Husband: John Jacob Wintermantel (1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10)
Born: 28 Aug 1799 in Ihringen, Breisach, Grand Duchy of Baden (Germany) (11)
Married: 19 Feb 1822 in Ihringen, Breisach, Grand Duchy of Baden (now Germany) (104)
Died: 23 Dec 1879 in Sauk Co., Wisconsin (13)
Father: Johann Jakob Wintermantel
Mother: Cathrina Muller
Spouses:
Wife: Salome Stalbar Walter (15 16 17 18 19)
Born: 01 Mar 1800 in Ihringen, Germany (20 21)
Died: 30 Jun 1883 in Sauk Co, Wisconsin (22)
Father:
Mother:
Spouses:
Children
01 (F): Salome Wintermantle (24 25 26 27)
Born: 25 Jan 1823 in Ihringen, Baden, Germany
Died: 17 Mar 1904 in Sauk City, Sauk, WI
Spouses: Mathias Schmiedlin
02 (M): John Jacob Wintermantel (28 29 30 31 32 33)
Born: 18 Feb 1825 in Ihringen, Germany (34)
Died: 1894 in Iowa (35)
Spouses: Carolina Schoepflin; Eliza A. Jaquiss
03 (M): George Frederich Wintermantle (36 37)
Born: 20 Mar 1827 in Ihringen, Germany
Died: 1847 in Louisville, Jefferson, Kentucky
Spouses:
04 (F): Anne Marie Wintermantel (38 39 40)
Born: 26 Dec 1829 in Ihringen, Germany (41)
Died: about 1870 (42)
Spouses: Rudolf Jaeger
05 (M): George Jacob Wintermantel (43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53)
Born: 27 Feb 1832 in Ihringen, Germany (54 55)
Died: 17 Oct 1916 in Troy, Sauk, Wisconsin (56)
Spouses: Agnes Joos
06 (M): John George Wintermantel (57 58 59 60 61 62 63)
Born: 07 Dec 1835 in Ihringen, Baden, Germany (64 65)
Died: 23 Feb 1920 in Sauk Co., Wisconsin (66)
Spouses: Charlotte Rose; Anna Kindschi
07 (M): William Frederick Wintermantle (67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77)
Born: 27 Apr 1838 in Ihringen, Germany (78 79)
Died: 21 Jan 1927 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon (80)
Spouses: Sarah Ann Dengel
08 (F): Rosina Wintermantel (81 82 83 84 85)
Born: 06 Nov 1840 in Ihringen, Freiburg, Baden, Germany (86)
Died: 24 Jan 1923 in Leola, McPherson, South Dakota
Spouses: Paulus Heitz
09 (M): Christian Wintermantel (87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102)
Born: 03 Oct 1842 in Ihringen, Breisach, Grand Duchy of Baden (Germany)
Died: 19 Jan 1897 in Canby, Clackamas, OR (103)
Spouses: Matilda Ella Fey
Additional Information

John Jacob Wintermantel:

Christened: 29 Aug 1799, Evangelisch Church, Ihringen, Freiburg, Baden 12

Buried: Black Hawk Cemetery, Troy Twsp, Sauk Co, WI 14

Notes:

Immigrated May 1854 ship Bremen

Per L. Brown, 25 Apr 2010, " (Her mother) She didn't remember much more than that, other than my grandmother (Amelia Ella Wintermantel) had said that her grandfather was a Burgermeister of Berlin."
I (DZS) believe this refers to John Jacob Wintermantel. The traditional story I got from my grandmother is that he was the Burgermeister of a small town in Germany, probably Ihringen, not Berlin.

The Wintermantel Story - Beginnings

17 August 2013

Dear Children,

My father's mother was a Wintermantel. Tonight I will tell you about her branch of the family.
Wintermantel means winter coat in German.

The Wintermantels came from a part of Germany in the southern province of Baden-Württemberg. They lived in a little village called Ihringen which is about five miles northwest of Freiburg. Freiburg sits on the western edge of the Black Forest, so Ihringen is very near to it also. The Black Forest is a 3500 square mile area, almost rectangular area of mountains and forests. The Danube River originates in the Black Forest and the Rhine River Valley falls away to the west. The area is famous for its clock-making industry, especially cuckoo clocks, and also for the wood carving that adorns them. It has 14,000 miles of hiking, biking and skiing trails. The most interesting thing I learned about the Black Forest is it's inhabited by a species of giant earth worms called Lumbricus badensis. I wouldn't want to meet one on a dark and stormy night, would you? I imagine our Wintermantels were much too busy with day to day living to enjoy the trails, but perhaps they knew Lumbricus.

And I'll bet they did climb on the Kaiserstuhl! This series of volcanic hills rises from the the Rhine Valley and the southern end of the Kaiserstuhl is right at Ihringen!. Kaiserstuhl means king's chair. It was so named because King Otto III held court there in the year 994. I seems like our Wintermantels lived in a lovely and historic part of Germany.

The first Wintermantel we know of is Georg Jacob Wintermantel (b. Ihringen, Baden 1746 – d.1795). He died before he reached 50. His wife was Barbara Jacob. She only lived 33 years, from 1753 – 1786. They had three children, the youngest only a year and a half when Barbara died. So then Georg Jacob married Catharina Hohweiler. They had three more children, the youngest being less than two when Georg Jacob died. (If you want to know the exact dates and places for any of these people go to my website at dianneandpaul.net or refer to the CD in this book) Who took care of all these siblings after Georg Jacob and Barbara were gone? We don't know. We don't know how long Catharina lived. But our ancestor Johann Jacob would have been 23 when his father and mother were both gone. He had two younger siblings and three younger half siblings to worry about. Hopefully, there were many aunts and uncles around to help out. So here is the next generation:

Johann Jacob Wintermantel (b. Ihringen 1773 – d. Ihringen 1805) - He only lived to the age of 33. He married Catharina Mueller in 1795 and they had four children, the youngest six months old and then Johann Jacob died in 1805. We don't know how long Catharina lived or when she was born. Our ancestor, the second of these four children was only six when his father died. And that was:


Another Johann Jacob Wintermantel (b. 1799 in Ihringen, Baden – d. 1879 Sauk County, Wisconsin), one of our two immigrant Wintermantel ancestors. We know about his birth because the Wintermantel researcher, J. E., went to Ihringen and brought back a copy of the church record. Here it is translated to English:

1799

Johann Jakob Wintermantel

The 28th of August between 10 and 11 p.m., born, and the 29th of the same (August) christened

father: Johann Jakob Wintermantel
citizen here.
Mother: Catharina nee Muller.

Christening Witnesses:
1. Jakob Walther, citizen and caregiver here
2. Wilhelm Muller, single here.
3. Salome Birmelin, single here.
4. Anna Maria nee Muller, wife of Johannes Mossner, citizen here.

In 1822 he married Salome Stalbar Walter (b. 1800, Ihringen – d. 1883 Sauk Co., Wi). Johann Jacob was a farmer, and according to my grandmother, Minnie, he was the “Bürgermeister” or mayor, of “a small village in Germany.” That must have been Ihringen, as that's where he, his wife and all his children were born and lived until they came to America. However, the only time I ever heard or read that fact was when my grandmother told it to me. I don't know that there is any way to verify it.

Here is another story of the Wintermantel family in Germany. This one comes from a great-grandson of Johann Jacob (b. 1799), Elbert Wardle, who did research on the Wintermantles before the age of computers:

"The Wintermantel Family
The Wintermantel family originated in Switzerland from around the late 1300's and were of the Aristocracy. Those we have record of were from the Freiburg area of Germany in the province of Baden Wurtemberg.

According to Paul Wintermantel, sometime prior to the Thirty Years War, which began in 1618, there were three Wintermantel brothers. One remained in Switzerland while another journeyed to Austria and the third emigrated to the Baden Wurtemberg region of Germany. As far as we are able to determine, all Wintermantels originating out of Germany are descendants of the brother who emigrated to Baden from Switzerland.

John Jacob Wintermantel lived close enough to the Alps that he could see them while herding the sheep and cattle. Like the Alsace region of France, the Baden area is wine growing country. John Jacob was a wine merchant, also. There are still many Wintermantels in the Baden area to this day. Most Wintermantels were peasants or farmers. Many were Lutheran although some were Roman Catholic as documented by old birth records.

Beginning with the Thirty Years War until Bismark consolidated the German states in 1871, there was civil strife and religious fighting between the Lutherans and Catholics throughout Germany. During the 1800's there was a mass migration of people to America, including John Jacob Wintermantel and his family about 1855.

The route followed by the family was by wagon to Chur, Switzerland. From Chur, the family crossed into France traveling northward to the Alsace Lorraine area where they worked in the vineyards for a while. They traveled along the Seine River to the vicinity of Paris and on to England where they boarded a ship to America for the three week crossing. At the time this trip was made, it was more than likely a clipper ship. After reaching New York, John Jacob Wintermantel's family settled in Wisconsin at Prairie du Sac."

Another researcher I'll refer to as 'J.E.' has uncovered evidence that questions Elbert's version. Some think the description of the view from Ihringen and of the journey out of the country to America, was perhaps copied from another Wintermantel source that lived elsewhere. Following is what J. E. had to say about this issue:

"OK, so it looks like a consensus on the Chur journey being incorrect. And as far as being able to see the Alps from Ihringen, here is a reply from Werner Schmidlin, a Schmiedlin cousin, who was born and raised in Bischoffingen (next to Ihringen), and now lives in Australia, so he would know for sure.
'To your question could one see the Alps from Bischoffingen or Ihringen?
The answer is no. If you look behind you in Ihringen or Bischoffingen (He means north) you see the hills of the Kaiserstuhl. If you look west, you see the Vogue Mountains in France. If you go on top of the Hills on the Kaiserstuhl and look east, you see part of the Black Forrest. If you look towards Basel (south), about 50 Km away you do not see the Alps as the northern part of Switzerland is fairly flat or slightly undulated and the Alps are a fair way back.'”

The part about Johann Jacob (1799) being a wine merchant, though, is very interesting and adds to our portrait of him.

Johann Jacob (1799) and Salome (1800) had nine children in Ihringen. In 1856 they decided to come to America. Their two eldest sons, John Jacob (1825) and George Frederick (1827) had already come. We don't know for sure why they decided to leave their homeland. We do know that many other Germans were coming to America at that time. According to the story my grandmother told me, and the same story I have found while researching others of our German ancestors, an important consideration was the matter of young men being conscripted into the German army and then being rented out as Hessians to fight in other people's wars. According to my grandmother, Minnie Wintermantel, the sons, John Jacob (1825) and George Frederick (1827), wanted to avoid that fate so they slipped away to the coast and caught a boat for America.

More information about John Jacob (1799) comes from the Wintermantel passport for the family when they left for America in 1856:


Passport No. 38 Hemisphere
No. 11413 Purpose: To travel to America
Canton Baden
Oberheim Section Passpot Bureau Breisach

Description:
age - 55 years
Height - 5 ft 9 in
stature - slim
face - longish, healthy
hair - brown
Forehead - high
eyebrows - brown
eyes - blue
nose - pointed
mouth - middlesized
beard - small beard in cheeks
chin - round
distinguishing marks - none
Personal affairs - married

Signature - Jacob Wintermantel

All native and foreign civil and military authorities are requested to let the holder of this passport -
Jacob Wintrmantel
and his wife, Salome Walter
and their six children -
Anna Maria - 26
George Jacob - 24
John George - 24
William - 17
Rosina - 15
Christian - 13
born in Ihringen, residing in Ihringen, who wish to travel to North America in order to settle there, travel free and without hindrance, also providing protection and help if needed. This pass was issued upon proper payment in triplicate, 9 April 1856.
Witnessed by Gortsch - Passport Bureau."
(translated by Meta Fashing.)











