and their seven children this was the good life known by the early settlers of our community. They "broke" (cleared) the land, planted crops, raised chickens and stock. They slept on cornhusk mattresses in summer and feather beds in winter. They canned from two to four hundred quarts of fruit yearly and made twenty gallons of sauerkraut. They boarded the crew of "Irish paddies" who laid the track for the Great Western railroad across their farm and built the high trestle. There were picnics in the "Jensen woods" and on the winter evenings, visiting back and forth with their good neighbors, the Thayers, the Hesses, and the Churchills. In winters with the sleigh, in summer with the "surrey with the fringe on top," they drove every Sunday to the first Methodist Church of Spring Valley.
In 1924, friends and neighbors celebrated the golden wedding anniversary of the Zimmerman's. Mrs. Zimmerman passed away in 1926, but Mr. Zimmerman reached the age of 90, passing away in 1941. Of the seven children three are living, Annie, Alice, and Fern. In 1905 Annie, the oldest child married a Methodist minister Fred Nelson. They are now retired and live in Los Altos, California. In 1899, Julius left for western Montana and worked with the sheep-herders and cattlemen, an era of the early west known today as "cowboy days." In 1906, Albert married Anna Thompson and farmed in the Buckwheat Ridge community, retiring to Spring Valley in 1946. Edward married Tressie Tabor in 1913 and took over the old home farm, for his father retired that year and moved to the northeast part of Spring Valley. Minnie first taught high school, then did graduate work and became the librarian at Winona State Teachers College. Alice and Fern taught for twenty years in Cloquet High School, Minnesota. They now make their home with a 92-year old uncle, Julius Krause, in Santa Ana, California.

Another story in Annie Marie's book tells about Phillip's schooling while in Canada and punishment:

For more than twenty years that school (in Canada) was conducted by a Mr. Hamilton. He was a school master of the old type, who did not believe in spoiling the child by sparing the rod. In the home too, children were punished most severely in those days, sometimes at very slight provocations. I have heard my father tell of how a lamp chimney was broken in some way. It was thought that he could have prevented it if he had been watching the children more cautiously, so he had to be whipped. Thirty-nine strokes was the punishment. Nowadays we would consider such treatment beyond all reason, and some people think that one should not punish a child at all. A generation or two makes a great change in people?s thinking. …



Another of Annie's stories tells about Phillip's first job:

(The) Scotchman paid him the salary in silver dollars. My father carried those sixty silver dollars home six miles to Uncle Henry, who then gave him seventy five cents out of it for spending money. This was the first spending money that my father had ever had and it is interesting to note how he spent it. First he says he bought a comb for himself thinking how fine it would be to have one all his very own. Then as most boys would have done he bought a jackknife, and with what money there was left he bought candy to treat his brothers. He was badly in need of a suit of clothes at this time so that he could go to church and Sunday school, but that seems to have been out of the question. My Uncle Adam, who was next younger than Henry, and who was now living in the United States at Preston, Minnesota, made a visit to Canada about this time; and when he returned he took my father with him.

Phillip married Ernestine Krause (1853 Prussia – 1941 Spring Valley, Fillmore Co., Minnesota) I want to tell you a little about the Krause family. The Krause farm adjoined the farm of Phillip's brother, Peter Zimmerman. Peter's daughter married Julius Krause, brother to Ernestine Krause. Aside of their streak of irritability and the red-headed grandmother, Annie Marie describes the Krause family this way:

My grandfather Krauses family was musical, but as they did not have musical instruments in those early days they expressed their musical talent in song. They sang at their work and at their play. You could never be at their home for any length of time without hearing their song. It was as natural for them to sing as it was to eat. It was a part of their nature and their life. When the youngest child was about thirteen years old, grandfather bought an organ and she learned to play, and then they had many a family sing, with the organ. But I love to think of their song as I used to hear it in my childhood days when they were working in the fields or as they were preparing meals or making beds, or most frequently in the open as they did their work about the house and barn. I shall never forget their clear beautiful voices.

The Krause family is another of the group of families that appears to have migrated from near Sebringsville, Canada to Fillmore County, Minnesota, along with Zimmermans, Riehls, and Krusps.

The Wilder Family Farm was also in Spring Valley, Minnesota. From May 1890 to October 1891 Laura and Almanzo lived with Almanzo's parents there and attended the Methodist church. So Phillip's family undoubtedly knew Laura Ingalls Wilder and the Wilder family.

Phillip and Ernestine's first child was Anna Marie Zimmerman (1874 Minnesota – 1964 Michigan). She married Reverend Alfred Christian Nelson, called Fred, a Methodist minister. Allan Van Lehn, Annie's grandson, wrote the following in his forward to his grandmother's book, Zimmerman Family History and Stories:

Grandma could speak German and taught us a few words. I remember her playing some 78 rpm
records of German songs, especially Christmas carols. She didn't push a lot of German culture on us, I
think, because of Hitler and the Third Reich. That was a sad and embarrassing period in human history
especially to my grandparents who worked so hard to help people and spread the Gospel (good news of
God's love). ..
Grandma was quite a prize because she was well educated, was a school teacher at 16 and school
principal at age 27, was quite spiritual and religious, had a strong work ethic, was very accomplished in
the domestic arts by virtue of being the oldest child, having to help her mother care for and raise her
younger siblings. It has always been astounding that there was a 25 year age difference between grandma
and the youngest child, my mother's aunt Fern. Grandma helped grandpa in the church by organizing and
running the ladies aid society, running the Sunday school, and even giving the sermon when grandpa was
sick or away. Very few ministers' wives (unless pastors themselves) had the training or inclination to do
what grandma did. One of grandma's favorite causes was the appreciation of God's creation: the mineral

and vegetable, but especially the animal kingdom. She talked eloquently about the importance of being
kind to animals. She was very fond of guinea pigs.

The book is filled with humorous, sad, glad and heart-warming stories of her family with Fred, her birth family and her extended Zimmerman and Krause families. Annie Marie and her husband were both ministers and had some hair-raising adventures traveling to their various churches in Montana in the early 1900's. This one I just have to relate here:

Chapter 4, p. 14 - FORDING the GULCH
Soon after our arrival in Shelby arrangements were made for Fred to preach one Sunday at Chester and
Lothair, and the next Sunday at Shelby. The Sunday that he was gone to Chester, I would take my baby
on one arm and an ax and kindling in the other and go over to the church, sometimes through deep
snowdrifts, to build a fire and then wait for Sunday school children to arrive. After Sunday school was
over I would have to conduct the morning service. The surprising thing about that work was that there
were usually about twenty men and only three or four women. The next Sunday Fred would keep the
baby and do as I had done while I would go to preach in Chester and Lothair, and in this way we
alternated the work all winter. In the spring the district superintendent wanted us to preach at Sweet
Grass which was on the Canadian border 40 miles to the north, as a young student had filed on a claim
near Chester, and could look after that work. Railroad connections were not very good to go to Sweet
Grass so that brought on a problem.
Shelby was anxious for us to stay in their town and built a parsonage for us, but the problem of
living on the claim had to be solved. We were supposed to live on our claim about six months out of
every year for three years. There seemed to be no solution. Finally we borrowed money from Fred's
father and bought a Ford [model T]. We established a residence on our claim and drove about 150 miles
every week-end, holding a church service at Sweet Grass every Sunday morning, at Shelby every Sunday
evening, besides preaching at a school house or two on the way. When we held service at the Sweet
Grass Hills School House, all the dinner that Fred would have time to eat on Sunday would be a sandwich
as he drove. There was no time to stop to eat. This life was terribly wearing on Fred, but we did not
realize it at the time. Of course, we encountered all kinds of difficulties and storms on these trips. On one
trip to Chester our car stalled in the middle of a big pool of water which recent rain had formed and
which it was impossible to avoid as the railroad track was on one side and a high barbed-wire fence on
the other. Fred had to take off his shoes and wade out and try to get a team of horses from the nearest
farm house to pull us out. While he was gone a Great Northern passenger train passed and when the
engineer and fireman saw us sitting in our car in the pool they reached out their hands to us in a most
imploring manner. The situation must have looked ludicrous to them but not so to us. On another
occasion high water had removed a bridge which crossed a deep gulch over which we had to pass. There
were several narrow thick boards lying near by. Fred laid these across the gulch as far apart as the wheels
of the car and drove across while I stood in front of the car to tell him that he was staying on the boards.
We both held our breath, but got safely over. It was two o'clock in the morning. We did not reach our
destination that night until nearly day-light.

Annie Marie and Fred had two children, Phillip and Joy. Joy is the mother of Allan Van Lehn that I have quoted. Phillip was a concert pianist and played in Nazi, Germany before WWII. He wrote a letter home at that time. I share it with you here:

Darmstadt (Letter arrived in Oakland, California on August 30, 1934)
Bahnhof-hotel
Dear Folks,
I sent you a card from Heidelberg this afternoon and Lucerne before. I got on a train for Darmstadt at 3:10 P.M. or so and arrived after four. This letter is to tell you about Althein while it is fresh in my mind. As I had no map showing it and have forgotten much of what you told me once, I didn't know how best to proceed. So I went to an "eis" stand and had an ice cream cone and incidentally said "Wo est Althein?" As they didn't know they talked about it until someone actually took me to the train. It was a small train, all third class, and the conductor showed me a seat (driving out those who were there first.) He was most interested in my case, and told an old woman who was going there about me. And so we arrived in half an hour and I walked from the station to the village with the old woman. Althein is in Hessen not Hesse. The ticket read Althein, Hessen, so that point we wondered about is clear. I asked several times about "Spitzalthein." It is all one and the same town as Althein. The only reasons I could get for the double name are that Spitzalthein is the old and Althein is the modern name and "It was called Spitzalthein because the church was too high.

My visit was rather a sensation. I had about a dozen people crowded around me. A school teacher "Hermann Menges" stayed with me all the time, and he was the only one who could speak any English. I met no Zimmermans. I saw a Zimmerman house and it was one of the best. One of the Zimmermans is a doctor in this city. There seems to have been more than one family of Zimmermans known to the natives. I do not remember the name of the wife of Christian Zimmerman so could not ask about that. There are 800 people. All are peasant class. There are two main streets and some alleys. There are two teachers and 100 students. There is no music in the town (students or teachers.) Some houses are quite nice looking and there are 4 or 5 radios in evidence broadcasting Hitlers election speeches. The town is full of Hitler signs, etc. The streets are made of stones, the houses of brick or stone. There are forests near by. The country is quite flat. The peasants raise vegetables and are poor "because they can't get money for the vegetables." There are three main families. They are Funk, Roth, and Appel. Most of the graves are of these names. One grave is Nikolaus Zimmerman 1817 - 1896. There is Marie Zimmerman b. 1819.

As there are not enough pastors in Germany they have none just now. They could not look in the church register. Only the pastor can. If you wish to know when a certain person was born etc. and have a definite question write to "Pastor of Althein in Hessen." I was in the church. It was built centuries ago, 1400 or 1500 A.D. and was once Catholic. The church has very thick walls and the original windows are very tiny, as it was used as a fort. The large windows are from modern times. One can see at the windows how thick and fort-like the walls are. I have some postal cards. The natives are mostly blue-eyed and have hair of all shades from black to blond. The place is quite clean compared to Italian villages. I was there five hours and had some "abendessen" (evening food), paying for my school teacher friend, total less than 2 marks. We had brea,d butter and all kinds of cold meats and mustard.

They had a battle last year over Hitler and I was shone the grave of a young Hitler follower 20 years old.

I find I can say a few words in German but understand nothing, almost. The Zimmerman family was not at home (or in evidence) and I saw their old and new (1907) house, both nice brick houses but simple. As the church has a record one might prove a connection with these Zimmermans if it were worth while. The church is Luthern of course.

Next day: I am sick today and shall stay in my room for a while. I have not seen anything of Darmstadt. Perhaps I shall start another letter to you now. The American Express in Berlin is 3 Unter den Linden.

Sincerely Yours,
Phillip

The Zimmerman house Phillip mentions (1907) was the ancestral family home of our Zimmermans. The Zimmerman family living there when Phillip visited in 1934 was George Zimmerman, a direct descendent of our Johann Christian Zimmerman's father, Johann Peter Zimmerman, as was Nikolaus Zimmerman who built the new part of the house in 1907.