Our source, J. E., provides us a timeline for the family coming to America:

"1846 - 1847 The 2 oldest Wintermantel sons, JOHN Jacob and George FREDERICH, traveled to America, together or separately. (And 3 Gugel sons came as well--Jacob in 1846, John in 1851, and George in 1854.)

1847 Frederich Wintermantel died in Louisville, Kentucky.

9 April 1856 The remaining members of the Wintermantel family (except the married daughter Salome and her husband Mathias Schmiedlin, and children, who remained in Germany...), were issued a passport at Breisach, Baden, Germany, near Ihringen.

24 April 1856 John Jacob Wintermantel, his wife, Salome (Walter), and children -- Anna Maria, George JACOB, John GEORGE, Wilhelm (WILLIAM) Frederick, Rosina and Christian, left Ihringen. Also, Jacob and Catherine Gugel's remaining family left Ihringen on the same day, with the following remaining children -- William, Christian, Kate, Barbara and Sarah. The oldest daughter, Anna May Gugel and her husband, George Wintermantle, a cousin of our Wintermantels, remained in Ihringen until 1857.
The Wintermantel and Gugel families arrived in Kehl, Baden, by train that evening, and stayed there overnight.

25 April 1856 The families crossed the Rhine River and went to Strasburg, Alsace, France, and later that evening started for Paris.

26 April 1856 The families arrived in Paris, and that night the journey was resumed for le Havre, France.

27 April 1856 In the morning, the families arrived in le Havre, and spent several days there.

30 April 1856 In the evening the families boarded the sailboat "Hemisphere".

1 May 1856 In the morning the ship Hemisphere started for America.

7 June 1856 After a voyage of 37 days, the Hemisphere arrived in New York. Jacob Gugel had been ill before the voyage, but it was hoped the trip would improve his health. Instead, "he was taken to the hospital shortly after arriving in New York, where he died of palsy and a complication of diseases, at the age of 68 years, and was buried on Staten Island". (The rest of the Gugel family settled in Cass County, Indiana where the oldest Gugel son, Jacob, had been given a land grant for his service in the Mexican War.)

18 June 1856 The Wintermantels arrived in Little Prairie, Wisconsin.”

The Gugels mentioned above were also from Ihringen. Jacob, John or George Gugel may have been part of the group that my grandmother told me “ran off to the coast one night when they heard the army conscriptors were coming, and left for America.” The rest of the Gugel family came over the ocean aboard the Hemisphere with the rest of the Wintermantel family. There was intermarriage between the two families.

Doris Listscher Gasser, a Wintermantel descendant who still lives in Sauk County, wrote the following about the family's first home in America:

"The Wintermantels purchased a farm in Irish Valley and built a home. They sold the farm to Martin Yanke in 1907 and his descendants continue to live there. The house was in the path of the same tornado that destroyed the Catholic Church in Plain in 1918."

The 1860 census shows Jacob (1799) and Salome liivng there with five of their children. The 1870 census shows them living with their daughter Salome and Matt Schmiedlin right next door to G Jacob (1832) and his family. Neighbors Walsh (Welch), Howlet, Yaeger, and Hauser (Heiser) are the same or similar in both censuses, so I believe it to be the same farm. By 1870 G Jacob and George (1835, the letterwriter) are the only two sons still in Sauk County. So it makes sense to assume the farm on which G Jacob (1832) riased his family, that was destroyed by the 1917 tornado, was the same farm that his father and mother, Jacob (1799) and Sally settled on when they came to Wisconsin.

After the family had lived here for nineteen years, their son George wrote a letter home to relatives in Germany and someone saved it, translated it and shared it with us. It tells a lot about the early days of the Wintermantel family in Sauk County, Wisconsin.

"January 31, 1875

Honey Creek, Sauk County, Wisconsin

Dear Relatives and Friends,

Since nearly 10 years have already passed since our emigration to America, and I have not entirely forgotten you who still live at my place of birth, I finally came to the thought to write again to you. Very likely, there are those of our relatives and acquaintances there who still think about us and would like to know how things are going with the Wintermantel family in America. This short report will give you some idea how we have fared.

After a wait of 2 days in New York we journeyed directly to Wisconsin and settled in Honey Creek, Sauk County, where we worked for the first few months for different farmers until August when our father moved a few miles farther and, in September, bought 40 acres of land for $1.00 an acre. Next spring we built a house on this land, and that is where the parents now live.

The first years father broke up 20 to 30 acres of land and with the help of Jacob and William planted a vineyard and fruit trees, so that the parents have a pretty nice home. Both are still living. Father is still well and strong for his age. Mother is somewhat frail, but still pretty well. They live in well-to- circumstances and know nothing of want, for their land has produced MANY A GOOD HARVEST of wheat, oats, corn, wine and different vegetables with which you are acquainted too.

The land was still pretty wild when we arrived. The first ones came to this region about 10 years earlier, most of them from Switzerland, others from North Germany and South Germany and from the Alsace, still others from the eastern and southern states. Until 1846, wild people and wild animals were the only inhabitants of this region. And some of the original inhabitants are still present...”

He goes on to tell about the various children and I will share those other parts soon. And then...

“On January 13th I received a letter from Brother Christian in Iowa in which he enclosed a letter from you which you sent to Christian Wintermantel in Iowa. Regarding this I wanted to write to you, and had a letter ready when I received 2 other letters from him, one was from you and one from my mother's oldest sister, Kathrina, very likely written by her daughter, Kathrina. The next morning I brought them to my parents and read them to them in the presence of their daughter, Salome, and the young Schmidlin. These 2 letters surprised us, and brought joy, but also sorrow. We blamed ourselves for great carelessness, that for such a long time we did not write to you, and if I should give the reason, I would not know what to say. After the letters were read, father gave me $10 which I was to send to my mother's oldest sister. But if she should not be living any more, one half of it shall go to Rosina, the other sister of my mother, but the other half to go to the oldest sister's daughter, Kathrina.

Now I could come to a close, but I cannot send empty paper to Germany. I will, therefore, write something about the price of land. Last spring a farm of 120 acres was sold in our neighborhood for $2,700. It is almost all level land, but perhaps 50 acres is usable, the other is woods. But the land is all fertile. Another farm of 200 acres, with 80 acres under plow was sold for $4,250. On it was a 2 story stone house which cost $1,200.

Now I shall also write something of the conditions of the state and church, but there isn't enough room. Finally, a hearty greeting from us all to you all. Next spring I want to write another letter, God willing. When you write again tell us how many gulden you received for the $10. Our address is,

George Wintermantel, Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin.".

You can read the entire letter in the section of this book called “Sources.”
John Jacob and Salome Walter Wintermantel are buried in Black Hawk Cemetery, Troy Township, Sauk Co, WI, along with many of their descendants.

Now I want to tell you a little about each of John Jacob and Salome Walter Wintermantel's nine children.

John Jacob and Salome Walter Wintermantel's first child was Salome Wintermantel (b. 1823 Ihringen, Baden – 1904 Sauk City, Wisconsin). Salome married Mathias Schmiedlin (b.1820 Ihringen – d. 1903 Sauk City, Wisconsin). They were married and had at least five children in Ihringen before they followed the rest of the Wintermantel family to Sauk County. Here is what brother George wrote about Salome and Matthias in his letter to Germany in 1875:

"M. Schmidlins live close by our parents. He had father's farm in rent for several years, but then they bought out an Irishman. The two older daughters are married. Several children were born in America, and several have died. The parents and the rest of the children are healthy and well."

They had about nine chidren, four of whom survived to adulthood. One, their daughter Salome Schmiedlin and her husband, Emmanuel Kirschner, had nine children also. Five of them died before the age of eight. During a two month period during the winter of 1880 three of their little boys died; Franz Kirschner, age 7, Herman Kirschner 5, and John Heinrich Kirschner, 3. Most likely a contagious disease like diphtheria swept through the community. We don't know for sure. Sad though this was there is also good news for Salome and Matt. Of their grandchildren who lived, many lived into their 80's and 90's, at least nine. And one granddaughter, Sara, lived to be 102. She was the daughter of Mary Magdalena Weber, Salome and Matt's first child. Sara Weber married Clint O. Belzer. Both Sarah and Clint lived past the 100 mark, Sara to 102, Clint to 103. They were married almost 80 years!

John Jacob and Salome Walter Wintermantel's second child was John Jacob Wintermantel (b. 1825 Ihringen, Baden – 1894 Iowa). John Jacob and his brother, George Frederich, had come to America before their parents and family in 1846 or 1847. When John Jacob (1799) and Salome arrived with their six children in Sauk County one of their first thoughts was to find the two older brothers and unite the family.

Brother George wrote the following about his brother John Jacob:

"Brother John Jacob was found by Brother William in Memphis in 1860 and they took the train to Wisconsin. He lived for several years with the parents. In 1865 he went to Iowa, bought land, married, sold the land again, moved farther west, bought other land at Winterset, Madison County, Iowa, where he now lives. He is a widower, but lives in well-to-do circumstances."

John Jacob (1825) married Caroline Schoepflin. She brought 5 children with her to the marriage. Caroline and John Jacob had two more children. When the youngest was only 2 Caroline died. Then John Jacob married Eliza Jacquiss and had Katherine Ethel Wintermantel who married Harry Woodford. Kate and Harry had eight children including twins. In 1919 during the great flu epidemic, Harry, just back from WWI, and the twins, Elmer and Eleanor, who were then 2 1/2, all died.

John Jacob and Salome Walter Wintermantel's third child was George Frederich Wintermantle ( 1827 Ihringen, Baden – 1847 Louisville, Ky) Sadly, George Frederick never made it to Wisconsin. Brother George writes (1875 letter to Germany):

"We never saw anything more of Brother Frederich. According to J. J. Angaben he died in 1847 in Louisville, Kentucky."

This comment has puzzled researchers. Who was J. J. Angaben?

One researcher, M. Jenstad, had the following insight (email 2009):

"I've always just figured he must have been some researcher someone used before I was actively involved in genealogy. I've tried looking for that surname.....can't find it ANYWHERE! Today I had a new thought......using Babelfish website I entered "angeben" as a German word, and it came back as the word, "indicate".
Could this possibly mean that "according to J. J. (meaning John Jacob Wintermantel 2nd, who came to America before his parents), angeben (meaning "indicated") he died in 1847....so it might read:
'According to J. J. (Wintermantel), he indicated he (George Frederick) died in 1847 in Louisville, Kentucky.' ...This would then probably mean that John Jacob W. (2nd) and George Friedrich W. had found each other in America."

John Jacob and Salome Walter Wintermantel's fourth child was Anne Marie Wintermantel (1829 Ihringen, Baden - 1870) Only lived to age 40. She married Rudolf Yaeger. They had one son, Fred. Fred's daughter, Lillian Yaeger, married James Callaway and they had 10 children in Wisconsin and Canada.

John Jacob and Salome Walter Wintermantel's fifth child was George Jacob Wintermantel (known as Jacob) (1832 Ihringen, Baden – 1916 Sauk Co, WI). Jacob was a shoemaker before the Civil War. He married Agnes Joos from Switzerland about 1860. Jacob and most of his descendants stayed in Wisconsin. And one of his descendants became a good friend of mine even before I knew she was a descendant! That may be why I have such a wealth of information about Jacob. I even have a wonderful story about how his wife's family came to America. You can find it all in “Sources.” In the meantime, I will condense some of it for you here.

Jacob and Agnes had three small children when he was drafted in October, 1864 and became part of Company H, Thirty-seventh Wisconsin Infantry. He fought with Ninth Army Corp in battles at Fort Steadman, VA and Petersburg, VA.

Jacob's brother George wrote about Jacob's Civil War service in his 1875 letter:

"During the Civil War George JACOB'S lot came to go into the army, and he went to Petersburg and Richmond in Virginia. He returned to Wisconsin safe and sound at the close of the war. It was hard for him to leave wife and children. He told me that sometimes everything was a cemetery for the fallen soldiers."

In another letter, written in 1908 to his sister-in-law, Matilda Druschel, in Oregon, George writes again of brother Jacob:

"The family of my brother Jacob has had much grief and heartache. He has about 118 acres, about 80 acres in hills and woodlands, and a few acres of swampland."

We don't know what that “grief and heartache” was.

Jacob and Agnes stayed in Sauk Co., WI. The 1870, 1880, and 1900 census shows them in Franklin Township. In 1910 they are living in Prairie du Sac; Agnes reports having birthed 9 children, 8 still living. (Their son William died at age 27.) All the children stayed in Sauk Co except for the eldest, Jacob, who moved to Iowa.

Here is a very little bit about each of George Jacob's children:

Jacob married Amelia Buttke and raised a family of one child in Iowa
Salome married Albert Hudson. They raised a family of one child in Lodi, WI.
William never married. He died at age 27.
John lived in Prairie du Sac and clerked at Conger and Schoephorsters General Store. He married Emma Ragatz and had five children all of whom stayed in the area
Sarah and her sister, Rosina, married brothers, Felix and Fred Sprecher. Sarah married Felix and had three children. Sarah's granddaughter, Doris Listcher writes for the local paper in Prairie du Sac and has written articles about the Wintermantels and drew the picture of the Wintermantels Coming to America.
Mary married August Mellentine. They had no children. They stayed in Prairie du Sac.
George F. never married. He and his brother Christian ran a butcher shop in Reedsburg. George liked to tell limmericks.
Christian ran the Butcher shop with George. He also never married.
Rosina Agnes married Fred Sprecher, bother of Felix, husband of her sister Sarah. Rosina (Rose) had five children. One of whom, Wilbert, has a wife, Marcella Felix Sprecher, still living at 102. Another child, still living, is Rosina's daughter, Ruth. Ruth is the mother of my dear friend, Marilyn, that I know from church.

John Jacob and Salome Walter Wintermantel's sixth child was John George Wintermantel (known as George) (1835 Ihringen, Baden – 1920 Sauk County, WI.) We have two wonderful letters that George wrote, one to the folks back in Germany in 1875, the second to his sister-in-law, Matilda Druschel in Canby, Oregon in 1908. Those letters are the basis for much that we know about these Wintermantels and their circumstances.

The 1860 census shows George working on the farm of Frederick and Catherine Rose. They had a 15 year old daughter Charlotte he must have been sweet on, because he married her two years later. She gave birth to a baby girl, Charlotte, in Nov 1863,then died 23 Dec 1863. George's sister Salome took Baby Charlotte to care for. A year later George married Anna Kindshi. With her he had five girls, and then finally a boy, Frederick in 1881. Fred is said to have told that his father regarded his eight cows as being “a sizable herd.”

In 1871 George purchased a farm on Sauk County Hwy PF two miles west of the Ragatz Church. During the Wintermantel Reunion of 2003 we were able to tour the farmhouse that still stands. It is a Swiss style house made with very thick sandstone walls in a distinctive mode called Block and Stack.

John Jacob and Salome Walter Wintermantel's seventh child was William Frederick Wintermantle (known as William) – (1838 Ihringen, Baden – 1927 Portland, OR). He married Sarah Dengel and had eight children, four of which survived to 1900: George, Mary E. (married Stone), Rosa (married Finnigan), Sadie (married Enke). William and Sarah and all their children ended up living in Oregon. Like his brothers Jacob and Christian, William served in the Civil War. We have the following from brother George about William's Civil War service and his life up to 1875:

"Brother William enlisted in the army in the beginning of the war. He served 3 years in the 3rd Wisconsin Cavalry Regiment, mostly under General Bloncl in the southwest, in Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas and in Indian Territory. He was in many battles and bloody situations, and in danger day and night between southern rebels and enemy Indians. In 1865 he moved with John Jacob to Iowa where he bought and sold farms several times, naturally not without profit. But two years ago he moved to Kansas where he again acquired 160 acres of land. Probably, according to law, every soldier with an honorable discharge was entitled to 160 acres of land. He sold a farm in Iowa, I think it was 730 acres. His wife was a daughter of a German preacher from Illinois."

William testified extensively during his brother, Christian's, pension case, of which we have the file. He testified that Christian and Matilda moved together from Wisconsin to Iowa after the war and they lived together with William's family in Iowa until 1874 when William and his family moved on to Kansas.

William and Sarah's daughter Mary married Andrew Stone and had six children. The third was a girl named Bercha. Bercha grew up and married a man named Earlyn Besaw, so her name was Bercha Besaw. I'll bet there weren't too many Bercha Besaws around.

Bercha's eldest sibling was a boy named Lawrence Orr Stone. Lawrence and his wife had four children. His wife may have died before 1940, I'm not sure. But the 1940 census shows him married to another woman with no sign of his children. I finally found one of them, 12 year old Betty Louise Stone, living in the Waverly Children's Home in Portland, Oregon. This was basically an orphanage. I shall continue to look for the other three children Cletus, Donald, and Marjorie Stone

John Jacob and Salome Walter Wintermantel's eighth child was Rosina Wintermantel (b. 1840 Ihringen, Baden – 1923 Leola, South Dakota). Rosina married Paulus Heitz and they had eleven children. They moved to Minnesota in 1865. On the 1910 Census Rosina reports she has had 11 children/ 10 are still living. Their daughter Salome had died in 1894.

John Jacob and Salome Walter Wintermantel's ninth child was Christian Wintermantel (1842 Ihringen, Baden – 1897 Canby, Oregon) Christian is our second Wintermantel immigrant ancestor. He has his own story.

Here ends the story of the first three Wintermantel generations that we know about. They lived in a beautiful part of Germany, then called Baden, in the village of Ihringen. The first two generations were mostly farmers. Their lives were short and filled with hard work. Our immigrant ancestor, Johann Jacob (1799) was a farmer, a wine merchant and perhaps, “Bürgermeister.” He and his wife Sally, to keep their sons from being conscripted as Hessian soldiers, packed up their lives and their family and followed their two oldest sons to America. They settled in Sauk County, Wisconsin where they lived together into ripe old age and their children produced many descendants now in Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, Oregon and other places.

So Hooray for the Wintermantels!

Love, Granny

Salome Stalbar Walter:

Buried: Black Hawk Cemetery, Troy Twsp, Sauk Co, WI 23

Notes:

middle name is from Doris Gasser book.

(03) George Frederich Wintermantle:

Notes:

From "The Wintermantel Story - Beginnings" by Dianne Z. Stevens - 2013

John Jacob and Salome Walter Wintermantel's third child was George Frederich Wintermantle ( 1827 Ihringen, Baden – 1847 Louisville, Ky) Sadly, George Frederick never made it to Wisconsin. Brother George writes (1875 letter to Germany):

"We never saw anything more of Brother Frederich. According to J. J. Angaben he died in 1847 in Louisville, Kentucky."

This comment has puzzled researchers. Who was J. J. Angaben?

One researcher, M. Jenstad, had the following insight (email 2009):

"I've always just figured he must have been some researcher someone used before I was actively involved in genealogy. I've tried looking for that surname.....can't find it ANYWHERE! Today I had a new thought......using Babelfish website I entered "angeben" as a German word, and it came back as the word, "indicate".
Could this possibly mean that "according to J. J. (meaning John Jacob Wintermantel 2nd, who came to America before his parents), angeben (meaning "indicated") he died in 1847....so it might read:
'According to J. J. (Wintermantel), he indicated he (George Frederick) died in 1847 in Louisville, Kentucky.'
...This would then probably mean that John Jacob W. (2nd) and George Friedrich W. had found each other in America ."

Footnotes
  1. Wintermantle, Minnie, note, Wintermantle.
  2. edited by Glazier and Filby, Germans to America, Vol 10, p. 88.
  3. Census, Federal - 1860 - Sauk Co, WI, Township of Franklin, Post Office White Mound (near Plain), P. 159; Ancestry p. 9 of 14.
    (31 Aug 1860)

    line 30 dwelling 1206 household #1187

    Wintermantel, Jacob age 61 farmer value RE $400 born Baden
    Salome 60 Baden
    John Jacob 32 butcher Baden
    Mary 28 "
    William 22 "
    Rosa 18 in school "
    Christian 16 in school "

  4. Census, Federal - 1870 - Sauk CO, WI, Twsp of Franklin, PO Plain, p. 19 (87).
    (5 Jul 1870)

    Line 25 Dwelling # 144 Household #134

    Smitty, Matthew age 49 Farm Laborer value PE $400 born: Bavaria
    Sarah 48 "
    Mathew 18 Farm Laborer "
    Christian 11 WI
    Catherine 4 WI
    line 30 Household # 135

    Wintermantle, Jacob 70 Farmer Value RE $600 PE $150 Bavaria
    Sally 70 "

    line 32 Dwelling # 145 Household # 136

    Wintermantle, Jacob Jr. 38 Farmer Value RE $1200 PE $500 Bavaria
    Agnes 33 Switzerland
    Jacob 10 WI
    Sally 8 WI
    William 6 WI
    John 4 WI
    Sarah 2 WI

  5. Compiled by Elbert J. Wardle, Wintermantle Genealogy: Christian and Mathilda's Family Tree 1799 to 1986 (informal publication, July 1986).

    The Wintermantel Family

    The Wintermantel family originated in Switzerland from around the late 1300's and were of the Aristocracy. Those we have record of were from the Freiburg area of Germany in the province of Baden Wurtemberg.

    According to Paul Wintermantel, sometime prior to the Thirty Years War, which began in 1618, there were three Wintermantel brothers. One remained in Switzerland while another journeyed to Austria and the third emigrated to the Baden Wurtemberg region of Germany. As far as we are able to determine, all Wintermantels originating out of Germany are descendants of the brother who emigrated to Baden from Switzerland.

    John Jacob Wintermantel lived close enough to the Alps that he could see them while herding the sheep and cattle. Like the Alsace region of France, the Baden area is wine growing country. John Jacob was a wine merchant, also. There are still many Wintermantels in the Baden area to this day. Most Wintermantels were peasants or farmers. Many were Lutheran although some were Roman Catholic as documented by old birth records.

    Beginning with the Thirty Years War until Bismark consolidated the German states in 1871, there was civil strife and religious fighting between the Lutherans and Catholics throughout Germany. During the 1800's there was a mass migration of people to America, including John Jacob Wintermantel and his family about 1855.

    The route followed by the family was by wagon to Chur, Switzerland. From Chur, the family crossed into France traveling northward to the Alsace Lorraine area where they worked in the vineyards for a while. They traveled along the Seine River to the vicinity of Paris and on to England where they boarded a ship to America for the three week crossing. At the time this trip was made, it was more than likely a clipper ship. After reaching New York, John Jacob Wintermantel's family settled in Wisconsin at Prairie du Sac.

    Three of John Jacob Wintermantel's sons served in the Civil War. Christian ran away
    from home and joined the army when he was 17 years old (1859). He fought in
    Company K of the 26th division of the Wisconsin Infantry for three years. He was in
    many of the largest battles including Fredericksburg, Chancellorville and Gettysburg.