Joy VanLehn (Phillip's sister) adds the following:

The next day he went on to Berlin where he gave a concert on Nov. 20, 1934. His friends there included American Ambassador William E. Dodd and his family and Louis Lochner, Bureau chief for the Associated Press in Berlin. All the Americans were getting nervous and advised him to get out of the country as soon as he could, so on Dec. 1, 1934 he left Berlin and went to Holland and Belgium on his way to London.

This concert is mentioned in In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson.

Phillip and Ernestine's second child was Julius Benjamin Zimmerman (1876 Minnesota – 1935 Minnesota). Julius never married. As a young man he went west to Montana and worked several years on the range herding sheep and cattle. Eventually he came back to the old home in Minnesota to care for aging parents.

Phillip and Ernestine's third child was Albert Peter Zimmerman (1878 Minnesota – 1951 Minnesota). He married Anna Thompson and had two children; Ernestine who never married, and Phillip who served in the Navy in WWII and spent some time in Iceland.

Annie Marie tells this story about Albert:

My brother, Albert, had a serious accident the fall that [Williams Jennings] Bryan was running for president on the “16 to 1” platform. As the brothers were returning from a political rally the horse ran away and threw the boys out, breaking Albert's leg near the hip, and injured him otherwise so that he never completely recovered. He was in bed for months...

However, Albert did recover enough to farm until he was nearly seventy near Frankford, Minnesota. Annie calls him, “a kind and dear man.”

Phillip and Ernestine's fourth child was David Phillip Zimmerman (1881 Minnesota – 1882 Minnesota). David died as a toddler of Scarlet Fever.

Phillip and Ernestine's fifth child was Edward Walter Zimmerman (1886 Minnesota – 1953).
He married Theresa Tabor. Edward went to Northwestern University for one year but it was too expensive and he was homesick so he came home and took over his father's farm, eventually buying it.

Phillip and Ernestine's sixth child was Minnie Etta Zimmerman (1889 Minnesota – 1955 California).

Minnie first taught high school, then did graduate work and became the librarian at Winona State Teachers College.

Phillip and Ernestine's seventh child was Esther Alice Zimmerman (1891 Minnesota – 1960 California). Alice, as she was called, was also a college graduate, and taught for twenty years in Cloquet High School, Minnesota. Annie Marie relates this story:

Alice had a serious accident while traveling through Yellowstone Park. She happened to be near a hot spring when the crust on which she was standing gave way and she fell into the boiling water burning her legs badly. For some time there seemed to be no hope for her life, but she had the Zimmerman vitality and shocked her doctor by getting well.

Phillip and Ernestine's eighth child was Fern Joy Zimmerman (1899 Minnesota – 1996 California). Fern too was a college graduate, and taught for twenty years in Cloquet High School, Minnesota along with Alice. Annie Marie writes:

Sister Fern had a serious automobile accident from which no one ever expected her to recover, but after months of pain and suffering she too showed her Zimmerman vitality and got well. How she ever managed to get well no one can tell, but she did after weeks of unconsciousness and untold pain.

And she lived a very long life, living to the age of 97. Fern Joy died 196 years after her grandfather Christian was born.

I've mentioned Julius Krause who had a redheaded grandmother and married Peter Zimmerman's daughter, Margaret Lydia. Julius and Margaret Lydia had one child, a daughter
Mable Krause. The 1930 census lists Mable's occupation as “Music Teacher.” But Mable had some kind of problem that made her an invalid. Some time after 1940, Uncle Julius came back to Minnesota and persuaded his three single nieces, Minnie, Alice and Fern, to come and live with him in Santa Ana, California,and care for Mable, so that's what they did., and I believe they cared for Uncle Julius as well.

Here we are at the end of the beginning of our Zimmerman line. Our Zimmermans had made their home in the village of Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse which is now part of Germany. They lived there at least from the Thirty Years War until Christian came across the sea to Canada on the chance of having a better future. His descendants migrated to Minnesota and then, many of them, on to the west coast. They were all of very good disposition and they all had nice hair!

Love, Granny

Elizabeth Dorothea Knoll, Kneil Knell:

Buried: Methodist Cemetery, Preston, MN

Notes:

26 October 2013

Dear Children

Tonight I will tell you about our Knoll ancestors.

We're not really sure how this name was spelled. My dad thought it was Kneil. I've also seen it as Knell. Knoll seems the most popular so I'll go with the majority. This genealogical information is from Pfarrer Walter's History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim:

The first Knoll that we know about was Andread Knoll who (died in Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse 1806.) He married Susanne Marg Strumfels. Andread and Susanne had at least nine children. Seven survived to adulthood. The one that was our ancestor is:

Johann Adam Knoll ( 1778 Klein-Umstasdt, Darmstadt, Hesse, Germany – 1826 Altheim). He married in 1808 Anna Margarethe Schodt ( of Altheim, Hauptstrasse 27) She was the daughter of:

Philipp Schodt (b 1738) and Anna Margarethe. This is what Pfarrer Walter told us about the Schodts (Elizabeth's maternal grandparents):

(They) owned what for Altheim was quite a good piece of property at Hauptstraze 27. … The daughter, Anna Margarethe Schodt, stayed in her parents home and married Johann Adam Knoll from Klein Umstadt. In 1804 the property consisted of a two story house (that still stands today and has an arched gate), a barn and stable, one fourth Morgen (a measure of land six to nine tenths of an acre) garden, thirty four Morgen fields, three and three-fourths Morgen meadows, value of the property 200 florins.

This is the home where our Elizabeth grew up. Johann Adam Knoll and Anna Margarethe Schodt were the parents of our immigrant Knoll ancestor: Elizabeth Dorthea Knoll (1809 Altheim, Darmstadt, Hessen – 1888 Preston, MN) .

Part of Elizabeth's story is here and part of her story is bound up with that of her husband, Johann Christian Zimmerman (b 1800). Most of her story comes from Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson's Zimmerman Family Stories and History. She told Elizabeth's story so well there's not much to add. Elizabeth was Annie's grandmother and what's more, Annie knew her personally! Annie was almost 14 when her grandmother died, and she lived with Annie's family much of the time.

Elizabeth's father had died and left the mother with a family to raise. Elizabeth had the same dream that many early colonists brought to America ... that this was a land where one could get rich quickly and then return home and make the lives of their loved ones easier. She was determined to come to Canada. Her mother was very opposed to this idea. She feared she would never see her child again. Elizabeth told her Mother not to feel badly, that she would soon be back with a nice little fortune to help her fatherless family. But she never went back. Her
mother and grandmother lived to be very old, both reaching the ... age of about ninety. In later years, she often spoke to her children about her brother, Philip,who seemed to have been an exceedingly clever and successful man.

And so Elizabeth Knoll left her mother and her brothers and sisters and traveled to Canada on the same ship as did her neighbor, Johann Christian Zimmerman. When Rolland Zimmerman visited Altheim in 1983 he discovered that Elizabeth Knoll's family home, Hauptstraze 27, (today Hergert), was about four houses from the Zimmerman home, Hauptstraze 35, therefore only a few houses farther on the same side of the street.. Whether the decision to come to Canada in 1832 was mutual, or whether, as Annie Nelson recalled, their friendship on the long trip was the inspiration for their later marriage, we will never know.

Elizabeth and Christian complied with the custom of those days which was that a wedding must be announced for three successive Sundays in the church before the young people could be married. They were devoted to each other, and their wedded life was exceedingly happy. Elizabeth was a great help to her husband, not only in making a happy home for him, but also in clearing the timber from the land. She helped him pile and burn brush, and sometimes get the logs off the land. She did whatever else there was to do that a woman could do. She was always well, happy and busy, being of the industrious type of woman. She was of medium size and weight, with slightly rounded shoulders. In her later years, she became decidedly round-shouldered. Her eyes were very dark blue, and her hair a very dark brown, almost black. Her hair never turned gray, even in her last days...

The next part of Elizabeth's story is united with that of her husband, Johann Christian Zimmerman (b. 1800). Here we will resume Elizabeth's story after Christian's death.

An inheritance came for Elizabeth from the old country, but a man by the name of Henry Zimmerman, no relative at all and who had no right to it whatsoever, succeeded in getting it away from her.

For a number of years, until Henry, the oldest boy, was ready to marry, the mother and family carried on the work of the farm together--.She built a large wooden barn, and made a few other improvements. Elizabeth had a little cow, "Daisy", that she kept for twenty-two years.

Then as the children became adults, some of them moved on to Minnesota and Elizabeth went with them. Annie continues:

Elizabeth lived with her children in Minnesota until her death, October 18, 1888, at the Adam Zimmerman home three or four miles north of Preston. She was ill only a very short time. Early in the evening of October 18, when asked how she felt and whether she would have any supper, she replied that she did not need any supper, and that by ten o'clock she would be gone to her home in Heaven. Adam's family thought she was delirious, but really not seriously ill. Just before ten o'clock that evening, she passed quietly and peacefully away. No one realized she was going until she was gone. Then they remembered that she had said she would be gone by ten o'clock. She was 78 years and 9 months old. She is buried in the Preston cemetery, with services being held at the German Evangelical Church. Elizabeth had a certain strain of severity in her nature which, occasionally when conditions were right, showed itself. She was a fine disciplinarian and seemed to understand human nature better than most people. She was very tidy about her person, and her room, and was quite saving. She was always fair in her dealings with her fellow-man, but she also expected them to be fair with her. She disliked pictures and statuary very much, and used to say, "ach solcha gotza" (Oh, such idols!) To her, they suggested images, and made her think of idolatry, which was considered a sin. This probably is the reason that we have only one photograph of her, and none of her husband. She was always glad to help along any good cause, but always had so little money to spend. Something always happened to her property because of Henry's mismanagement. She said she did not care much for money for her own use, but that she would like to have had money so that she might give to the church, and help the poor, and give wherever there was a need. She loved to go to church, but it hurt her not to have more to give. Hers was a beautiful life of hardship, sorrow and trials, culminating in a great and glorious victory, and how can we know but that the discipline of this lower life perfected her, and made her ready for that higher service above. "A home in Heaven; what a joyful thought As the poor man toils in his weary lot, His heart oppressed, and with anguish drives From his home below to his home in Heaven."

We have come to the end of our Knoll story. They were comparatively well off citizens in the village of Altheim, Darmstadt, Hesse (now Germany). When her father died suddenly leaving his wife with many children to raise alone, his daughter Elizabeth, age 23 came to Canada with hopes of making a fortune and returning to help those she left behind. Instead she married and raised her own family and was left a young widow herself with many children to care for. She was a pioneer in Canada then she went with her children as they pioneered in Minnesota. She was a strong pioneer woman of great religious faith. We are happy to be among her hundreds of descendants.

Love
Granny

Footnotes
  1. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
    (1958)
  2. Goettel, Steve Lloyd, Britzius, Zimmerman, Maurer Research.
  3. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)).