    George Jacob left his wife and small children to serve in the Army at Richmond,
    Virginia during the War. He married at the age of 27 in 1859 to Angie Yoos.

    Wilhelm (William) served three years in the Third Wisconsin Calvary Regiment. He
    fought in Indian Territory as well as Missouri, Kansas and Arkansas.

    All three sons returned safely to Wisconsin from the War although all suffered from
    arthritis as a result of being in the cold and damp. George Jacob remained in
    Wisconsin while his brothers, John Jacob Jr. and William moved to Iowa in 1865.
    Christian met and married Matilda Fey in Sauk City, Wisconsin in 1866. They
    followed William and John Jacob,Jr. to Iowa in 1868 with their two daughters, Rosina
    and Tillie.

    Christian moved around in Iowa as the records show his son William born in Hull,
    Iowa and Clara born in Blackhawk. Christian brought his family to Oregon on the first
    Northern Pacific train, probably to Portland. They washed their clothes on Sunday
    when the train did not run. The family moved to Jefferson, Oregon in 1883 and lived
    there before moving on to Canby, Oregon. Christian died in 1897 and is buried in the-
    Zion cemetery in Canby.

    Matilda Fey Wintermantel then married William Druschell. They raised his children
    since his wife had died in 1898. Matilda died in July 1922 and is buried with Christian
    in the Canby cemetery. Most or all of Christian's sons departed home as carpenters
    and eventually went into farming.

    [Some think the description of the view from Ihringen and of the journey out of the country to America, was perhaps copied from another Wintermantel source that lived elsewhere. Following is what Julie Edwards had to say about this issue:
    'OK, so it looks like a concensus on the Chur journey being incorrect. And
    as far as being able to see the Alps from Ihringen, here is a reply from
    Werner Schmidlin, a Schmiedlin cousin, who was born and raised in
    Bischoffingen (next to Ihringen), and now lives in Australia, so he would
    know for sure...
    ------
    "To your question could one see the Alps from Bischoffingen or Ihringen?
    The answer is no. If you look behind you in Ihringen or Bischoffingen
    you see the hills of the Kaiserstuhl. If you look west, you see the
    Vogue Mountains in France. If you go on top of the Hills on the
    Kaiserstuhl and look east, you see part of the Black Forrest. If you
    look towards Basel, about 50 Km away you do not see the Alps as the
    northern part of Switzerland is fairly flat or slightly undulated and the
    Alps are a fair way back."]

  6. Jacob Wintermantel Passport .


    "Passport No. 38 Hemisphere
    No. 11413 Purpose: To travel to America
    Canton Baden
    Oberheim Section Passpot Bureau Breisach

    Description:
    age - 55 years
    Height - 5 ft 9 in
    stature - slim
    face - longish, healthy
    hair - brown
    Forehead - high
    eyebrows - brown
    eyes - blue
    nose - pointed
    mouth - middlesized
    beard - small beard in cheeks
    chin - round
    distinguishing marks - none
    Personal affairs - married

    Signature - Jacob Wintermantel

    All native and foreign civil and military authorities are requested to let the holder of this passport -
    Jacob Wintrmantel
    and his wife, Salome Walter
    and their six children -
    Anna Maria - 26
    George Jacob - 24
    John George - 24
    William - 17
    Rosina - 15
    Christian - 13
    born in Ihringen, residing in Ihringen, who wish to travel to North America in order to settle there, travel free and without hindrance, also providing protection and help if needed. This pass was issued upon proper payment in triplicate, 9 April 1856.
    Witnessed by Gortsch - Passport Bureau."
    translated by Meta Fashing.

  7. Letter from George Wintermantle to relatives in Germany (from papers received from Paul Wintermantel via Patsy Clark; June 2003).

    After a wait of 2 days in New York we journeyed directly to Wisconsin and settled in Honey Creek, Sauk County, where we worked for the first few months for different farmers until August when our father moved a few miles farther and, in September, bought 40 acres of land for $1.00 an acre. Next spring we built a house on this land, and that is where the parents now live.

    The first years father broke up 20 to 30 acres of land with the help of Jacob and William planted a vineyard and fruit trees, so that the parents have a pretty nice home. Both are still living. Father is still well and strong for his age. Mother is somewhat frail, but still pretty well. They live in well-to- circumstances and know nothing of want, for their land has produced MANY A GOOD HARVEST of wheat, oats, corn, wine and different vegetables with which you are acquainted too.

    The land was still pretty wild when we arrived. The first ones came to this region about 10 years earlier, most of them from Switzerland, others from North Germany and South Germany and from the Alsace, still others from the eastern and southern states. Until 1846, wild people and wild animals were the only inhabitants of this region. And some of the original inhabitants are still present.

  8. Doris Litscher Gasser, Wintermantels: Schmiedlin Branch reunion (Sauk Prairie Star; 18Sep2003).

    The Wintermantels purchased a farm in Irish Valley and built a home. They sold the farm to Martin Yanke in 1907 and his descendants continue to live there. The house was in the path of the same tornado that destroyed the Catholic Church in Plain in 1918.

  9. Ihringen Evangelical Church records, 1189610.

    1799

    Johann Jakob Wintermantel

    The 28th of August between 10 and 11 p.m., born, and the 29th of the same (August) christened

    father: Johann Jakob Wintermantel
    citizen here.
    Mother: Catharina nee Muller.

    Christening Witnesses:
    1. Jakob Walther, citizen and caregiver here
    2. Wilhelm Muller, single here.
    3. Salome Birmelin, single here.
    4. Anna Maria nee Muller, wife of Johannes Mossner, citizen here.

    [copy of original in files of Dianne Z. Stevens]

  10. J. E., Schmiedlin Reunion 2003 (informal 2003).

    1846 1847 The 2 oldest Wintermantel sons,JOHN Jacob and George FREDERICH, traveled to America, together or separately. (And 3 Gugel sons came as well--Jacob in 1846, John in 1851, and George in 1854.)

    1847 Frederich Wintermantel died in Louisville, Kentucky.

    9 April 1856 The remaining members of the Wintermantel family (except the married daughter salome and her husband Mathias Schmiedlin, and children, who remained in Germany...), were issued a passport at Breisach, Baden, Germany, near Ihringen.

    24 April 1856 John Jacob Wintermantel, his wife, Salome (Walter), and children -- Anna Maria, George JACOB, John GEORGE, Wilhelm Frederick, Rosina and Christian, left Ihringen. Also, Jacob and Catherine Gugel's remaining family left Ihringen on the same day, with the following remaining children -- William, Christian, Kate, Barbara and Sarah. The oldest daughter, Anna May Gugel and her husband, George Wintermantle, remained in Ihringen until 1857.
    The Wintermantel and Gugel families arrived in Kehl, Baden, by train that evening, and stayed there overnight.

    25 April 1856 The families crossed the Rhine River and went to Strasburg, Alsace, France, and later that evening started for Paris.

    26 April 1856 The families arrived in Paris, and that night the journey was resumed for le Havre, France.

    27 April 1856 In the morning, the families arrived in le Havre, and spent several days there.

    30 April 1856 In the evening the families boarded the sailboat "Hemisphere".

    1 May 1856 In the morning the ship Hemisphere started for America.

    7 June 1856 After a voyage of 37 days, the Hemisphere arrived in New York. Jacob Gugel had been ill before the voyage, but it was hoped the trip would improve his health. Instead, "he was taken to the hospital shortly after arriving in New York, where he died of palsy and a complication of diseases, at the age of 68 years, and was buried on Staten Island". (The rest of the Gugel family settled in Logansport, Indiana where the oldest Gugel son, Jacob, had been given a land grant for his service in the Mexican War.)

    18 June 1856 The Wintermantel's arrived in Little Prairie, Wisconsin.

  11. Jan Bender, Patsy Clark, Julie Edwards, and Margaret Ann Jenstad; about 2002, Descendants of John Jacob Wintermantel.
  12. Ihringen Evangelical Church records, 1189610.
  13. Jan Bender, Patsy Clark, Julie Edwards, and Margaret Ann Jenstad; about 2002, Descendants of John Jacob Wintermantel.
  14. Patsy Clark <gclark168@comcast.net >, Cemeteries - an Email (dated 9May2003).

    Section C; Row 5

  15. edited by Glazier and Filby, Germans to America, vol 10, p. 88.
  16. Census, Federal - 1860 - Sauk Co, WI, Township of Franklin, Post Office White Mound (near Plain), Ancestry p. 9 of 14.

    line 30 dwelling 1206 household #1187

    Wintermantel, Jacob age 61 farmer value RE $400 born Baden
    Salome 60 Baden
    John Jacob 32 butcher Baden
    Mary 28 "
    William 22 "
    Rosa 18 in school "
    Christian 16 in school "

  17. Census, Federal - 1870 - Sauk CO, WI, Twsp of Franklin, PO Plain, Ancestry p. 19 of 20.
    (5 Jul 1870)

    Line 25 Dwelling # 144 Household #134

    Smitty, Matthew age 49 Farm Laborer value PE $400 born: Bavaria
    Sarah 48 "
    Mathew 18 Farm Laborer "
    Christian 11 WI
    Catherine 4 WI
    line 30 Household # 135

    Wintermantle, Jacob 70 Farmer Value RE $600 PE $150 Bavaria
    Sally 70 "

    line 32 Dwelling # 145 Household # 136

    Wintermantle, Jacob Jr. 38 Farmer Value RE $1200 PE $500 Bavaria
    Agnes 33 Switzerland
    Jacob 10 WI
    Sally 8 WI
    William 6 WI
    John 4 WI
    Sarah 2 WI

  18. Census, Federal - 1880 - Sauk Co, WI, Twsp of Franklin, ED# 251, Ancestry p. 1 of 21.

    Line 34 Dwellin # 8 Household # 8

    Schmiedlin, Matheas ae 59 Farmer Prussia Prussia Prussia
    Salomea 57 wife " " "
    Matheas 27 son " " " Occ: Farmer
    Christian 19 son WI " " Works on farm

    line 38 Dwelling # 9 Household # 9

    Wintermantel, Salomea 80 Ol Age Prussia Prussia Prussia disabled box is checked

    line 39 Dwelling # 10 Household # 10

    Wintermantel, Jacob 47 Farmer Prussia Prussia Prussia
    Agnes 42 wife Switz Switz Switz
    Jacob 19 son WI Prussia Switz health issue: Dyspepsia
    Salomea 17 dau same
    Wilhelm 15 son "
    Johann 13 son "
    Sarah 11 dau "
    Maria 9 dau "
    Geoge F. 7 son "
    Christian 5 son "
    Rosina A. 2 dau "

  19. Doris Litcher Gasser, Wintermantels Bound for America 1856 (unpublished).
  20. Census, Federal - 1860 - Sauk Co, WI, Franklin Twsp.
  21. Jan Bender, Patsy Clark, Julie Edwards, and Margaret Ann Jenstad; about 2002, Descendants of John Jacob Wintermantel.
  22. Ibid.
  23. Patsy Clark <gclark168@comcast.net >, Cemeteries - an Email (dated 9May2003).

    [s/w Johann J. Wintermantel, Section C, Row 5]

  24. Jan Bender, Patsy Clark, Julie Edwards, and Margaret Ann Jenstad; about 2002, Descendants of John Jacob Wintermantel.
  25. Census, Federal - 1880 - Sauk Co, WI, Twsp of Franklin, ED# 251, Ancestry p. 1 of 21.

    Line 34 Dwellin # 8 Household # 8

    Schmiedlin, Matheas ae 59 Farmer Prussia Prussia Prussia
    Salomea 57 wife " " "
    Matheas 27 son " " " Occ: Farmer
    Christian 19 son WI " " Works on farm

    line 38 Dwelling # 9 Household # 9

    Wintermantel, Salomea 80 Ol Age Prussia Prussia Prussia disabled box is checked

    line 39 Dwelling # 10 Household # 10

    Wintermantel, Jacob 47 Farmer Prussia Prussia Prussia
    Agnes 42 wife Switz Switz Switz
    Jacob 19 son WI Prussia Switz health issue: Dyspepsia
    Salomea 17 dau same
    Wilhelm 15 son "
    Johann 13 son "
    Sarah 11 dau "
    Maria 9 dau "
    Geoge F. 7 son "
    Christian 5 son "
    Rosina A. 2 dau "

  26. Letter from George Wintermantle to relatives in Germany (from papers received from Paul Wintermantel via Patsy Clark; June 2003).

    M. Schmidlins live close by our parents. He had father's farm in rent for several years. but then they bought out an Irishman. The two older daughters are married. Several children were born in America, and several have died. The parents
    and the rest of the children are healthy and well.

  27. Census, Federal - 1870 - Sauk CO, WI, Twsp of Franklin, PO Plain, Franklin, Sauk, Wisconsin.

    Name: Sarah Smitty
    [Sarah Scmiedlin]
    [Sarah Schmiedlin]
    Age in 1870: 48
    Birth Year: abt 1822
    Birthplace: Bavaria / Bayern
    Home in 1870: Franklin, Sauk, Wisconsin
    Race: White
    Gender: Female
    Post Office: Plain
    Value of real estate: View Image
    Household Members: Name Age
    Mathew Smitty 49
    Sarah Smitty 48
    Mathew Smitty 18
    Christiane Smitty 10
    Catherine Smitty 4

    [The Schmiedlin family is living in the same house with Salome's parents, Jacob and Sally Wintermantel. Next door are Jacob and Agnes Wintermantel and family, Salome's brother.]

  28. Census, Federal - 1870 - Madison Co, IA roll #407, Jackson Twsp.
    (25 Aug 1870)

    Wintermantel, John age 38 Farmer b.Baden
    Carolina 36 Baden cannot read or write
    Peter 18 PA
    Caroline 16 IL
    Frederick 14 IL
    Henry 9 IL
    Charles 7 IL
    Emily 3 IA
    John 9/12 IA (Dec)
    Schoeplin, Mary 73 Baden

    [The first five children listed on this census are Carolina's from her first marriage to Peter Lotz]

  29. Jan Bender, Patsy Clark, Julie Edwards, and Margaret Ann Jenstad; about 2002, Descendants of John Jacob Wintermantel.
  30. Margaret Ann Jenstad, "K & M Jenstad" <jenstad@pro-ns.net>, John J. Wintermantel data so far............. (an Email dated 29 Apr 2003).
  31. Census, Federal - 1860 - Sauk Co, WI, Township of Franklin, Post Office White Mound (near Plain), Ancestry p. 9 of 14.

    line 30 dwelling 1206 household #1187

    Wintermantel, Jacob age 61 farmer value RE $400 born Baden
    Salome 60 Baden
    John Jacob 32 butcher Baden
    Mary 28 "
    William 22 "
    Rosa 18 in school "
    Christian 16 in school "

  32. Letter from George Wintermantle to relatives in Germany (from papers received from Paul Wintermantel via Patsy Clark; June 2003).

    Brother John Jacob was found by Brother William in Memphis in 1860 and then took the train to Wisconsin. He lived for several years with the parents. In 1865 he went to Iowa, bought land, married, sold the land again, moved farther west, bought other land at Winterset, Iowa County, Iowa, where he now lives. He is a widower, but lives in well-to-do circumstances.

  33. Census, Federal 1880, Madison Co., Iowa, Jackson twsp ED 110, p. 36.
    (Jun 1880)

    Wintermantel, J. age 50 head Farmer Baden Baden Baden widowed
    A. R. 12 dau IA Baden Baden
    J. W. 10 son IA Baden Baden
    Lotz, C. F. 16 step-son IL Hesse Baden

  34. Jan Bender, Patsy Clark, Julie Edwards, and Margaret Ann Jenstad; about 2002, Descendants of John Jacob Wintermantel.
  35. Ibid.
  36. Letter from George Wintermantle to relatives in Germany (from papers received from Paul Wintermantel via Patsy Clark; June 2003).

    We never saw anything more of Brother Fredrich. According to J. J. Angaben he died in 1847 in Louisville, Kentucky.

  37. Doris Litscher Gasser, Wintermantels: Schmiedlin Branch reunion (Sauk Prairie Star; 18Sep2003).

    Another son, Frderich, came by himself via New Orleans and the Mississippi. He was never found by his family and is buried inLouisville, Kentucky.

  38. edited by Glazier and Filby, Germans to America, Vol 10, p. 88.
  39. Census, Federal - 1860 - Sauk Co, WI, Township of Franklin, Post Office White Mound (near Plain), Ancestry p. 9 of 14.

    line 30 dwelling 1206 household #1187

    Wintermantel, Jacob age 61 farmer value RE $400 born Baden
    Salome 60 Baden
    John Jacob 32 butcher Baden
    Mary 28 "
    William 22 "
    Rosa 18 in school "
    Christian 16 in school "

  40. Letter from George Wintermantle to relatives in Germany (from papers received from Paul Wintermantel via Patsy Clark; June 2003).

    Sister Anna Maria has also died. She was married to Rudolf Jager, a
    cobbler from Hanover. He died 3 years earlier in 1867.

  41. Jan Bender, Patsy Clark, Julie Edwards, and Margaret Ann Jenstad; about 2002, Descendants of John Jacob Wintermantel.
  42. Ibid.
    (Apr 2003)
  43. Census, Special, of Civil War veterans and widows - 1890.
  44. Census, Federal - 1870 - Sauk CO, WI, Twsp of Franklin, PO Plain, p. 19.
    (5 Jul 1870)

    Line 25 Dwelling # 144 Household #134

    Smitty, Matthew age 49 Farm Laborer value PE $400 born: Bavaria
    Sarah 48 "
    Mathew 18 Farm Laborer "
    Christian 11 WI
    Catherine 4 WI
    line 30 Household # 135

    Wintermantle, Jacob 70 Farmer Value RE $600 PE $150 Bavaria
    Sally 70 "

    line 32 Dwelling # 145 Household # 136

    Wintermantle, Jacob Jr. 38 Farmer Value RE $1200 PE $500 Bavaria
    Agnes 33 Switzerland
    Jacob 10 WI
    Sally 8 WI
    William 6 WI
    John 4 WI
    Sarah 2 WI

  45. Census, Federal - 1880 - Sauk Co, WI, Twsp of Franklin, ED# 251, p.1of 21.
    (Jun 1880)

    Line 34 Dwellin # 8 Household # 8

    Schmiedlin, Matheas ae 59 Farmer Prussia Prussia Prussia
    Salomea 57 wife " " "
    Matheas 27 son " " " Occ: Farmer
    Christian 19 son WI " " Works on farm

    line 38 Dwelling # 9 Household # 9

    Wintermantel, Salomea 80 Ol Age Prussia Prussia Prussia disabled box is checked

    line 39 Dwelling # 10 Household # 10

    Wintermantel, Jacob 47 Farmer Prussia Prussia Prussia
    Agnes 42 wife Switz Switz Switz
    Jacob 19 son WI Prussia Switz health issue: Dyspepsia
    Salomea 17 dau same
    Wilhelm 15 son "
    Johann 13 son "
    Sarah 11 dau "
    Maria 9 dau "
    Geoge F. 7 son "
    Christian 5 son "
    Rosina A. 2 dau "

  46. Census, Federal - 1900 - Sauk Co., WI, Twsp of Franklin ED134 p.3A.
  47. Census, Federal - 1860 - Sauk Co., WI, Bear Creek Twsp - roll 1429, p. 146 [504] PO Sandusky.
    (25 Aug 1860)

    Jacob Wintermantel age 30 shoemaker b. Baden
    Agnes 22 Switz

  48. Wisconsin State Historical Society - Veterans Museum, Civil War - Certificate of Service.

    Certificate of Service

    Civil War Service

    Jacob Wintermantle

    The Official Record: Entered Service October 29, 1864. Into Company H Thirty-Seventh Wisconsin Infantry from Franklin, Wisconsin. Drafted; Mustered out of service July 27, 1865

    Engagements
    Assault on Fort Steadman, VA
    Assault on Petersburg, VA

    Thirtyseventh Infantry. The Thirtyseventh regiment was organized at Camp Randall, Madison, Wisconsin. On April 28 six companies left the State, two companies following a few days later, proceeding to Washington D.C. On the 30th of May it left for the front, being assigned to the Ninth Army Corps. On the 10th the Thirtyseventh marched to Cold Harbor where the regiment joined the Army of the Potomac and was assigned to the Ninth Army Corps. It reached the enemies lines before Petersburg and participated in the charge on the rebel entrenchments on the 17th of June 1864. From that time until the surrender of the Confrederates in the following April, the regiment was frequently engaged with the Ninth Corps in the numerous battles about Petersburg and Richmond. After the surrender of Lee the Thirtyseventh participated in the Grand Review at Washington and remained about that city until the 26th of July, when it was mustered out of service of the United States, returned to Madison, Wisconsin, and was disbanded.

  49. Census, Federal - 1910 - Sauk, WI, Prairie du Sac Village, Ancestry p.1, line 40.
    (15 Apr 1910)

    Line 40 Dwelling 12 Family #12

    Wintermentel, Jacob head age 78 m 1st 50yrs Ger Ger Ger imm: 1849 nat occ: own income
    Agnes 73 m 1st 50yrs Swit Swit Swit 1817 9 chil b/8 living

  50. Doris Litscher Gasser, Drafted into the Civil War after Finally Reaching Freedom (Sauk Prairie Star; Thursday, October 12, 2006).
  51. Obituary, unknown newspaper.

    Obituary - Wintermantel

    Jacob Geo. Wintermantel was born in Germany, February 27, 1832. He came to this country June 18, 1856, to Sauk County, Wisconsin, and was united in marriage to Agnes Joos in 1859; to this union were born nine children. Over 50 years they shared the joys and sorrows of married life. His life's companion passed into the better world June 29, 1915, One son also preceded him in death.
    In obedience to the call of his country, he joined the army in 1864, and served in that capacity nine months, or to the war's close. Having located in town Franklin, they made that their home until about fifteen years ago, when they moved to Prairie du Sac to retire from the strenuous farm life and rest from its labors. Since the death of his lifemate he made his home with children in town Troy. For sometime with his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Aug. Mellentine and Mr. and Mrs. Felix Sprecher, and the time just previous to his death with Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sprecher. Here his children did all in their power to make life pleasant and comfortable for him in his weakness and infirmity. He suffered much during the later years of his life, For the last few weeks his health failed rapidly, his strength left him and on the 17th of October, 1916, his end came due to apoplexy.
    He affiliated himself with the so called Schlosser's church of the Evangelical association near Leland many years ago, and when they moved to Prairie du Sac with the Evangelical church there. He was faithful and loyal to the church of his choice, in which he served his God according to the dictates of his conscience, enlightened by the Holy Spirit.
    He leaves to mourn his departure four daughters, four sons, one sister, two brothers, besides many other relatives and friends.
    The daughters are Mrs. A. C. Hudson, Reedsburg; Mrs. Aug. Mellentine, Mrs. Felix Sprecher and Mrs. Fred Sprecher of Troy. The sons are Jacob of Hull, Ia.; John of Prairie du Sac; George and Chris. of Reedsburg. All were present at the funeral. Funeral services were conducted in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sprecher and in the Evangrelical church at Black Hawk by Revs Ph. Schneider and A. E. Happe. Internment was made in the Black Hawk cemetery.