    Zimmerman Family History and Stories by Mrs. F. C. Nelson Chapter 1 MY FATHER' S PARENTS Page 2 Modes of communication and travel were difficult in those days, and it was a very easy matter to get out of touch with one's relatives. Although the older brother lived only fifty miles away, we know very little about his family. He frequently came down to visit my grandfather, and after my grandfather's death, sometimes visited the family. My father remembers seeing him when he was down on one of those visits, but as my father was only about five years old his recollections of what he said and did are not very vivid. My grandfather?s brother Henry was a cabinetmaker by trade and during the long winters made such furniture as he could use or sell. He made a very wonderful bureau with secret drawers for keeping his money. Banks were not much used in those days, and hiding places for money were always in demand. In some way this piece of furniture came into the possession of my father's brother, Henry. My father?s brother, Henry, also had a table made by him. It was a wonderful piece of work, and took the prize at a provincial fair or show, where Uncle Henry became very much interested in it, and bought it after the show was over. Uncle Henry's daughter, Lydia, remembers this furniture well. My grandfather's brother Henry had a family. There was a boy, Dan, who was a very fine penman which was quite an accomplishment in those days. We also know there were several daughters in the family. On the ocean voyage which was long and tedious, my grandfather met a young lady six years younger than himself, who came from the same part of Germany from which he had come; in fact, she was from a neighboring village, probably Spltzaltheim. Her name was Elizabeth Knell. Her father was dead and her mother was a widow with a family. The mother was very much opposed to her daughter coming to America alone. She feared that she would never see her child again, but E1izabeth was determined and eager to come and try to earn a small fortune. She thought in America money could be earned quickly and easily. She told her mother not to feel bad, that she wou1d soon be back with a nice little sum of money to help the fatherless family along; but she never went back. In later years she often spoke to her children of her brother Philip, who seems to have been an exceedingly clever and successful man. Her mother and grandmother lived to be very old; both reaching the ripe old age of about ninety years. My grandfather fell in love with this young woman on the ocean voyage. They both came to the same part of Canada and after a time were married. They complied with the custom of those days that a wedding must be announced for three successive Sundays in the Church before the young people could be married. They were very devoted to each other and their wedded life was exceedingly happy. She was a great help to her husband not only in making a happy home for him, but also in clearing the timber from the land. She helped him pile and burn brush, and sometimes get the logs off the land, and did whatever else there was to do that a woman could do. She was always well and happy and busy, being an industrious type of woman. She was of medium size and weight, with slightly rounded shoulders. In her later years she became decidedly round-shouldered. Her eyes were very dark blue, and her hair a very dark brown, almost black. Her hair never turned grey even in her last days. My grandfather had brown eyes, dark hair, and very pretty rosy cheeks with a nice clear complexion, better than most women have. He was not skinny, but was a slender man of medium height and weight. They were both devoted Christians, and had a simple, beautiful faith in God, similar to that of other Christian people of their time. One Sunday during a heavy storm the wind was beating the rain into the barn where the freshly thrashed grain was lying. My grandmother, after watching the storm for a while, suggested that they had better go out and try to keep the grain dry; but my grandfather thought that they ought not to break God's Sabbath by doing manual labor. He suggested that God knew that they needed the grain, and if He wished them to have it He would save the crop without their breaking His Holy Sabbath Day. Zimmerman Family History and Stories by Mrs. F. C. Nelson Chapter 1 MY FATHER' S PARENTS Page 3
    In Germany they were Lutherans, but in Canada they joined the German Evangelical Church, and in this church they trained their children in Christian living, and in the doctrines of religion. All their children joined the church and lead Christian lives, probably much above the average. My grandfather was not a very good sportsman, not having had an opportunity for such things in his youth. In Europe this privilege was reserved for the wealthy landlords. But in Canada there was an abundance of deer for all, and other wild game was very plentiful. He seldom shot anything even if the deer fed on his garden. One day a big deer came into the yard and with an old rusty gun he shot it. But the gun gave him such a kick and he felt so bad seeing the beautiful animal lying dead before him that he never tried shooting again. My grandparents built a log cabin on their place. It had two windows and on one side an addition which they used for a summer cook-house. This abode was their happy home. In the winter time they would clear the land of brush and timber; and in the summer they would raise their crop. After the grain was hauled into the barn and thrashed, my grandfather would spend an hour or two daily during the fall, throwing grain. This was the method used to remove the chaff. Some years later they sold two acres of their farm, one for the erection of a blacksmith shop and the other to build a tailor shop. Then a school house was built across from the little log house and a short distance down the road. The little village of Sebringville grew up about a quarter of a mile from the school house. My grandparents had a family of five boys and two girls. Henry, the oldest boy married Mary Krusp. Adam, the second boy, married Eve Hopp; and for his second wife Elizabeth Britzius. Peter, the third boy, married Katherine Rhiel. Christian, the fourth boy, married Louise Nolte and Philip, my father, who was the youngest of the family, married Ernstine Krause. Katherine, the oldest girl, married George Hopp; and the younger daughter, Elizabeth (Betsie), married Christ Regal. Adam and Katherine both married into the same Hopp family, and had a double wedding at Preston, Minnesota. Betsie died at the birth of her first child, the child dying also. None of the boys ever smoked, or drank intoxicating liquors, or used profane language of any kind. They did not even use slang expressions. They believed in saying yea and nay as the bible teaches. It would have been hard to find a finer Christian family anywhere.
    My father was the youngest of the family. He was born January 10, 1851. That spring when the plum trees were in bloom, which must have been in May or June, my grandfather (Christian Zimmerman) died. He was only about 38 years old. For almost a week he had been busy building a dam which necessitated his standing in cold water and mud most of the time while at his work. This brought about his death. He was sick only three or four days. I do not know what doctors would say caused his death. I only know the building of the dam was responsible for it. He was buried in the old Sebringville cemetery with a wooden tombstone on the grave, but now the exact spot of the grave is not known. About forty years ago, probably about 1890, the old cemetery which was back of the Sebringville church was moved to higher ground because the graves filled with water. Such graves as had no one interested in them were abandoned. There were no relatives of my grandfather living there when this was done, so those who might have been interested did not even learn of the change until long after it had been made. So the body was never moved, but lies somewhere in the old cemetery which has been abandoned. Who knows, but it may also be petrified. It is an interesting fact that of the bodies moved, three or four were found perfectly petrified which often happens when bodies are buried in low ground. At the time of grandfather's death the older boys were fourteen and thirteen, and my father who was the youngest was only five or six months old. Very sad and lonely hours followed the breaking up of the once so happy home.

    p.10 The church formed a council of which a man by the name of John Kastner was one of the leading men. The council decided that most of the property should go to the oldest boy, Henry, which was an English custom, and that the other boys should help Henry until they were sixteen, and go to school six months out of every year.

  4. Gordon N. Zimmerman correspondence.
  5. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983).

    History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim


    Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman
    written in response to Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983
    translated by Mrs. Gerald Cleveland of Spring Valley , MN


    There have been many families named Zimmerman from the Thirty Years War till modern times. Most were small farmers, or master wheelwrights, master carpenters, or master weavers. Through several generations, they lived in different houses in the village at Hauptstraze (street) 14, 34, 58, 35; Kirchstraze 11, 23, 25, 33, 35; Baben Hauserstraze 1, 3, and Kreuzstraze 8 and 10. Today there are no more Zimmerman families in Altheim.

    When many inhabitants emigrated in the last century, two families from the Zimmerman circle, and a few single people, also left their hometown of Altheim and emigrated. One family Johann Peter Zimmerman (Family Book II, page 80) went to Slavonia and Yugoslavia, and one family, Leonhard Zimmerman (Family Book II, page 272) went to North America. Among the single people, Johann Christian Zimmerman from Altheim, Hauptstraze 35 (Haag) went to Canada in May of 1832. His brother, Johann Heinrich, followed him in 1837. Elizabeth Dorothea Knoll from Altheim, Hauptstraze 17 (Hergert) emigrated with Johann Christian Zimmerman in May 1832. The two married on their new farm in Canada. Christian Zimmerman, born August 27, 1800, died in 1851 in Canada. His wife, Elizabeth Zimmerman, maiden name Knoll, born January 30, 1809 in Altheim, died October 18, 1888 in Preston, Minnesota, U.S.A., on the Adam Zimmerman farm. A great grandson, Rolland Zimmerman, R.R. #1 Box 26, Racine, Minnesota, 55961, U.S.A., came to Altheim with his family in October, 1983, to visit the hometown of his ancestors. He also visited the house at Hauptstraze 35 from which his great grandfather emigrated with his brothers. His visit gave cause to research the history of the Zimmerman family in Altheim and to record it.

    A Hans Zimmerman is mentioned in Altheim as early as 1558. Due to war, hunger and disease only about 120 of the 360 inhabitants of Altheim remained alive in the Thirty Years War(1618-1648). A Paulus Zimmerman survived the war, a magistrate (but from his handwork, a weaver). He was buried on April 11, 1666. One of his sons could have been Nikolaus Zimmerman of whom descendants still live at Kirchstraze 23 and 33.

    A Johann Peter Zimmerman about 1648 was most probably a son of Paulus Zimmerman, because he was also a magistrate in 1682, and later a village mayor. He died July 20, 1705 at the age of 57. In 1680 he, like other husbandmen (farmers), was assessed a tax of 70 florins, but he was not very able to pay. He owned a poor home, the worth of which amounted to only 30 florins. The worth of his land was 165 florins, and for livestock he had two pair of bad (poor) horses, one cow, one-year-old ox, three pigs. (A good beginning nonetheless, considering the poverty after the war.) In addition 25 florins borrowed from the church building and ten from the parsonage. He had five children. (Family Book I, page 64).

    The wife of the emigrant Christian Zimmerman from Altheim, Hauptstraze 35, was Elizabeth Knoll, who likewise came from Altheim. She came from the house at Hauptstraze 27 (today Hergert), therefore only a few houses farther on the same side of the street. Elizabeth Knoll emigrated to Canada in May of 1832 as did Christian Zimmerman. Therefore they did not become acquainted on the emigrant ship as descendants assumed, rather they must have decided together, back in Altheim, to emigrate to Canada. Elizabeth Knoll was born in Altheim. In earlier times, Altheim was also called Spitzaltheim, because the church in Altheim had a high pointed (spitzen) tower. Elizabeth Dorothea Knoll was born January 30, 1809, and died October 18, 1888 on the Adam Zimmerman farm in the U.S.A. at Preston in Minnesota, allegedly at the age of 76 years, 9 months. Her father in Altheim was Johann Adam Knoll, born October 21, 1778 in Klein-Umstadt (a neighboring village) son of Andread Knoll and Susanne Marg, nee Strumfels. He died in Altheim on January 26, 1806. He married Anne Margarethe, nee Schodt, in Altheim on June 2, 1808. She was from Altheim Hauptstraze 27. Of the eight brothers and sisters of Johann Adam Knoll, two died while yet children, three girls married into families from Altheim, Schaatheim and Harpertshau. Johann Adam Knoll was born August 30, 1813, and remained in the house and continued the line. The oldest daughter, Elizabeth Dorothea Knoll went, according to the traditions of the descendants, to Canada to help out the fatherless
    family with money. The father died at age 48 in 1826. However Knoll family was not without means at that time. Her mother's parents owned what for Altheim was quite a good piece of property at Hauptstraze 27. The parents, Philipp Schodt, born 1738, and Anna Margarethe Schodt, (married 1760) had two sons. Johann Martin and Johann Philipp who married someone from outside Altheim. The daughter, Anna Margarethe Schodt, stayed in her parents home and married Johann Adam Knoll from Klein Umstadt. In 1804 the property consisted of a two story house (that still stands today and has an arched gate), a barn and stable, on fourth Morgen (a measure of land six to nine tenths of an acre) garden, thirty four Morgen fields, three and three-fourths Morgen meadows, value of the property 200 florins. In 1848 the property was passed on to the son (inherited) who was again called Johann Adam Knoll, born August 29, 1813, and married Katherine Elizabeth Appell on June 12, 1836 (first wife). The son, Johann Nikolaus Knoll I took over the house and farm in 1871. His son was Johann Nikolaus Knoll II. His oldest daughter, Anna Marie Knoll, born February 5, 1817 married the farmer, Friedrich Heinrich Funck, who died at an advanced age, and passed the property on to the Hergert family. The farm yard had 617 sq. meters and the meadow 428 sq. M.

    It is understandable that from the many children in the family, two sons would decide to emigrate. At that time poverty ruled in the villages and there was a great lack of opportunities for work. The small farming businesses were not in a position to support families with many children.

    The son who remained in the house, Johann Valentin (Family Book II, page 259) had two daughters and one son. The son, Johann Nickolaus, born February .21, 1859 and died April 10, 1916, remained again in the house. (Family Book III, page 74). On February 9, 1873 he married Marie Gobel, born August 22, 1848, and died April 2, 1924. The three children were Katharine, born October 21, 1873; Elise, born June 10, 1879, and Johann Georg, born October 5, 1882.