    [from a Wintermantel folder belonging to Ruth Sprecher Hehenberger]

  52. Letter from George Wintermantle to relatives in Germany (from papers received from Paul Wintermantel via Patsy Clark; June 2003).

    Brother George JACOB lives beside Schmidlin. He was married in 1859 to Agnes Joos, who as a little girl came from Switzerland with her parents. He does little as a cobbler, but in his farming he already has good help from his boys.

    During the Civil War George JACOB'S lot came to go into the army, and he went to Petersburg and Richmond in Virginia. He returned to Wisconsin safe and sound at the close of the war. It was hard for him to leave wife and children. He told me that sometimes everything was a cemetery for the fallen soldiers.

  53. George Wintermantle, Letter from George Wintermantle to Mathilda Druschel 1/16/1908.

    The family of my brother Jacob has had much grief and heartache. He has about 118 acres, about 80 acres in hills and woodlands, and a few acres of swampland.

  54. Census, Federal - 1900 - Sauk Co., WI, Twsp of Franklin ED134 p.3A.
  55. Jan Bender, Patsy Clark, Julie Edwards, and Margaret Ann Jenstad; about 2002, Descendants of John Jacob Wintermantel.
    (Apr 2003)
  56. Ibid.
  57. George Wintermantle, Letter from George Wintermantle to Mathilda Druschel 1/16/1908.

    John George Wintermantel letter of 1908 to sister-in-law Mathilda(Fey) in Oregon,
    as translated by (someone found by Patsy Clark) July 2003:

    page 1
    Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin - January 16, 1908
    Dear Sister-in-law Mathilda,
    God's grace and greetings.
    I will take time today to write you a letter. I received the letter you wrote on October 16th. We had already heard of the death of your husband. That will mean an important change in your family's life and work as it usually does in such circumstances. Everything on this earth is subject to change - no exceptions. We are, thank God, healthy. Since last spring I have lived in Prairie du Sac with my eldest daughter, Lotte. She built a house in town last summer, and by the middle of September it was ready to move into and since then we have lived in it. It is built of red brick, 26x28, two story, and a basement. it is a nice-looking little house, nicely arranged, and cost (with the lot) a little over $1900.

    *Here he changes the topic and without mentioning anyone goes on like this*

    The impact of a mentally disturbed person is such that he will run around town and talk

    page 2 of translation
    constantly. This state will last for a few weeks and then there are weeks when he won't leave the house or talk to anyone and shows no interest in what goes on around him. I am of the opinion that he is not seriously ill, although he suffers a lot with blind hemorrhoids. You can imagine how much worry and heartache this causes, otherwise we could live quite comfortably in town. His pension was raised to $20 a month and they have some capital from the farm so they have the means for a decent life. The Straub farm where Charlotte lived for almost 20 years was sold for $10,000. The notice in the paper was that they were looking for an heir, so I wrote to the Milwaukee paper and it was a different Wintermantel they were looking for. I expected that, since I couldn't imagine how I could inherit anything. The crops in 1907 were not very good. Wheat is not used much. Oats was light. Because of too much rain and not enough warmth, the corn did not ripen satisfactorally. The price for cattle and pigs has

    page 3 of translation:
    by 1/3. It seems the upswing in business the last 8 or 10 years will go in the other direction now. It was to be expected. We have nice winters, very little snow, no severe colds, mostly sunny days, and few cold winds. We hear that Madison, Chicago, and Milwaukee have a lot of snow. On June 19th my son Friedrich got married to Laura Witwen, daughter of John Witwen, whose father built the (?) mill. Th wedding was in Baraboo where the family is living now. John is the county treasuer. It was a very small wedding with only the immediate family present. Soon after they went on a honeymoon trip to Nebraska where my daughter Rosina, and her husband, Ernst Rahlmeier, live, then to Hudson, Wisconsin where Julia and her husband, Edward Parman, live. Both of these men are farmers. Wilhelm Stueber, who used to live in Prairie du Sac, traded in his nice house for a farm so now the family lives in the town of Lodi, Coilumbia County, Wisconsin, about 8 miles east of Prairie du Sac. Of all my sons-in-law there is only one who is not a farmer, namely....

    page 4 of translation:
    Conrad Adam. He's a miller in Black Hawk. The family of my brother Jacob has had much grief and heartache. He has about 118 acres, about 80 acres in hills and woodlands, and a few acres of swampland. On my farm is Friedrich, who is renting it. He had some good years and made a lot of money, but he is not frugal. He wants to buy the farm, but I am reluctant to sell, although I don't intend ever to go back on it to live. I like it better in town. We live in a nice locality. About 300 steps from the house the railroad runs by that goes to Mazomanie, to Sauk City, and to Praire du Sac. When I awake at 7 in the morning I can see the train without raising my head - I just have to turn my face towards the window. In 15 minutes I can walk uptown or to church. In about 20 - 25 minutes I can be in the middle of Sauk City. Prairie du Sac is a nice little town. Pastor Buhler told me one could go far in America before finding a town as nice for its size as Prairie du Sac. The E. U. congregation and its surrounding community is a strong congregation. The church was built about two years a go and cost over $19,000 and about a...

    page 5 translation:
    year after its dedication it was all paid for. Since then the congregation has brought up more than $2000 for pastor's salary, missions, and support of Sunday school and misc. This fall I bought some more land not far from my house. We keep a cow and I hope there will be enough pasture for her next summer. Charlotte has a nice garden. She got 40 bushels of potatoes and other garden vegetables. I got 30 bushels of potatoes and 25 bushels of corn. Now I will close, hoping this finds you in good health. May God bless you with everything neede in time and eternity.
    Greetings to you all.
    Geo. Wintermantel.

  58. Census, Federal - 1870 - Sauk Co., WI, Twsp of Honey Creek.

    Name: John Winterman
    [John Wintermantel]
    Age in 1870: 32
    Birth Year: abt 1838
    Birthplace: Baden
    Home in 1870: Honey Creek, Sauk, Wisconsin
    Race: White
    Gender: Male
    Post Office: Sauk City
    Value of real estate: 3000
    Household Members: Name Age
    John Winterman 32 farmer
    Ana Winterman 28 from Switerland
    Charlotte Winterman 7
    Louisa Wintermantel 4
    Carlina Wintermantel 2

  59. Census, Federal - 1880 - Sauk Co, Wi, Honey Creek Twsp, ED# 254, p. 13.
    (Jun 1880)
  60. Census, Federal - 1860 - Sauk Co., WI, Honey Creek Twsp., Ancestry p. 191.
    (3 Oct 1860)

    Line 25 Dwellin # 1663 Family # 1643

    Frederick Rose age 48 M Farmer re $6000 PE $1000 born Hanover
    Catharine 44 F Prussia
    Charlotte 15 F WI attends school
    Henry 12 M WI "
    Frederick 8 M WI "
    Christian 3 M WI
    George Wintermantel 24 M Farm Laborer Baden

  61. Letter from George Wintermantle to relatives in Germany (from papers received from Paul Wintermantel via Patsy Clark; June 2003).

    Not like my brothers, I stayed in the same town and county where we settled in June, 1856. For five years I worked as a hired man for $140 a year. But in 1858 1 already bought 43 acres of land for $315. The following year I bought 20 acres more for $45. These 20 acres are hilly with much timber on them. In 1861 I made the beginning on this piece of land, and with the help of Brother Christian I cleared 8 acres of hazelbrush and burned it all in 8 days. We broke the land with a large plow and 5 yoke of oxen in 4 1/2 days. The next year I already threshed 157 bushels of wheat. The next spring I cleared five acres more on which I immediately planted corn and potatoes. Results were very good.

    In December, 1862, I married Charlotte Rose, daughter of Fredrich and Katrina Rose, but after a short marriage of I year and 2 weeks, my dear Charlotte died. Eleven weeks before her death a girl was born whom I turned over to my sister, Salome, for her upbringing. She was a real mother to the dear child until I was married again the following year to Anna Kindschi. She came with her father and relatives from Switzerland to America. With her I have 5 girls. Two are going to school. They are being taught German and English.

  62. Census, Federal - 1910 - Sauk, WI, Prairie du Sac Village, Ancestry p.14.
    (22 Apr 1910)

    Line 86 Dwelling 205 Family # 208 2nd Ave


    Straub, Charlotte head 46 WI GER MO 0 Chil b/0 living
    Mintermantle George brother 77 GER GER GER occ:own income imm: 1856 Na

  63. Doris Litscher Gasser, Wintermantels: Schmiedlin Branch reunion (Sauk Prairie Star; 18Sep2003).

    John George Wintermantel, known as George (1835 - 1920) son of John Jacob, must have been the most dedicated and afffluent writers in the family, for his work has provided treasured sources of information about life during their time. George purchased a farm two miles west of the Ragatz Church on PF in 1871. It was a typical Swiss style stone house brought to our attention recently as a block and stack design by Jane Eisley and Donald Kindschi.
    George married Charlotte Rose in 1862. They had a daughter, Charlotte. When Charlotte Rose, the mother, passed away, George married Anna Kindschi. George and Anna had seven more children, six daughters and then a son, Fred...Fred told that his father regarded his eight cows as being a sizable herd at the time.

  64. Census, Federal - 1900 - Sauk Co, Wi, Twsp Honey Creek ED137 .
  65. Jan Bender, Patsy Clark, Julie Edwards, and Margaret Ann Jenstad; about 2002, Descendants of John Jacob Wintermantel.
  66. Ibid.
  67. Census, Federal - 1860 - Sauk Co, WI, Township of Franklin, Post Office White Mound (near Plain), Ancestry p. 9 of 14.

    line 30 dwelling 1206 household #1187

    Wintermantel, Jacob age 61 farmer value RE $400 born Baden
    Salome 60 Baden
    John Jacob 32 butcher Baden
    Mary 28 "
    William 22 "
    Rosa 18 in school "
    Christian 16 in school "

  68. Civil War Soldiers, American (Ancestry.com).
  69. Civil War Certificate from WI State Historical Society.
  70. Census, Federal - 1870 - Madison Co, IA, Webster TWsp, PO Winterset, Ancestry p. 11 of 13.

    Line 31 Dwelling # 75 Family # 76

    Wintermantel, Wm age 31 Farmer born Baden
    Sarah 21 NY


    Family # 77

    Wintermantel, Shristian age 27 Farm Laborer born Baden
    Matilda 28 Prussia
    Rosena 3 WI
    Matilda 2 WI
    William 7/12 IA

  71. Census, Federal - 1880 - Multnomah Co, OR Fulton Precinct ED92, ED 92, p. 23.

    William Wintermantle self Married Male age 41 b. Baden Farmer fb: Baden mb: Baden
    Sarah H. wife M F 31 NY keeps House Bavaria Prussia
    George son S M 9 IA at school Baden NY
    Mary dau S F 7 IA at school " "
    Rosa dau S F 5 KS at home " "
    Sarah dau S F 2 KS at home " "

  72. Census, Federal - 1920 - Multnomah Co, Oregon, Portland, ED # 111; Ancestry p. 14 of 29.

    Line 95 819 Belmont St. Dwelling 131 Household # 158

    Stone, Mary E. Head R 47 wd IA GER NY Occ: None
    Laurence O. son 24 s OR IA IA Dyer in dye shop
    Bercha M. dau 20 s OR IA IA stenographer for US Shipping Board
    Emily E. dau 18 s OR IA IA telephone operator for Telephone Co.
    Rose M. dau 14 s OR IA IA none (in school)
    Lois R. dau 9 s OR IA IA none "

    next page - Line 1

    Stone, William W. Father 81 m. yr imm: 1856 Yr naturalized: 1878 Ger Ger Ger Occ: none
    Sarah A. Mother 71 m NY Bavaria France none


    [*The "William W. Stone" listed here in the 1920 census is actually William Frederick Winermantle b. 1838 in Ihringen, Germany.
    ]

  73. Census, Federal - 1900 - Multnomah Co, city of Portland, West Portland; ED 98; ancestry p. 1 of 7.

    Line 92 dwelling 146 household 147

    Wintermantel, Wm Head Apr 1838 age 62 m. 33 yrs Ger Ger Ger yr imm: 1856 # of yrs in USA: 44 occ: farmer
    Sarah wife Oct 1848 51 33 NY Ger Ger 8 ch born/ 4 living
    George H. son Jan 1871 29 s IA Ger Ger merchant
    Sadie dau Feb 1878 22 m KS Ger NY dressmaker

  74. Census, Federal - 1910 - Wasco Co., Oregon. East Dalles, ED # 302; Ancestry p. 3 of 14.

    Line 27 Dwelling 153 Household 165

    Wintermantel, William Head age 71 m. 43 yrs Ger Ger Ger occ: none Home owned
    Sarah A. wife 64 m 43 yrs 8ch b./ 4 living NY Ger Ger none

  75. Census, Special, of Civil War veterans and widows - 1890, Oregon, Multnomah, Fulton; p. 2 of 2.

    Line 23 212 217 Wintermantel, William corporal F company 3rd Wis Cavalry enlist: 18 Jan 1862

    dischrg 16 Mar 1865; length of service 3 yrs 1 mos 28 das

  76. Christian Wintermantel Pension Papers, p. 59 - testimony of Wm Wintermantel.

    59 – 4Feb1903 – William Wintermantel – brother – lives in Bingen, Wash.
    60 – WWcont - “(Christian) came to Oregon the year...the Northern Pacific R.R. was opened. I think in October...It was in 1883 he came out here. He stayed with me that winter.”
    61 – WWcont – describes how he and Christian moved to Iowa together and lived together until 1874 when WW went to Kansas, then on to Oregon in 1878. Christian followed him to Oregon. “When he was first home from the army he was pretty badly run down. He was just skin and bone.”
    62 - WWcont - In Iowa started coughing and spitting blood whenever doing hard work. “In 1886 we took a trip east of the mountains and then his coughing irritated me so much at night that I offered him $5 to stop it and he got angry. That cough hung to him and kept getting worse until it killed him.”
    63 – WWcont – treatment for rheumatism in army, rheumatism in Iowa, none in Oregon
    64 – WWcont – Feys and Wintermantels lived four miles apart in Sauk County

  77. Letter from George Wintermantle to relatives in Germany (from papers received from Paul Wintermantel via Patsy Clark; June 2003).

    Brother William enlisted in the army in the beginning of the war. He served 3 years in the 3rd Wisconsin Cavalry Regiment, mostly under General Bloncl in the southwest, in Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas and in Indian Territory. He was in many battles and bloody situations, and in danger day and night between southern rebels and enemy Indians. In 1865 he moved with John Jacob to Iowa where he bought and sold farms several times, naturally not without profit. But two years ago he moved to Kansas where he again acquired 160 acres of land. Probably, according to law, every soldier with an honorable discharge was entitled to 160 acres of land. He sold a farm in Iowa, I think it was 730 acres. His wife was a daughter of a German preacher from Illinois.

  78. Census, Federal - 1900 - Multnomah Co, city of Portland, Precinct 80, West Portland ED98, p. 7B.
  79. Jan Bender, Patsy Clark, Julie Edwards, and Margaret Ann Jenstad; about 2002, Descendants of John Jacob Wintermantel.
  80. Ibid.
  81. edited by Glazier and Filby, Germans to America, vol 10 p. 88.
  82. Census, Federal - 1860 - Sauk Co, WI, Township of Franklin, Post Office White Mound (near Plain), Ancestry p. 9 of 14.

    line 30 dwelling 1206 household #1187

    Wintermantel, Jacob age 61 farmer value RE $400 born Baden
    Salome 60 Baden
    John Jacob 32 butcher Baden
    Mary 28 "
    William 22 "
    Rosa 18 in school "
    Christian 16 in school "

  83. Jan Bender, Patsy Clark, Julie Edwards, and Margaret Ann Jenstad; about 2002, Descendants of John Jacob Wintermantel.
  84. Letter from George Wintermantle to relatives in Germany (from papers received from Paul Wintermantel via Patsy Clark; June 2003).

    Sister Rosina was married in October, 1861, and lives in Minnesota since 1865. This state is west of Wisconsin. And the place where Rosina lives with her husband, Paul Heiz, is probably 300 miles from here.

  85. Census, Federal 1910, Hutchinson Ward 3, McLeod, Minnesota.

    Name: Rosina Heitz

    Age in 1910: 68
    Birth Year: abt 1842
    Birthplace: Germany
    Home in 1910: Hutchinson Ward 3, McLeod, Minnesota
    Race: White
    Gender: Female
    Immigration Year: 1865
    Relation to Head of House: Wife
    Marital Status: Married
    Spouse's Name: Paul Heitz
    Father's Birthplace: Germany
    Mother's Birthplace: Germany
    Neighbors: View others on page
    Household Members: Name Age
    Paul Heitz 71
    Rosina Heitz 68
    Edith Heitz 26

  86. Patsy Clark Email.
    (17 Mar 2004)
  87. Civil War Certificate from WI State Historical Society.

    Certificate of Service

    Wisconsin Civil War Service

    Christian Wintermantle

    The Official Record: Entered Service August 20, 1862. Enlisted into Company K Twentysixth Wisconsin Infantry from Franklin, Wisconsin. Corporal; Mustered out out of service June 13, 1865.

    Engagements

    Chancellorsville, VA
    Gettysburg, PA
    Funkstown, MD
    Wauhatchie, TN
    Missionary Ridge, TN
    Buzzard Roost Gap, GA
    Resaca, GA
    New Hope Church, GA
    Golgotha Church, GA
    Nose's Creek, GA
    Kenesaw Mountain, GA
    Peach Tree Creek, GA
    Seige of Atlanta, GA
    Seige of Savannah, GA
    Averasboro, NC
    Bentonville, NC

    Twentysixth Infantry. The Twentysixth Infantry regiment was Organized at Camp Sigel, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and mustered into service of the United States on the 17th day of September, 1862. It left the state October6 and proceeded directly to Washington, D.C. The regiment moved to Fairfax Court House, VA, October 15 and was assigned to service inthe Eleventh Army Corps. It was among the reserve force at Fredericksburg, VA December 15, 1862, and participated in the Chancellorsville, VA Campaign Apr 27-May 6, 1863, and in the battle of Chancellorsville May 1-3. it was engaged in the Gettysburg Campaign June 11-July 4, and in the battle of Gettysburg July 1-3, 1863. In September 1863, the Twentysixth was transferred to the Army in middle Tennessee in the vicinity of Chattanooga, and participated in the battle of Wauhatchie near Lookout Mountain, TN Oct 28-29;
    Missionary Ridge, November 25 and in the movement for the relief of Knoxville November 27 to December 8, 1863.
    On the reorganization of the Army of the Cumberland in 1864 and prior to the Atlanta Campaign the Twentysixth was assigned to the Twentieth Army Corps, and continued a part of the army under Gen. Sherman, participating in the Atlanta Campaign May1-Sept 8, 1864, Savannah Campaign Nov 15 to Dec 21, 1864, and the Campaign in the Carolinas, and after the surrender of the Confederates under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston near Raliegh, N.C., Apr 26, 1865, marched to Washington and took part in the Grand Review. The regiment was mustered out of service Jun 13, 1865. It reached Milwaukee Jun 17, 1865 and was disbanded Jun 29, 1865.

  88. Wintermantle, Christian-Journal kept on trip from WI to OR 9/26/1883 translation by Marcel Rotter May 2005.


    On my journey (meditations)
    At 20:20, we left Geneva. In Mason City Junction, we changed cars. We arrived in St. Paul at 7 PM. We stayed in a hotel. It cost us $7.25 for soups and breakfast. At 8:30 in the morning, we were boarding the Emegrand Train [Emigrant train?] and now we are traveling N. West through wide open, very beautiful land, black sandy soil with [??]underwood and [?? ??] marshland with rotten wood. The grass is approximately 4 foot high here. We just passed a huge pond. This pond is one of the [??] that I ever visited [means probably “saw”]. Another crops field, almost [??] [??]

    [2a]
    I just saw a pine on the left [?? ?? ??]
    Parham - nice area; the other deserts were all the same -all Sand. [?? ?? ??] Yesterday we were in Mandan until the evening. This morning, we crossed the central Missouri. We stopped at a station in Dakota. They call the land The Bad Lands. [?? ?? ??]

    [2b]
    Monday 10 am
    10 am we crossed the line between Dakota and Montana. The land is better. Still more than 1,000 miles to Portland. The buffalo grass is all white now; now we go towards the Stone river to the west; it’s strange how [??] the land is. …Yellowstone … the surrounding mountains with the coal are visible. We are going 20-30 miles per hour behind an Express Tradet Train I bought land for 1 Th [=Thaler] at the value of 50 cents compared to yesterday’s land for $135

    [3a]
    The soil of this desert seems to be empty. One can see villages or single dwellings only rarely. The last night, we made only 125 miles. We just passed a snowy mountain. The Yellowstone River is still on our right. We went through a tunnel in a high mountain. The Yellowstone Valley is very pretty, but not good for farming. The [?? ?? ??] has a child [?? ??] in our car. 3 PM - we are following the Yellowstone river. The weather is nice. The far away mountains are covered with snow.

    [3b]
    This area is somewhat inhabited. We are passing high grass and potatoes in a garden as well as a chained bear. We are now halfway from St. Paul to Portland. Today, I bought again land for $1. Now it snows again. We just saw an Indian camp with a ranch. The strange thing about this desert is how the nutrition[??] let the grass grow: buffalo grass, Pinsh[?]grass, which has [??] instead of fruit. Some Indians just came by on horses. Edon station, evening. It snows, the ground is white. Today, we climbed [by train] over a chain of mountains. From 118 feet on all the way up to the top were 2 inches of snow on the ground.


    [4a]

    Now, we are at in the station Juwesand, where very pretty farms are. 20 ar [=German agricultural measurement] of wheat in heaps and additional 100 of oats. But everything has to be irrigated. We always see the snow-covered mountains. It is cold, the water [=lakes, ponds] has ice on top, and the ground is frozen. Last night, two cracks broke. It is dangerous. At times, we are passing rocks that hang over 100 feet high over the cars. Today, October 10, we are in Helen. An old place, where they do mining. Now, we have to go over the Kedloy[?] mountains. The mountains are white, no snow in the valley.


    [4b]

    The whole sale at auction brought
    $153663
    Discount $ 7433
    146230

    Hammer 284.73, for the tickets
    for the auctions 2804
    Duts [name?] 150
    Releas 50
    for Glaken $10.00
    Ghetty $ 1:50

    1462.30
    338.33
    1123.67
    295.85 the Nob to Kirby [names?]