    Georg Zimmerman, born October 5, 1881, died October 12, 1960 in Altheim. (Family Book III, page 232) George was the last descendant in the Zimmerman family line. On April .14, 1912 he married Friederike

    Funck, born July 1, 1885 in Hergershausen. She died July 2, 1960.They left two daughters, Elizabeth Zimmerman, born April 6, 1913 and died January 12, 1962, and Katharina, born September 13, 1914. Katha Haag, nee Zimmerman, still lives to day in the parent house of the Zimmerman family at Altheim, Haupstraze 35. On December 19, 1942 she married Jakob Haag, a civil servant, who died December 26, 1974.

    In 1907, Nikolaus Zimmerman had the old half-timbered house torn down, and the present house built with attic and superstructure over the gate, finished on the outside with rock or brick. In 1973, the sonin-law, Karl Hunkel, gained extra living space by adding a construction over the gatehouse. In the upper story, Karl Hunkel and his wife Hildegard, nee Haag, and their children Regina, Matthias and Carmen, live. The yard has 621 square meters, the meadow and grassed area behind it has 767 square meters.

    "What you inherit from your fathers you must pass on in order to keep."

    "And I heard a voice from heaven say to me: 'Write: Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, Father, Master from now on. The spirit speaks, that they rest from their work, because their works follow them."'

    Of the five children of Johann Peter Zimmerman, the three sonst Johann Peter, Nickel Matthias, and Andreas left numerous descendants. These can be followed in a tabular summary.

    We are interested in the line of Nickel Matthias Zimmerman, which stretches into the present.

    Nickel Matthias Zimmerman was born October 16, 1677 and died April 13, 1731. He had seven children. (Family Book I, page 66.) Of the two sons, Johann Jost Zimmerman continues the line.

    6. Johann Jost Zimmerman, born. August 23, 1713 and died January, 1792 (Family Book I, page 66a), had four children. Of his-two sons, Johann Bernhard continues the line.

    5. Johann Bernhard Zimmerman, born June 2, 1743 and died April 19, 1800. Married on September 17, 1772 in the house of Johann Valentin Appel at Hauptstraze 35, and was "coupled'' with his daughter, Anna Sybilla. Johann Valentin Appel and Anna Sybilla, nee Appel, had seven children. Anna died in childbirth with the seventh child, who was born dead. Bernhard Zimmerman married four more times: 1783, 1793, 1799 and 1802. From the first marriage, Johann Peter Zimmerman continues the line.

    4. Johann Peter Zimmerman, born December 11, 1773 and died July 7, 1852 in Altheim. He left ten children. (Family Book II, page 66.) Of them, Johann Christian Zimmerman, born August 17, 1800 went to Canada, in May of 1832. Elizabeth Knoll from Hauptstraze 27, born January 30, 1809, emigrated with him to America. They did not first become acquainted on the ship as assumed by descendants, but rather already knew one another in Altheim. The brother, Johann Henrich Zimmerman, born September 14, 1815 followed in 1837. He was not older as assumed by descendants, but fifteen years younger. Both brothers received a farm with 100 acres of land in Canada from the English government near Sebringville in Ontario.

    The two sons that remained in Altheim have descendants, Johann Valentin Zimmerman, born January 11, 1810 and died August 27, 1837, stayed in the same house at Hauptstraze 35. The father, Johann Peter Zimmerman had only a small rural property which consisted of a two-story house, barn, cow-barn, pig pen, ten and one-half morgan field, two morgen meadows; worth of property was 960 florins. Of Peter Zimmerman's ten children, two drowned in the stream behind the house: Anna Maria,- born 1804 and drowned September 21, 1806; and Johann Peter, born 1807 and died December 9, 1810."
    translated by Mrs. Gerald Cleveland of Spring Valley

  6. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED86.
  7. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983 ).
  8. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED86.
  9. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983).
  10. Zimmerman, Forrest- notes from conversation with.
  11. Goettel, Steve Lloyd, Britzius, Zimmerman, Maurer Research.
  12. Census, Federal - 1870 - Mower Co., MN, town of Racine, Ancestry p.4 of 14.
    (4 Jun 1870)

    Dwelling # 59 Family # 59

    Zimmerman, Peter age 27 farmer RE=$3000 PE=$200 b. Canada
    Catherine 25 Can
    Anna 1 MN
    Elizabeth 60 Hesse Darmstadt

  13. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983 ), pp.28,29.

    p. 28 The wife of the emigrant Christian Zimmerman from Altheim, Hauptstraze 35, was Elizabeth Knoll, who likewise came from Altheim. She came from the house at Hauptstraze 27 (today Hergert), therefore only a few houses farther on the same side of the street. Elizabeth Knoll emigrated to Canada in May of 1832 as did Christian Zimmerman. Therefore they did not become acquainted on the emigrant ship as descendants assumed, rather they must have decided together, back in Altheim, to emigrate to Canada. Elizabeth Knoll was born in Altheim. In earlier times, Altheim was also called Spitzaltheim, because the church in Altheim had a high pointed (spitzen) tower. Elizabeth Dorothea Knoll was born January 30, 1809, and died October 18, 1888 on the Adam Zimmerman farm in the U.S.A. at Preston in Minnesota, allegedly at the age of 76 years, 9 months. Her father in Altheim was Johann Adam Knoll, born October 21, 1778 in Klein-Umstadt (a neighboring village) son of Andread Knoll and Susanne Marg, nee Strumfels. He died in Altheim on January 26, 1806. He married Anne Margarethe, nee Schodt, in Altheim on June 2, 1808. She was from Altheim Hauptstraze 27. Of the eight brothers and sisters of Johann Adam Knoll, two died while yet children, three girls married into families from Altheim, Schaatheim and Harpertshau. Johann Adam Knoll was born August 30, 1813, and remained in the house and continued the line. The oldest daughter, Elizabeth Dorothea Knoll went, according to the traditions of the descendants, to Canada to help out the fatherless
    p. 29 family with money. The father died at age 48 in 1826. However Knoll family was not without means at that time. Her mother's parents owned what for Altheim was quite a good piece of property at Hauptstraze 27. The parents, Philipp Schodt, born 1738, and Anna Margarethe Schodt, (married 1760) had two sons. Johann Martin and Johann Philipp who married someone from outside Altheim. The daughter, Anna Margarethe Schodt, stayed in her parents home and married Johann Adam Knoll from Klein Umstadt. In 1804 the property consisted of a two story house (that still stands today and has an arched gate), a barn and stable, on fourth Morgen (a measure of land six to nine tenths of an acre) garden, thirty four Morgen fields, three and three-fourths Morgen meadows, value of the property 200 florins. In 1848 the property was passed on to the son (inherited) who was again called Johann Adam Knoll, born August 29, 1813, and married Katherine Elizabeth Appell on June 12, 1836 (first wife). The son, Johann Nikolaus Knoll I took over the house and farm in 1871. His son was Johann Nikolaus Knoll II. His oldest daughter, Anna Marie Knoll, born February 5, 1817 married the farmer, Friedrich Heinrich Funck, who died at an advanced age, and passed the property on to the Hargert family. The farm yard had 617 sq. meters and the meadow 428 sq. M.

  14. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)).

    p.10 An inheritance came for my grandmother from the old country; but a man by the name of Henry Zimmerman, who was not a relative and who had no right to it whatever, succeeded in getting it away from her.
    For a number of years until Henry, the oldest boy, was ready to marry, the mother and fami1y carried on the work of the farm together. She built a large wooden barn, and made a few other improvements. I was interested to learn that grandmother had a little cow "Daisy" that she kept for twenty two years.
    The Greys were among their friends at this time. After Henry was married he built a brick house for himself, but my grandmother continued to live in the old house. Some time later Henry sold the place to a Mr. Strasser and my grandmother came to the United States to live with some of her children (most were living in Minnesota). She seemed to be grieved because Henry did not succeed as well on the old place as she thought he should. Whatever property she may have had was lost in some way through Henry's mismanagement.

  15. Kneil, Elizabeth - photo of tombstone.

    [Methodist Cemetery, Preston, MN]

  16. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
  17. Zimmerman History Packet Received from J. Rose 26 Feb 2005.

    (Henry) always lived in Canada. He was a large man. Started farming but lost farm. He then went into bee business, having as high as 400 swarms. He made good from the sale of honey for a long time.

    Canadian custom (adopted from Engand) expected oldest son to care for parents. When he lost his porperty his mother, Elizabeth, went to stay with her son at Preston, Minnesota.

  18. Census, Canada - 1901 - Ontario, Elgin (West/Quest), Aldborough, ancestry p. 85 of 111.

    line 22 29 31

    Zimmerman, Henry head feb 16 1835 66 b. O>R Evangelical Occ: Bee-Keeper own acct
    Mary E. wife Mar 31 1834 67 Ger imm: 1846 Evan.
    Albert son Aug 2 1874 26 O>R Meth. Artist - employed 12 mos, earnings: $900

  19. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)).

    Chap. 1; p. 4 After Henry was married he built a brick home for himself, but my grandmother continued to live in the old house. Sometime later Henry sold the place to a Mr. Strasser and my grandmother cvame to the United States to live with some of her children (most were living in Minnesota.) She seemed to be grieved because Henry did not succeed as well on the place as she thought he should. Whatever property she may have had was lost in some way through Henry's mismanagement.

    Chap 3; p. 12 - My father's oldest brother Henry lived near Sebringville,Ontario, Canada for quite a number of years after he married. Then he moved onto a farm at Downie, four miles from Stratford, and then later into the town of Rodney. In his old age he came west to be with his children and lived in Watsonville, california. His wife died in January, three months before they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, which was to have taken place April 9, 1906. A year or two later, at the age of 73, Uncle Henry passed quietly away, there being no apparent cause of his death except old age.




    1952 Update
    Chap. 6; p. 3 - All of Uncle Henry's children except Albert, the youngest, who went to Australia, came to the
    state of Washington, usually about the time they were of age and from there scattered to various parts of
    the West. Edward, the next to the youngest in this family of eight children is the only one now living.
    For many years he lived in Watsonville, California where he was the operator of a creamery of which he
    owned half interest. When Uncle Henry first came to California, he made his home with this son until the
    death of his wife. Some years later when ill health began to trouble Edward a bit, he sold his interest in
    the creamery and moved to Vallejo, where he took a job with the government. Then because of his age he
    gave up his government job and became the caretaker of the Presbyterian Church of which they were
    members. Later on account of failing health they moved to Cloverdale, California. They bought a nice

    Zimmerman Family History and Stories by Mrs. F. C. Nelson
    Chapter 6 Updated to 1952 Page 4

    home there and are living there now. Of late, he is an invalid, suffering from a stroke which was brought
    on by a fall. It has affected his ability to talk and move about. It makes one feel sorry to see him carry
    this kind of a cross, but he never complains about anything and just makes the best of it. He has two
    daughters, Lucille and Iva, who now have families of their own. Both girls attended San Jose State
    College. Lucille after graduating taught school for five years before her marriage to Edwin Schleuter.
    She now lives in San Anselmo, California. She has two children, Bill and Gary. Iva, after doing college
    work in San Jose, went into training at Merritt Hospital in Oakland and graduated from there in 1938.
    She is married to Louis Jacobsen and lives in Salem, Oregon. She has three children, Roger, Carol, and
    Shirley.

    John, the oldest in Uncle Henry's family, lived in eastern Washington on a large wheat farm.
    Death came to him in 1938 at the age of eighty-two of a heart attack. He had two daughters, Blessing and
    Margaret. Blessing is the only one now living of John's family.

    I never became much acquainted with Dan, Peter, or Will and know very little about them except
    that Dan lived in or near Everett, Washington; that he had no children and that he died of heart trouble in
    1936 at the age of seventy-eight.

    Will developed a tumor of the brain which brought on other complications and caused his death in
    1932 at the age of 69. He had one son, Sidney, who lives in Seattle.

    Peter lived in Everett, Washington. He had four children, Henry, Edna, Clarence and Albert. He
    passed away in 1933 at the age of seventy-two. He was confined to his bed for a long time before his
    death with a creeping paralysis.

    Lydia married Will Rice who taught school near Watsonville, California, when they first came to
    California. Later he secured a job in a government office and they lived in Oakland, California most of
    the time, where they bought a nice little home. They left the Methodist Church where they were attending
    and became very devoted Christian Scientists. She passed away in 1948 at the age of seventy-nine.
    Death was caused by cancer of the kidney. They never had any children. It was here that Uncle Henry's
    wife died while on a visit with her daughter Lydia, but she is buried in Watsonville.

    Mary Ann, the older of the two girls, was married to Otis Schleuter, who had a position as
    trainmaster with the Santa Fe Railroad Co., for whom he worked for over fifty years. He is now retired
    and lives in Cloverdale, California. It was here that Mary Ann passed away in 1950 from cancer of the
    liver, at the age of eighty-four. After the death of Uncle Henry's wife, Mary Ann, who was then living in
    New Mexico, came and got her father that he might live with her. So it came about that Uncle Henry died
    and is buried in New Mexico.

    Albert is the youngest in the family. He left the old home in Canada, and went to Australia, where
    he acquired a fortune in the exporting and importing business, most of which he lost in World War II in
    the trouble with Japan. He had two children, George and June. He died in 1936 at the age of sixty-two.

  20. Ancestry.com, MessageBoard - kdallenpr.
    (Sep 26 4:16 AM GMT)
  21. Anna Zimmerman Nelson, History of Christian and Elizabeth Zimmerman, updated (pages 32-40 of the Zimmerman History Packet received by DZStevens from J Rose on 26 Feb 2005).

    At the time of Christian's death, the older boys were fourteen and thirteen

  22. Ancestry.com, 1901 Census.
  23. Gordon Zimmerman phone call 12 Nov 2005.
  24. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)).

    [This source says Henry died in New Mexico where he was living with his daughter Mary Ann]

  25. Lloyd, Steve, Zimmerman, Christian - descendants (EMail).
  26. Adam Zimmerman Estate Papers, Clackamas County Court, state of Oregon; 3 Apr1899 - 3 Mar 1902 (County Court, State of Oregon, County of Clackamas - 28 Jun 1899 until 3 Mar 1902), page 1.
  27. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore County, Minnesota, Carrolton twsp, p. 281A; Ancestry p. 17 of 21.
    (23 Jun 1880)

    Line 47 Dwelling 138 Household 138

    Zimmerman, Adam age 44 Farmer Canada Ger Ger
    Elizabeth 35 wife Keeping House Ohio Ger Ger
    Lizzie 20 dau MN Can Ger
    Mary 19 dau MN Can Ger

    Next page
    William 14 son MN Can Ger
    Emmie 10 dau MN Can Ohio
    Arien 5 son MN Can OH
    Clara 3 dau MN Can OH
    George 8/12 son MN Can OH
    Joseph, Emile 17 servant Farm hand Ger Ger Ger

  28. Anna Zimmerman Nelson, History of Christian and Elizabeth Zimmerman, updated (pages 32-40 of the Zimmerman History Packet received by DZStevens from J Rose on 26 Feb 2005).
  29. Census, Minnesota Territorial and State, 1849- 1905 - 1885 - Fillmore, Carrolton, pp. 4-5.

    Family 46

    Adam Zimmerman age 49 b. Canada
    Mrs. A " 42 Ohio
    Lizzie 26 MN
    M.A. (mary) 24 MN
    William 13 MN
    Emma 14 MN
    Aren 10 MN
    Clara 8 MN
    George 5 MN
    Mage 2 MN
    Sarah 1 MN

    [This one is from 1885]

  30. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)), Ch3; p. 12.

    Adam Zimmerman, my father's second brother, lived near Preston, Minnesota on a farm until most
    of his children were grown. Then he followed them into the West to the state of Oregon, and bought a
    home for himself in that state at Canby. At one time he had been thrown from a horse and injured,
    causing hernia, so that for many years he was compelled to wear a truss. Shortly before he started for
    Oregon he came in touch with the Zionist movement in Chicago. They had a program of divine healing
    and told him to throw away his truss; that God was able to take care of him. He finally did throw it away
    and his old trouble, hernia, soon killed him. He died very suddenly in Canby, Oregon, at the age of about
    67 years. He was a very robust, healthy man, and if he had continued to wear his truss, or if he had had an
    operation, he probably could have lived many years longer. He left a widow and eight children to mourn
    his loss.

    His oldest daughter, Lizzie, married Mr. Krack, a farmer who lived near Cavalier, North Dakota.
    The second child was a boy whom they called Willie, who died of pneumonia contracted while he was
    drilling a well. He was about thirty years of age when he died, and had never been married. When he
    was a small child he lost an eye by getting lye into it while his mother was making soap. The third child,
    Mary, was never married. When she was eighteen she had a stroke of paralysis from which she never
    entirely recovered. After doctoring for a number of years and receiving very little help she came out to
    Portland with a half-sister, and went into business for herself. She always was successful and spent a very
    profitable life. Her half-sister Emma after a few years married Charlie Druschel, and still lives in
    Portland, Oregon. Aron, the oldest boy with the second wife has a family and lives in or near Chicago,
    Illinois. George, who is Aron's younger brother, married a woman eight years older, and lives in
    Washington State somewhere. Sarah, the next to the youngest in the family, married a Mr. Gunter and
    also lives in Portland. Margaret works in an undertaking establishment and was never married; and Della
    lives with her at least part of the time. She is not married [and both live in Seattle, 1952].

  31. Census, Minnesota Territorial and State, 1849- 1905 - 1885 - Fillmore, Carrolton, 1865 state Census.

    108 Adam Zimmerman (Male)
    Eve " (female)
    Elizabeth " "
    Mary " "
    Henry " (Male)
    William " "

  32. Zimmerman, Forrest- notes from conversation with.
  33. Adam Zimmerman Estate Papers, Clackamas County Court, state of Oregon; 3 Apr1899 - 3 Mar 1902 (County Court, State of Oregon, County of Clackamas - 28 Jun 1899 until 3 Mar 1902), p. 1.
  34. Census, Federal - 1880 - Martin Co., MN, Fraser Twsp ED154.

    Name: George Hoff
    [George Hopp]
    [George Hopp]
    Age: 49
    Birth Year: abt 1831
    Birthplace: Alsach
    Home in 1880: Fraser, Martin, Minnesota
    Race: White
    Gender: Male
    Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
    Marital Status: Married
    Spouse's Name: Sarah Hoff
    Father's Birthplace: Alsach
    Mother's Birthplace: Alsach
    Neighbors: View others on page
    Occupation: Farmer
    Household Members:
    Name Age
    George Hoff 49
    Sarah Hoff 39
    John Hoff 19
    Jacob Hoff 17
    Matilda Hoff 15
    Emma Hoff 13
    George Hoff 11
    Henry Hoff 9
    Lydia Hoff 7
    Catherine Hoff 5
    Maggie Hoff 4m

    [Katherine is no longer living.]

  35. Zimmerman History Packet Received from J. Rose 26 Feb 2005.
  36. Census, Minnesota Territorial and State, 1849- 1905 - 1875 - Martin, Fraser, 1875 - p.3.

    Line 3 Family #34

    Geo Hopp 44 M France France France
    C " 36 F Canada Germany Germany
    John " 13 M MN France Canada
    J. 12 " " " "
    Til " 10 " same
    Emma " 8 "
    Geo. 6 M
    Henry 4 "
    S 1 F

  37. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)).

    Chapter 3; p. 2 - About a quarter of a mile from the little house where my parents started housekeeping lived their nearest neighbor, a family by the name of Schwartz; and about a mile and a half to the northeast lived my father's sister, Mrs. George Hopp

    Chap 6; p. 7 - My father's sister, Katherine, who married George Hopp, had a family of five children. Of these I knew Cousin George Hopp the best. He was a very dear cousin and attended the University of Minnesota while I was attending Hamline University, and I saw him a great deal. He became an exceptionally successful lawyer and banker and traveled abroad a great deal in connection with his business. In 1943 while he was living in Northfield, Minnesota, he passed suddenly away one February morning from a heart attack; leaving a wife and two children. We were sorry to lose this cousin, but such is the way of life. The other children in the Hopp family were John, Jacob, Mati1da and Kathrin. They visited us occasionally when I was a child and my folks lived on the farm. In later years however, they all moved to the state of Washington and we were not in touch with them, so I know very little about them now. George Hopp, the father of these children married again and had a second family, but I do not know them. Strictly speaking this family would not be related to us.

  38. Census, Minnesota Territorial and State, 1849- 1905 - 1885 - Fillmore, Carrolton, 1865.

    # 94

    George Hopp
    Catharine "
    John "
    Michael "
    Albert "

  39. Census, Federal - 1880 - Martin Co., MN, Fraser Twsp ED154, p. 5.
    (Jun 1880)
  40. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
  41. Census, Federal - 1870 - Mower Co., MN, town of Racine, Ancestry p.4 of 14.
    (4 Jun 1870)

    Dwelling # 59 Family # 59

    Zimmerman, Peter age 27 farmer RE=$3000 PE=$200 b. Canada
    Catherine 25 Can
    Anna 1 MN
    Elizabeth 60 Hesse Darmstadt

  42. Anna Zimmerman Nelson, History of Christian and Elizabeth Zimmerman, updated (pages 32-40 of the Zimmerman History Packet received by DZStevens from J Rose on 26 Feb 2005).

    Peter was a serious, quiet man with dark hair, a sandy mustache, and intense deep gray eyes. He was very proficient in reading and writing the German language, but sometimes had difficulty with English. He wanted his family to use the German language at home, but Catherine thought that this would be wrong, as they were Americans now.

    Christ decided to go west and pan for gold in Montana, where he earned $7.00 or $8.00 a day. Later, during the gold rush, he moved on to Oregon. Finally, he went back to Canada where he married Louise Nolte and settled on a farm. In later years, he operated a prune orchard.

    Peter stayed in Minnesota where he bought 160 acres of land in Racine township of Mower County. It was the last section to be cleared, and he paid twice as much for it as others had paid for the land around it. At the same time, he could have bought land where St. Paul now
    stands for less than half of what he paid for the land he chose. He
    built a three-room house with a kitchen, bedroom and a pantry. Later,
    when he was courting Catherine Rhiel, he walked twenty-five miles to
    Preston to see her. Another time he borrowed a buggy from old man
    Felch to make the trip. Catherine had come from Canada when she was.
    twenty-one, and stayed with her half-sister, Mary Long.

    Peter and Catherine were married January 14, 1868, and lived in the frame house near Racine. The first winter, Catherine was so homesick that she rode to Preston in a bobsled, sitting on a box. She stayed a week and then was ready to come home.

    They had six children, all born at Racine. Anna married Sam Anstett, divorced, and moved to North Dakota. George died when he was eleven. Margaret Lydia married Julius Krause, and they went to California. John William married Zora Haas, and they remained on the farm at Racine. Matilda married William Hunnerkoch of Red Wood Falls, Minnesota, and they moved to Montana. Ida (Katie) married Roy Drummond, and they lived in Austin, Minnesota.

  43. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)), ch. 3; pp. 12 &13.

    Peter Zimmerman and his brother Christ, came to Minnesota after the Civil War ended in 1865. They worked in a shingle mill all summer in Stillwater, Minnesota. Each earned about $14.00 a week, and Peter saved about $1,000. The next spring, they went to Stillwater again, but the river was too high to work at the shingle mill, so the brothers came to Preston and found work there. Because he was afraid he would be robbed, Peter pretended to be poor, and worked his way down the Mississippi on a boat, and left the river at Winona



    Peter Zimmerman, my father's third brother, lived near Racine. Minnesota on a farm, but died
    while he was yet in the prime of life, with cancer of the large intestine. He left a wife and family of five
    children; four girls and one boy.

  44. Ibid., Ch 6; p. 5.

    Many changes have coma into the Peter Zimmerman family in these last twenty years. Peter was
    married to Katherine Rhiel. After Peter's death Katherine and her only son, John, who was in his teens at
    the time of his father's death, carried on the work of the farm for a while. Then the son married Zora
    Haas, and took over the farm with its beautiful home. Katherine died in 1902. Now at the time of this
    writing the son, John Zimmerman is an elderly man. His wife has been dead for some time. He has sold
    the old home and lives in Rochester, Minnesota. His daughter Ruth, who is an instructor in art in
    Rochester, lives with him. He has three boys. Rolland, the oldest, is the twin brother of Ruth, and has a
    very nice farm near Racine, Minnesota. Vernon is a biology instructor at Appleton High School,
    Wisconsin. Lloyd, the youngest, is also a farmer and has a farm near Racine, Minnesota. John himself
    has retired from active farm work.

  45. Census, Federal 1880, Racine, Mower, Minnesota.

    Name: Peter Zimmerman
    [Pieter Zimmerman]
    [Pieter]
    Age: 36
    Birth Year: abt 1844
    Birthplace: Canada
    Home in 1880: Racine, Mower, Minnesota
    Race: White
    Gender: Male
    Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
    Marital Status: Married
    Spouse's Name: Kate
    Father's Birthplace: Hesse
    Mother's Birthplace: Hesse
    Neighbors: View others on page
    Occupation: Farmer
    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
    View Image
    Household Members: Name Age
    Pieter Zimmerman 36
    Kate Zimmerman 35
    Anna Zimmerman 10
    George Zimmerman 9
    Lydia Zimmerman 7
    John Zimmerman 3
    Matilda Zimmerman 1

  46. Ancestry.com.
  47. Ibid., kdallenpr family tree - obituary.

    #1 Obituary
    Died at his home, Mr. Peter Zimmermann, aged 50 years, 6 months and 4 days. Mr. Zimmerman was one of our early and most respected citizens, and a hard worker until about three years ago, when his health failed him, and although he suffered much he complained not. He leaves a wife and five children, many friends and neighbors, to mourn his loss. He was a member of the Evangelical Church and a zealous worker. Funeral servicee were conducted by Rev. Schmids and Rev. Goetz. We sympathize deeply with the family in their sort affliction.

    #2 Obituary
    Mr. Peter Zimmerman, brother of Mr. Phillipp Zimmerman, aged 51 years, and a native of Canada, died on Tuesday morning, February 16, of cancer of the bowels. Mr. Zimmerman was an upright citizen, an excellent neighbor and friend, and has lived in Racine for many years. The funeral took place in the Evangelical Church of which he was a member, on Thursday at 10 o'clock, Rev. G. B. Goetz officiating.

    [spelling errors are as in original]

  48. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
  49. Census, Federal - 1880 - Island, Washington Terr., Whidby & Camain Islands, ED # 37, p.14 of 23.
    (12 Jun 1880)

    ["Cris" is head logger at a logging camp on Whidby & Camain Islands, Washington. His nephew, John Hopp is in his unit.]

  50. George S. Zimmerman, Biography of Christian Zimmerman (written 1974-75, privately circulated).

    The following story was written by Christian's son George:
    Biography of Christian Zimmerman, brother of Peter Zimmerman
    by George S. Zimmerman written at age 90, 1974, 1975

    This story begins in spring of 1868, when father was 20 years old. He had been
    working in Minneapolis, Minnesota in flour mill and woolen mill during winter
    1867-1868. He wanted to go west so traveled down Mississippi River to mouth of
    Missouri River. Voyage was by boat . As money was scarce with him, he took job
    on river boat going up Missouri River to Fort Benton Montana. One of his jobs
    was to load wood into boats boilers.

    As they neared Fort Benton at a wood loading dock, he saw where a white man
    delivering wood on steamboat dock, was murdered and scalped. His clothes were
    stolen from his body and he was left laying by the wood dock.

    At Fort Benton he took a job driving a team of mules hauling freight to
    Helena, Montana. This was the winter of 1868-69. This was a bitter cold job and
    he suffered greatly.

    In the spring of 1869 or 1870 he quit the teamster job at Helena. He met a
    man by the nane of Thomas Cruse. They took up a mining claim together and
    started working it at Nelson Creek.

    This was a very lawless country. Father never carried a gun in his entire life.
    They worked this claim together. At night thieves would come and rob sluice
    boxes. There was lots of gun play around. Father was used to this rough life.
    But one morning he had had enough. He rolled up his blankets and started West.
    He left everything to his partner, Thomas Cruse. He never went back or
    remained in contact with Mr. Cruse.

    After six months or a year, he learned that Thomas Cruse had struck it rich.
    He had quit the country for good and never regretted it. Lawlessness was
    everywhere. Would he be the next one to be scalped, or murdered by white men if
    he tried to protect his property at night. Before he left, he never signed any
    release papers with Thomas Cruse for his half of original claim.

    He traveled westward, working his way an opportunity afforded. He landed in
    Palouse country of South East Washington at harvest time. After Harvest, he
    worked his way down the Columbia River basin to Portland, Oregon. Just how long
    it took him, we have no record. How long he stayed in Portland and later the
    Mt. St. Helens area, we have no record.

    It was a rainy, cold winter and he took down with chills and fever. In Portland
    he met a man who advised him to go to Puget Sound country around Tacoma or
    Seattle. The chills and fever left him in this salt water country.

    The first winter he and his partner fished for salmon and packed them in salt
    for boats that came into Seattle Harbor. How long he worked at this, I do not
    know.

    The next record we have, he and another partner went up into Canada's Peace
    River Country and took up a mining claim. Just how well he fared there is not
    known.

    When I (George Zimmerman) was quite a small boy, I remember we had a
    teacup 1/3 full of gold nuggets from this undertaking.

    He then returned to Puget Sound and secured work in a logging camp on Whidby
    Island getting out logs for California bound log rafts. The company for
    which he was working went bankrupt and for his accumulated wages he took
    title to 40 acres of timber believed to have been on Vashon Island. He
    worked long enough in the timber industry to learn business. Logging was
    done by ox team. He went out and purchased 3 or 4 yoke of oxen and was
    in the logging business.

    We have his old time book which indicates he began logging June 12th
    1877. We also have his old legal records that show he purchased a lot at
    Third and Bell Streets in Seattle and kept it until he had moved to
    Yamhill, Oregon during 1887. This land is now part of the Seattle Center
    Worlds Fair Complex.

    The 1880 U.S. Census show Zimmerman Logging Company with 12 people
    working. It shows fathers age as 31. The census also shows a Chinese Cook
    and Oilers.

    He left to go up Missouri River in 1868 and logging in 1877. These 9
    years are very sketchy, and few positive dates can be set.

    In 1910 he sold the family farm 2 miles North of Yamhill Oregon to me. He
    then built a new house on a hill just to the North of this farm, that he
    had purchased in 1887 from the John J. Burton Estate, the original
    homesteading family of this land.

    In 1929 a man stopped at Zimmerman Bros. Elevator on Railroad East of
    Yamhill where my brother, Edward Zimmerman was working. He said his name
    was William A. Jackson and be had lived in Helena, Montana. He wanted to
    know if the Zimmermans here had been in Helena, Montana in the very early
    days. He said in 1914 there was a suit to clear title of land held by Thomas
    Cruse in Partnership with Christian Zimmerman who could not be located,
    and was presumed dead.

    My brother Ed took the man home and fed him, for Mr. Jackson was down on
    his luck. Ed then asked his father if he had ever been in Partnership
    with Thomas Cruse in Helena, Montana. Yes he had been a partner and the
    strike that made Thomas Cruse a Multi-Millionare was made after Father
    had left.

    Christian Zimmerman had never told his four sons of his life in Montana
    until this time in 1929. He had never contacted Thomas Cruse. He never
    realized that for years he still owned a share in a very large mining
    operation near Helena, Montana.

    My Father, Christian Zimmerman died August, 1934 at Yamhill Oregon.

    [p. 5&6 of Zimmerman Family History Packet received 26 Feb 2005]

  51. Gordon N. Zimmerman, Song of Yamhill (Binford & Mort Publishing, 2005; Library of Congress # 2005007854), p. 8 - 11.
  52. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)).

    Peter Zimmerman and his brother Christ, came to Minnesota after the Civil War ended in 1865. They worked in a shingle mill all summer in Stillwater, Minnesota. Each earned about $14.00 a week, and Peter saved about $1,000. The next spring, they went to Stillwater again, but the river was too high to work at the shingle mill, so the brothers came to Preston and found work there. Because he was afraid he would be robbed, Peter pretended to be poor, and worked his way down the Mississippi on a boat, and left the river at Winona...

    Christ decided to go west and pan for gold in Montana, where he earned $7.00 or $8.00 a day. Later, during the gold rush, he moved on to Oregon. Finally, he went back to Canada where he married Louise Nolte and settled on a farm. In later years, he operated a prune orchard.


  53. Census, Federal 1900.

    Line 10 Dwelling # 71 Family # 71 Farm # 5 Owned

    Zimmerman, Christ head b. Aug 1848 age 51 m18 yrs Can(FR) Ger Ger nat. 1866 citizen 34 yrs OCC: Farmer
    Louise N. wife Apr 1857 43 18 Can (Fr) Can Can 1884 16 7 chil b/4 liivng
    Frank B son Feb 1883 17 Can(Fr) Can Can 1884 16
    Samuel G son Feb 1885 15 OR Can Can
    Christ P son Aug 1886 13 OR Can Can
    Edward son Jun 1891 9 OR Can Can

  54. Christian Zimmerman Family Sheet #1.
  55. Ibid.
  56. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)), p. 9.

    and the younger daughter, Elizabeth (Betsie), married Christ Regal ...Betsie died at the birth of her first child, the child dying also.

  57. Census, Federal - 1880 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED86, 436 D.

    Zimmermon, Philip self age 29 Can Darmstadt Darmstadt Occ: Farmer
    Ernestine wife 27 Prussia Prussia Prussia Keeping House
    Anna dau 5 MN Can Prussia
    Julius son 3 " " "
    Albert son 2 " " "
    Larson Chris other 23 Norway Nor Nor works on farm

  58. Census, Federal - 1900 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp ED 37.
  59. Census, Federal - 1910 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Twsp. ED 35, p. 1B.
    (30 Apr 1910)
  60. Census, Federal - 1920 - Fillmore Co., MN, Spring Valley Village, p. 10A.
    (9 Jan 1920)
  61. Forrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman Family Tree.
  62. Zimmerman History Packet Received from J. Rose 26 Feb 2005.
  63. Annie Marie Zimmerman Nelson, Zimmerman Family History and Stories;forward by Allan Leslie VanLehn (Unpublished work (c) 2008 by (ALVL)).

    p.10 For more than twenty years that school was conducted by a Mr. Hamilton. He was a school master of the old type, who did not believe in spoiling the child by sparing the rod. In the home too, children were punished most severely in those days, sometimes at very slight provocations. I have heard my father tell of how a lamp chimney was broken in some way. It was thought that he could have prevented it if he had been watching the children more cautiously, so he had to be whipped. Thirty-nine strokes was the punishment. Nowadays we would consider such treatment beyond all reason, and some people think that one should not punish a child at all. A generation or two makes a great change in people?s thinking. ...

    When my father was fourteen years old, Henry being in need of money, advised him to work for someone who would pay him a salary. So it came about that he was employed by an old Scotchman for six months for ten dollars a month and board. When the six months were up the Scotchman paid him the salary in silver dollars. My father carried those sixty silver dollars home six miles to Uncle Henry, who then gave him seventy five cents out of it for spending money. This was the first spending money that my father had ever had and it is interesting to note how he spent it. First he says he bought a comb for himself thinking how fine it would be to have one all his very own. Then as most boys would have done he bought a jackknife, and with what money there was left he bought candy to treat his brothers. He was badly in need of a suit of clothes at this time so that he could go to church and Sunday school, but that seems to have been out of the question. My Uncle Adam, who was next younger than Henry, and who was now living in the United States at Preston, Minnesota, made a visit to Canada about this time; and when he returned he took my father with him. From this time on my father earned his own living either by working for his brothers or some of their neighbors during the summer, and in the winter time he worked in the pine woods in Minnesota.

    p.11 My father was working for his brother Peter when he met Emetine Krause, to whom he was married February 18, 1874. The Krause farm joined the Peter Zimmerman farm on the east.

    The PHILIP
    ZIMMERMAN Obituary

    Philip Zimmerman,
    the youngest of seven
    children, was born in
    Ontario, Canada, January
    10, 1851. His father,
    Christian Zimmerman,
    died when Philip was
    five months old. At the
    age of 14 it was
    necessary for the boy to
    earn his own living, and
    he found employment on
    the farm of a kindly
    Scotchman, Robert
    Murray, at ten dollars a
    month. An older brother
    had earlier left for
    Minnesota and Philip
    followed him. Philip's
    first job was working for
    Dr. Von Lochen of
    Preston driving the
    doctor's team and caring
    for them. The following
    winter, at the age of
    sixteen, he joined a crew
    of lumberjacks in the
    pine woods along the
    Mississippi.
    In 1874 he married
    Ernestine Krause of
    Racine. They made their
    home near Fairmont,
    Minnesota. For two
    successive years a plague
    of grasshoppers
    destroyed their entire
    crop, so they abandoned
    their farm and returned to
    Spring Valley.
    They settled on what is
    known as the Zimmerman
    Homestead, the farm 3½
    miles northwest of Spring
    Valley, where Mr. and Mrs.
    Jack Briggs have been
    living. Philip placed his
    building on a hill above
    Deer Creek, close to a large
    spring which served for
    years as a refrigerator.
    As the children grew old
    enough to help with the
    work, more land was
    acquired until the original
    160 became 360 acres. For
    the Zimmerman's and their
    seven children this was the
    good life known by the
    early settlers of our
    community. They "broke"
    (cleared) the land, planted
    crops, raised chickens and
    stock. They slept on cornhusk
    mattresses in summer
    and feather beds in winter.
    They canned from two to
    four hundred quarts of fruit
    yearly and made twenty
    gallons of sauerkraut. They
    boarded the crew of "Irish
    paddies" who laid the track
    for the Great Western
    railroad across their farm
    and built the high trestle.
    There were picnics in the
    "Jensen woods" and on the
    winter evenings, visiting
    back and forth with their
    good neighbors, the Thayers, the
    Hesses, and the Churchills. In
    winters with the sleigh, in summer
    with the "surrey with the fringe on
    top," they drove every Sunday to the
    first Methodist Church of Spring
    Valley.
    In 1924, friends and neighbors
    celebrated the golden wedding
    anniversary of the Zimmerman's.
    Mrs. Zimmerman passed away in
    1926, but Mr. Zimmerman reached
    the age of 90, passing away in 1941.
    Of the seven children three are
    living, Annie, Alice, and Fern. In
    1905 Annie, the oldest child married
    a Methodist minister Fred Nelson.
    They are now retired and live in Los
    Altos, California. In 1899, Julius
    left for western Montana and
    worked with the sheep-herders and
    cattlemen, an era of the early west
    known today as "cowboy days."
    In 1906, Albert married Anna
    Thompson and farmed in the
    Buckwheat Ridge community,
    retiring to Spring Valley in 1946.
    Edward married Tressie Tabor in
    1913 and took over the old home
    form, for his father retired that year
    and moved to the northeast part of
    Spring Valley. Minnie first taught
    high school, then did graduate work
    and became the librarian at Winona
    State Teachers College. Alice and
    Fern taught for twenty years in
    Cloquet High School, Minnesota.
    They now make their home with a
    92-year old uncle, Julius Krause, in
    Santa Ana, California.

    Chap.3; p. 11
    "(My father Philip Zimmerman had) a very quiet lovable disposition. I cannot remember of ever seeing him angry. He always displays that quiet even temperament under all circumstances and would rather take a little abuse than quarrel with anyone. He has always been very fond of his children and when they were small played with them a great deal. When they were big enough to help him he tried to make work easy by telling stories or experiences that he had had. He was a very good story teller, and like his mother has an exceptional instinct for analyzing end understanding human nature. I have often been surprised how well he could judge the character of people whom he did not know just by talking with them a few moments, and he seldom he judged wrong. He always made his living by working on a farm, but would like to have had a chance to study medicine. He did spend one winter studying with a doctor, but there was no opportunity for him to continue with such a course."

    [Philip at school in Canada; Philip coming to MN; Philip's obituary; Philips personality]

  64. Ibid., My Family pp. 1-7.

    Chapter 3 MY PARENTS Page 1 MY PARENTS
    My parents, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Zimmerman met for the first time at the home of my father's brother, Peter Zimmerman, one summer when they were both helping him harvest his crop. She was 18 and he nearly two years older. The Peter Zimmerman farm joined my grandfather Krause's farm on the west and it was the custom for neighbors to help each other during the harvest time. The grain was all bound by hand in those days, and my mother had had lots of experience in out-of-door work, so she was an excellent hand at binding sheaves. Four years later, February 18, 1874, they were married. They celebrated their Golden Wedding at their home in Spring Valley, Minnesota, February 18, 1924. At the time when they were married there was no church in the community, so they were married in the Middle Branch School House, which still stands, and still serves as a public school building. My mother's girl friend, Lisa Gahringer, was ready to marry a young man by the name of Warner about the same time, so arrangements were made for a double wedding. Rev. Hilcher of the German Evangelical Church officiated. The little school house was well filled and the wedding was a happy affair. As long as my mother lived at home with her parents she had to be her father?s hired man, doing all kinds of hard work outside, which was not usually done by women. She had to help haul rock for making the foundations of the farm buildings, and as there were quite a number of these, and the foundations were large and high, rock hauling became a task which seemed to have no end. There was a house, a barn, a granary, a wood shed, a stone millhouse, and numerous other smaller buildings. Then too, there was wood to haul and cut, and manure to haul and spread, and of course, the regular work of the farm was always crowding on, such as the seeding, harvesting, thrashing, plowing, corn husking, and all the many other tasks that had to be done on the farm. With all this kind of work she had to help. It seemed that grandfather would never do a thing without taking her along. There was always lots of hard work, and never any time for pleasure, or doing the things that one liked to do. Vacations were unheard of in those days. My mother was very fond of all kinds of fancywork and sewing. Quilt piecing was quite a craze at that time, but there was never any time for anything like that in my grandfather's home. I have heard my mother tell of trying to piece quilt patches after she was supposed to be in bed. It was too bad that she could not have had an opportunity to do some of the things she 1iked to do, and that girls should have the opportunity of doing. She says she was glad to marry as it meant an opportunity for her to do as she liked and a measure of' freedom from a hard life.
    After the wedding my parents went to Martin County in western Minnesota to live. Here they bought a 160 acre farm. It was a piece of prairie land with no buildings on it, and lay a mile or so to the east or northeast of my father's sister?s farm, known as the old Hopp place. A few miles to the southwest there was an 80 acre homestead for sale. It had a little house on it and as my parents needed a house right away, and land was quite cheap, they decided to buy this 80 acre place a1so. This little house became their first home, and is the house in which I was born. The little house was almost square with the front door near the southeast corner, and a wooden step at the entrance. On the side opposite to the front door was a chimney and back door which opened into a 1ittle shed where one could store fuel, and it also served to keep the northwest winds from blowing the snow in during the winter. The house had just one main room in it. In the northeast corner was a narrow stairway leading to an attic. The floor had a trap door leading into a cellar, which was just a dug-out place under the house. My father dug out enough to make a cellar and then he boarded it up with two by six inch planks.
    In 1930, when I visited my father, we drove up to Martin Co. to see the little house. It was about one hundred miles straight west from the place where my father now lives. We found the little house in very good condition and inhabited. The place was owned by wealthy land owners of Welcome, and
    renters were living on it. The little shed on the west side had been made into a kitchen, but otherwise very little change had been made. The cellar was still walled up with the two by six inch plank which my father had put in nearly fifty years before. The narrow little stairway for going up into the attic was still there, and the windows and doors were the same. How glad I am to have had this opportunity of seeing the house, because in February 1932, less than two years after we visited it, it burned down and its burning created considerable sensation because it probably was the oldest or at least one of the oldest houses in the country. The following clipping came out in the Welcome paper:
    House Burns on Jarchow Farm
    “The residence on the old Jarchow farm, four and a half miles north of Welcome, was destroyed by fire early today. Loss was estimated at $1,200. Alfred Goerndt, the tenant was at St. Paul with a load of hogs at the time of the fire. The origin had not been determined today. The farm, consisting of 120 acres, is owned by the Welcome Investment Company. It was once operated by Henry Wohlenhaus. The house was a small structure built many years ago.” The house stood on the northeast corner of the homestead. A couple of rods to the northeast of it my father had built stables for his cattle, and even today the weeds grow rank there showing where the stables once stood. The homestead was about twenty miles west of Winnebago, which was then the most important village in that country, and about eight miles northwest of the present town of Fairmont and three or four miles north of the present town of Welcome. The place is on the left side of the present highway, as you drive out to the north of Welcome, and a mile or more to the south of Elm Creek. Elm Creek was a small stream in those days, except in the spring of the year. It flowed through low marshy land to the east. A mile or two east of the homestead the marsh land looked like a great lake in the spring of the year. As one looks over the farms on which my father was starting his married life, the arrangement does not seem very convenient or encouraging, but no doubt it he had stayed there he would have bought and sold unti1 he succeeded in having his land all in one place. One day my father was returning from his sister?s place, and as he was crossing the Elm Creek Flat he noticed a great many silver poplar shoots just out of the ground, perhaps five or six inches high. He reached down and pulled up about four by the roots and took them home. When my mother saw them she was delighted, and taking her spade she planted them in a row south of the house. They grew, and today they stand there, tall, stately, and beautiful, as monuments to her efforts. She also planted several rows of willows on the north side of the place, some of the stumps and shoots of which are still there. It was customary to plant trees on the north side of the house and barns because it afforded a shelter and protection from the winter storms. The country is level with frequent little lakes or low lands, and no timber anywhere. Consequently everyone planted a few trees near his home, and today wherever there is a home it is surrounded by a few hand-planted trees.
    About a quarter of a mile from the little house where my parents started housekeeping lived their nearest neighbor, a family by the name of Schwartz; and about a mile and a half to the northeast lived my father's sister, Mrs. George Hopp. (Katherine Zimmerman Hopp) The grasshoppers had eaten up the people?s entire crop the year before my parents moved to Martin County. No one could remember of such a thing ever happening before.
    Their coming was a mystery. People could not understand where they came from or where they went. My father, like the rest of the farmers there, had faith in the country and sowed the seed again and tilled the soil hoping for a crop. The grasshoppers had left early in the fall, but before they 1eft, they had laid their eggs, and when the warm weather came the following spring there seemed to be millions of baby hoppers every where, who devoured every green thing. Even the leaves of the trees and bushes were not left unmolested. The only green plants not entirely destroyed were the garden-pea vines. It would not be possible to describe the desolation that they left behind. For weeks the people had not one green thing to eat. In those days there were no canned vegetables or fruit. Everyone craved food of this kind, and it was not to be had. This was the summer before I was born. My mother said that she had an unnatural appetite for vegetables, but there seemed to be no way to supply this much needed food. Then one day a letter came from Grandpa Krause saying that he was sending a wagonload of cabbage and rutabaga. My father drove in a lumber wagon to Winnebago, a distance of twenty miles to get these supplies. Mother said she could hardly wait for him to return. When he reached the railroad station and inquired about his supplies he was told that they were there, but when the depot agent went to get them they could not be found. Somebody had stolen them. Father hated to go back home with the wagon empty. He knew mother would be terribly disappointed, but there was nothing else to do. When she found out the truth she wept as if her heart would break. Pioneer life was never easy, but this was almost beyond endurance. When the crop was all devoured the grasshoppers left. People then had great hopes for a crop the coming year, because the grasshoppers left without laying their eggs. The following spring everybody put in another crop. How beautiful the fields looked, and what a wonderful harvest was promised! Then, suddenly one noticed the sky to the southwest getting dark and at first thought that a storm was gathering. Then suddenly, as the first few dropped down on the fields people realized what was happening. It seemed as if there were millions and millions of them. For several days they darkened the light of the sun; and again they ate the entire crop. Not a blade of grass or green thing was left. This made the third crop that had been destroyed by them. We know now that they visited the greater part of the central Western States, and that the crops in all these states were devoured in the same manner. People became discouraged. They had nothing to eat and no money to buy with. Where were they to get the seed to sow another crop? And if they did so would the grasshoppers appear again? Such were the questions that people were asking themselves everywhere. The price of land dropped to almost nothing. My father who had had six or seven hundred dollars to start with now had nothing. My parents decided to sell what they could and come back to grandpa Krause's place and help in the harvest fields. The grasshoppers did not molest that part of the state. It seemed that they visited only the prairie sections. I was a baby then, not a year old, and my aunt Anna, who was visiting us took me back to southeastern Minnesota to my grandparent„s. My father and mother followed soon afterward. They drove down in a wagon, and mother says that it was a hard experience because there were so few places where one could stay over night. Before sundown they were tired of driving and wanted to stop for the night, but as they could find no place to stay, kept on driving. Houses were long stretches apart. Finally when it was nearly eleven o'clock at night, they saw a little light in the distance and drove toward it. When they reached it and inquired if they might stay there until morning the lady hesitatingly refused. Mother was just too weary to go on, and as she spoke to my father, the lady of the house heard her voice, so she called out into the darkness and said “If you have a lady with you I will be glad to have you stay. I thought there were two men, but I would not send a lady on.” “Come and stay.” How glad they were to stay, and how grateful my mother was to her ever after. She told my parents that her husband was away, and that she was afraid to have strangers stay unless there was a lady with them.
    My parents spent the rest of the summer working in the harvest field. When there was no more work to do my father went back to Martin County and traded the homestead for a team of' horses, and sold the farm for seventy-five dollars. After having disposed of what few things he had, he hitched his horses to a wagon and returned to my grandpa Krause?s place, where my parents spent the winter. The next spring they bought a one-hundred-and-sixty acre homestead for twelve and one-half dollars per acre. This is the place where my brother Edward now lives. They broke up some of the land where there was no timber, cleared off the trees from another portion, and at the end of one year they raised two thousand bushels of wheat from sixty-eight acres, and sold it for one dollar per bushel. That made it possible for them to pay for one-half of their land in one year. They never again had such a crop. After that first year the chintz bugs bothered the crops for several years, then there were a number of years of drought, and then prices were not very good, and so something always interfered; but each year they always made their living and a little bit more. By raising horses, cattle, and hogs, there was always something that could be turned into money at the end of the year, even if the crops were not very good. As far as we know my father was the first person who ever owned this farm and lived on it, though it had been a homestead.
    When he bought it there were many beautiful springs on it, especially along the central valley running through the place from north to south. The largest springs were close to Deer Creek. On the bank below, where my Brother Edward's barn now stands, were the remains of' an old hut where someone, probably Mike Duffy, had lived for a time without owning the land. Deer Creek was a large stream in those days with an abundance of good fish in it. We seldom crossed it in the early days. The vegetation along Deer Creek and near the springs close to Deer Creek was so thick that one could hardly walk through it. Wild plums, wild grapes, choke cherries, wild gooseberries, wild currants, black haws, hop vines, wild cherries, and wild crabapples were to be found in great abundance. There were lots of black walnuts and butternuts, and hazel brush grew just everywhere. Among the thick vegetation one could find numberless varieties of shrubs, flowers, and trees. The stately beautiful elm, the box-elder, the basswood, ironwood, black walnut, butternut, and several varieties of oak were a few of the most common trees to be found there in those days. Wild flowers grew just as if there were one immense flower garden which extended everywhere. I have never 1ived anywhere where one could find such a great variety of flowers. Among the most common were the columbine or honeysuckle, the lady slipper, both yellow and purple, the goldenrod, the red lily, 1ack-in-the-pulpit, the fire ball, blood root, star of Bethlehem, wild cucumber, several kinds of violets and daisies, also buttercups and cowslips, and hundreds of others which I cannot now mention. No matter where yon looked along the roadside pretty faces of flowers were always there to greet you. Before the snow was completely gone the crocuses began to appear, and different kinds of flowers kept coming on all summer, and when the snow came in the fall it would seem that nature was not half through blooming, and was trying to crowd a great surplus of blossoms into the last of the season before snowy weather came on. Wild animals common in those days were the timber wolf, a small grey wolf something like a coyote only larger, the cottontail rabbit; the badger, striped gopher, and a few other small animals. We also bad rattlesnakes in the early days, but I never saw one because they were soon killed off. The prairie chicken and mourning dove were there in great abundance. Their call used to fill me with wonderment. I once found a prairie chicken's nest on my way home from school, in which there were seventeen eggs. How surprised I was at the big nest full of eggs, and how the old mother hen was fluttering around to detract my attention from the nest. There was a great variety of birds; more than in any other place in which I have lived. The robin stayed with us all summer, also the cat bird, the finch, and many others that I cannot now mention. We also had the chicken hawk and the crow. How little a place all these birds played in our life, then, but now they seem so important, as one thinks back to childhood days.
    In the spring of the year, and any time during the summer when there were heavy rains Deer Creek
    would overflow, and water would back up into the slough on my father's place. At such times the slough had quite a sufficiency of water of its own. The result was exciting for us. How the water would roar, and thunder, and carry on sometimes for several days. At such times the entire flat across Deer Creek would be under water and part of the Duffy Flat also. In those early days the land across Deer Creek was not pastured but was one great mass and tangle of wild vegetation so thick one could not walk in it without difficulty. Very well do I remember the many and sometimes almost hideous noises that emerged from those woods at night. Scarcely was the sun down when the night hawk made his appearance with his peculiar swishing cry; a little bit later came the call of the whip-poor-will. I used to wonder what kind of a bird he was, and why he never got tired, and why he was not afraid to make so much noise in those lonely woods. The bull frog too, added his hideous croaking during a part of the year, and could be heard ever so far. One might think that he was a tremendous fellow by the amount of noise he could make. The fireflies used to appear in great numbers, and on a dark night were very interesting. They never made any noise but were just appearing everywhere. You could never see them but their lights might appear in your hair or at your hands or feet. It was great fun to try to see them or follow them by their lights. In the fall and winter we always heard the howling of the wolves that seemed to come there for some reason. These woods always had a fascination for me, and I learned to love all these noises, even the howling of the wolves. Now I often wish that I could hear all these sounds over again. What a wild, beautiful music it would be. One often does not appreciate fully the wonderful grandeur of nature until one is without it for a while. In later years cattle were pastured here and destroyed the beautiful wildness. But even then; the water, the banks with their trees and shrubs hanging over the water's edge, and the big stately trees were always inspiring. This home of my childhood certainly was a beautiful spot, beautiful beyond description in those early days before all the natural wildness was destroyed. While my father was in the land office making arrangements to buy this piece of land another man came in to buy the same place. My father had beaten him by less than an hour. Many times since, we have rejoiced that he was not an hour later on that memorable day. My father kept adding to his farm until he had four hundred acres, which was almost more than he could manage, but he wanted sufficient land to keep his boys busy and with their help he handled it quite nicely.
    The house that my father built on this place was a rectangular building a story-and-a-half or two stories high. The upper story was not plastered for a number of years. The downstairs had one large room which was used for kitchen, dining room, and living room. There was also a pantry and bedroom where my parents slept. I slept in a trundle bed while I was real small. During the day this was shoved, under my parents' bed, and when it was bedtime it was rolled out and used. As soon as we were no longer babies we slept in wooden beds upstairs between feather beds in winter time. How lovely and warm these kept us in spite of the fact that the room was quite cold. In the summer time we slept under quilted quilts. For some reason my mother abandoned the idea of father beds altogether except while we were small children. The mattresses were home made. Bed ticking was sewed up leaving a slit in the center of the top; then the mattress was filled with corn husks. This had to be stirred and leveled every day. Making beds was not so easy a task as nowadays. The house was built on a hill or knoll less than a quarter of a mile from the spring. For a few years we carried all our water from the spring. Then came a season of years with a continual program of building and improving until we had stables for horses and cows, a granary, corn cribs, a barn, two wells, sheep sheds, chicken house, hog house, machine shed, and the house itself had to be added to several times; and finally when I was a young lady my folks rebuilt it completely, making a lovely big modern house of thirteen or fourteen rooms. What is now the front room of Brother Edward's house was the kitchen and living room of the old rectangular house. His front bedroom was the bedroom where my parents slept and where my trundle bed was kept. What is now the
    cellar hall was our pantry in the old house. The north half of what is now Edward's front porch was an enclosed summer kitchen and porch and woodshed. Many a time I have stood by that east window and looked out toward Mt. Tom and watched the wind blow the snow over the fields, longing to go out and play; but mother would so often say “It is too cold today, you had better not go out.” and the following day the snow would still be blowing; in fact many of the winter days were too cold and stormy for playing outside. While we were children our sport in winter time was sliding down hill on sleds, or making snow men, or snow houses, and in the summer time we played along the springs and creeks picking flowers or gathering pretty stones, or building little dams, or playing in the sand. But usually there were so many chores to do that when we were through with these we were glad to come to the house with the grownups. I remember one spring an unusual thing happened. A great abundance of warm rain came with the spring thaw. The result was a flood. The ice was lifted out of the creek bed for some distance up the stream, broken up into curious shapes, and carried and piled all over the Duffy Flat and our slough in tremendous heaps. Some piles projected up as high as a house, making the most wonderful display of ice that I have ever seen. It was a grand sight, and it took several weeks for all this ice to melt. It gave us unusual sport for a while. For a. number of years we raised our own sugar cane and had it made into sorghum. Cane was planted and cared for like corn, and while it was growing looked very much like a corn field. When it was ready to harvest the leaves were stripped off the stalks, then it was cut off near the ground and tied into bundles. These bundles we hauled to our neighbor, a Mr. Felch, who knew how to make sorghum. He had two rollers with a large square container underneath them. These rollers were made to turn by a horse pulling on a switch-pole to which he was hitched, and slowly he walked around in a circle. The switch-pole kept the rollers going. The cane was put between the rollers and the raw juice ran into the big square container below. The cane juice had to be boiled and skimmed several times until there was produced the thick golden-brown sorghum. The sorghum was put into barrels or kegs with faucets on them and put into the cellar or granary. Woe to the little youngster who turned on the faucet of the sorghum barrel and neglected to turn it off properly; because under such circumstances the sorghum would run down on the cellar floor, and not only be wasted but badly stick up the dirt floor of the cellar. We always used kerosene lanterns to work about the place after dark in those days, and if we drove anywhere on a dark night someone had to hold the lantern to try to light the way. In the house we used kerosene lamps. I remember the candle, but it was not in common use in those days. It had been replaced by the kerosene lamp. My grandparents had several molds for making candles but they hung in the cellar-way unused. Keeping the lantern and lamp globes clean was quite a task. No matter how careful one might be there was always danger of breaking them either while you were washing them, or if they were not properly rinsed they might break when the lamp was lighted. These globes had to be washed every day. Another task that was very tiresome was washing milk pails. They were made of wood and had to be scrubbed every day. The idea was to keep them white. When the first tin pails were used we thought it was a wonderful improvement over the old wooden pails. Wooden wash tubs too, were replaced by galvanized ones. That too was a great help because the wooden tubs would often have to stand with water in them for a few hours to swell them before they were ready to use.
    But pioneer days always come to an end and so it was here. The country was soon settled up. Woods were cut down and the land cleared for crops. Roads and bridges were built. Little schoolhouses and churches dotted the country everywhere. And as the younger children of the family came to their teens they knew little or nothing about the early days except what was told them. When my parents were
    first married they always used a wagon to get from place to place; but by the time I was eight or nine years old we always had a nice buggy. I remember one of the last of these buggies had a top with a fringe around it. We thought it was very beautiful. About this time instead of the large working horses we had one team of 1ighter weight horses for the buggy. We also had a single carriage for one horse. In winter time we had a cutter and sleigh bells when we did not want to use the bob sled. I remember well the first automobile that came into the country. I was a young lady then. All horses were afraid of it. When the owner met anyone he had to drive to the side of the road and stop until the team of horses had passed, because it was so easy to

  65. Ibid., p.40.
  66. Philip Zimmerman Family Bible.
  67. Pfarrer Walter of Altheim to Rolland Zimmerman, History of the Zimmerman Family in Altheim (written in conjunction with Rolland Zimmerman's visit to Altheim in October of 1983 ).
Surnames | Index

Revised: November 26, 2016