    [5a]

    ¼ to 3, we just left Helene, we go between the high forelands of the Rocky Mountains. After 16 miles, we made it. We just arrived on top of the Rocky Mountains, the fifth place in the United States. This road is a miracle to walk on. From now on, the waters run westward. We are now on the Pikes Pecks, 5773 feet above sea level. From the foot of the mountains up to here, we climbed 1000 feet, 26 feet the mile. We should [??] more. Now, 8 PM, we are going [?? ?? ??] 11 October; today we are still in good health. Last night, we [??] movement [?? ??] over ..,

    [5b]

    … 100 miles down. At 4 PM, we passed the highest bridge of the road; 216 feet high. One lane wide. We are now going from Clark Fork alongside Lonegarb[?]. On both sides large mountains covered with pine trees. There are, for example, bears, elks, and stags in this area. We passed [??]. There, the [??]wood stands over 100 foot high, and higher. [?? ?? ??] Now, we have been going for 30 miles along the L pond. It’s supposed to be 40 miles long. There is a steam boat that transports wood to the mills.


    [6]

    Thursday, October 12, 9 am. We are now in the W[estern] Terr[itory] and go towards the Cascade Mountains. For hundreds of miles is nothing but sand - a desert. The water is warm and beautiful. In the distance, we see a mountain with yesterday’s snow. 12 noon in Ainsworth, our train is being carried over the Snackriver [=Snake river] by a train boat. Now, at ½ 3, we are leaving Wallela. Only one more night and one more day, and we are in Portland. Here is a sandy desert, where the wind blows the sand into the houses. Just like in Iowa the snow. Today, it is very warm.


    [7]

    Index
    Years old
    Rosina September 26/ 83 17
    Mathilde 15
    Willy 13
    Albert 12
    Hedwig 10
    Herman [?] 8
    Emilie 6
    Luise 4
    Minna 2
    Clara 1


    [8a]

    the taxation of the class for 1883
    the income of the preachers $100
    the odd jobs 25



    [8b]

    income for the presiding elder at the camp meeting

    from brother Altstadt 50
    -- -- Britz 50
    -- -- Henrichs 50
    -- -- Rubb 25
    widower Reicko 50
    broth. Osterland 1.00
    Werter Fischer 1.00
    John Knoll 50
    brother Hennrichs 50
    brother Altstadt 50



    [9a]

    Index of Income of the Preacher for 1883

    Widow Reicko $2.00
    Broth. J. Knoll $5.00
    Brother Hennrichs $5.00
    Chris Wintermantel $7.00
    10 for bread 90
    11 -- -- 50
    the 12 of October 1.00
    the 13 of October 85


    [9b]

    The apprentice of Mr. Haufa worked 3 days until April 12 .".

    [The original journal is a small lined notebook 3 ½ in. X 5 ½ in. It has 28 pages (times 2 sides each = 56). Most of them are blank. It is written in German script in pencil. The original writing was scarcely legible. The pencil marks have deteriorated over the past 130 years. I paid twice to have it translated, the first time by Renata Schwertyl in 1976, the second time by Marcel Rotter in May 2005. This is the one by Dr. Marcel Rotter, Associate Professor of German at the University of Mary Washington in Virginia.
    p. 4b - figures from leaving Iowa, some decimal points missing
    p. 7 - a list of his children and their ages shortly before leaving Iowa
    p. 8b & 9a - Iowa chuch figures. John Knoll gave testimony in Christian's Pension file. He stated he knew Christian in Ackley Iowa.]

  89. Wintermantle, Christian- Resolutions of Respect from the Warner Grange., Wintermantle.

    [See front and back of envelope in CW Multimedia File]

  90. edited by Glazier and Filby, Germans to America, vol 10, p. 88.
  91. Census, Federal - 1860 - Sauk Co, WI, Township of Franklin, Post Office White Mound (near Plain), Ancestry p. 9 of 14.

    line 30 dwelling 1206 household #1187

    Wintermantel, Jacob age 61 farmer value RE $400 born Baden
    Salome 60 Baden
    John Jacob 32 butcher Baden
    Mary 28 "
    William 22 "
    Rosa 18 in school "
    Christian 16 in school "

  92. Census, Federal - 1870 - Madison Co, IA, Webster TWsp, PO Winterset, Ancestry p. 11 of 13.

    Line 31 Dwelling # 75 Family # 76

    Wintermantel, Wm age 31 Farmer born Baden
    Sarah 21 NY


    Family # 77

    Wintermantel, Shristian age 27 Farm Laborer born Baden
    Matilda 28 Prussia
    Rosena 3 WI
    Matilda 2 WI
    William 7/12 IA

  93. Census, Federal - 1880 - Franklin Co., Iowa, Geneva Twsp, Ancestry p. 5.
    (4 Jun 1880)

    line 33 Dwelling 33 Household 34

    Wintermantel, Christian age 38 Farmer Baden Baden Baden
    Matilda 35 wife Prussia Prussia Prussia
    Rose 13 dau WI Baden Prussia
    Matilda 12 dau same
    William 10 son IA Baden Prussia
    Albert 8 son same
    Hedwig 7 dau same
    Herman 5 son same
    Amelia 3 dau same
    Louisa 1 dau same

  94. Wintermantle, Minnie, note.

    [This is a brief note left by Minnie.]

  95. Visiting Zion (City of Canby, Oregon website : <http://www.ci.canby.or.us/Departments/cemetery/Cemeterynews.htm>).

    Visiting Zion
    Located on South Township Road just before the South Walnut Street crossroad is Zion Memorial Cemetery and Mausoleum. The property covers about 20 acres, 11 of which are developed. The old section is mostly filled and now there are only infrequent burials in remaining family plots. The new section is currently being used and has been added to over the years with growth to the north and east and a new mausoleum was dedicated in 1989. Groundbreaking has just begun on a companion mausoleum that will mirror the existing building and it is hoped to be completed by Memorial Day of 2002. The cemetery is over one hundred years old, organized by the Zion Cemetery Association in January of 1897. The first burial was that of Christian Wintermantel, the individual who originally proposed the cemetery on January 19, 1897. The cemetery was owned by the Canb6 Evangelical United Brethren Church until it became too labor-intensive to maintain, and was handed over to the City in 1937. Rules and regulations were adopted on January 10, 1938 and it has remained in City hands since that time. A fire destroyed some of the paperwork and over the years, the City has reconstructed the records.
    Our present sexton, Ken Robinson of KR Maintenance, is on duty full time at Zion. He has reestablished the Memorial Gardens and has added a lovely waterfall and reflection pond with benches for quiet mediation. He has been diligent to mow, prune, paint, remove damaged trees, and open up areas that have been overgrown. For the past four years, has has planted a garden and shares his harvest with some of Zion's frequent visitors who sill long for fresh produce, but can not longer plant a garden of their own; The area even attracts picnickers. Please call Mr. Robinson at 503-266-8480 if your are interested in locating relatives, purchasing property, or just viewing the premises.

  96. Marcel Rotter Email.
    (5 Jul 2005)

    Dear Dianne,
    I have returned to Fredericksburg and have not forgotten your question.
    My little research suggests that your relative was probably not in the
    battle here. The following website
    says "The weather
    squelched their opportunity to fight at Fredricksburg, Virginia in
    December of 1862. The spring of the following year was the first battle
    for the 26th Wisconsin, which took place at Chancellorsville, Virginia.
    " This was another important battle about an hour from here.
    The troops involved in the river crossing were from the 19th and 20th
    Massachusettes and the 7th Michigan. The 93 dead people came from the
    20th Massachusettes.
    Hope that helps.
    Marcel
    Dr. Marcel Rotter
    Assistant Professor of German
    Department of Modern Foreign Languages
    University of Mary Washington
    219 Combs Hall
    1301 College Ave.
    Fredericksburg, VA 22401
    Telephone: 540.654.1996Email: mrotter@umw.edu

    [This correspondence was in regard to whether or not Christian was actually in the battle of Fredricksburg.]

  97. Census, Special, of Civil War veterans and widows - 1890, Oregon, Marion, Jefferson; p. 1 of 2.

    Line 3 44 44 Christian Wintermantle private Co K 26th Wis Infantry enlisted 20 Aug 1862

    discharged 28 Jun 1865 length of service 2 yrs 10 mos 8 das

  98. Wisconsin Veterans Museum (http://museum.dva.state.wi.us/CivilWar/Soldiers.aspx).

    WINTERMANTLE, CHRISTIAN ENLISTED 8/20/1862 6/13/1865
    CORPORAL
    MUSTERED OUT OF SERVICE JUNE 13, 1865.

    FRANKLIN 26TH WIS. INFANTRY, CO. K

  99. Christian Wintermantel Pension Papers, Summary.
    (from 25 Jun 1889 to 4 Sep 1922)

    Christian Wintermantel Pension Papers – Summary

    page

    1a – 25Jun1889 – Declaration for an Invalid Person – Christian Wintermantel testifies that during the Siege of Atlanta he contracted severe and chronic Rheumatism from exposure, and during the march through North Carolina contracted bronchitis through exposure in the line of duty.

    1b – 6FEB1890 - Medical record
    21 Jan 1863 – 20 Feb 1863 Pleurisy
    19 Dec 1863 – 5 Jan 1864 Typhoid Fever
    20 Nov 1864 - 18 Dec 1864 Chronic Rheumatism
    31 Dec 1864 – 10 Jan 1865 Chronic Rheumatism

    promoted to Corporal 13 Jun 1865

    after his round of Pleurisy (above) he was returned to duty as “Christian Winterman”

    2 – 27May 1890 - Testimony of John P. Witwen. He was with Christian during Sherman's march through Georgia. CW, at that time was taken by ambulance to the field hospital because of rheumatism.

    3 – 30 May 1890 - Testimony of Theobald Fuchs who was CW's corporal at Gettysburg and at Lookout Mountain, TN. Describes how he “carried his musket and led him along.”

    4 – 12 July 1890 – Testimony of CW affirming he is CW. He needs pension because he is unable to work because of rheumatism and catarrh. His disability is not the result of his own “vicious habits.”

    5 – No Date - Physicians Affadavit – tended CW during war. He suffers from rheumatism and catarrh.
    6 – 6Feb1895 – Application for Pension Increase. States CW currently receives 8 per month. He suffers from rheumatism and bronchaitis catarrh. He has pain in shoulder and chest. He expectorates blood and pus. One half his chest is larger than the other.
    7 – Continuation of 6.
    8 – 12Apr1897 – Testimony of Matilda Wintermantle (MW) that CW died on 19Jan1897. MW is CW's widow and accrued pension of $8 per month has not been paid to her.
    9- 12Apr1897 – Claim for Accrued Pension – Testimony of George Wintermantel (brother of CW) – he was present at the wedding of C & MW on 9Nov1865.
    9B - 12APR1897 - misc page signed by H.C. Weber (Husband of MW's daughter Matilda) and H. E. Hornschuh (Brother-in-law to MW's daughter Amelia) – supporting MW
    10 – 17Apr1897 – Application of MW for widow's pension.
    11 – 1Jun1897 – testimony of William Wintermantel, brother to CW, witnessing to lawful marriage of CW and Matilda Fey (MW).
    12 – 25Jun1897 – Testimony of John M. Hammetter that he performed the marriage ceremony for CW and MW
    13 – 12Apr1899 – copy of marriage certificate of CW and MW
    14 – 22May1899 - Certification of property in Marion Co., OR CW owns 640 acres of land assessed at $2841, real value $8500
    15 – 15Jun1899 - Thomas P. Randall, Recorder of Conveyances, Clackamas County, Oregon – Assessed value of property in said county for taxation purpose is: 38 acres tillable land and 48 acres non-tillable together valued at $860, improvements at $150, personal property including livestock $175.
    16 – 15Jun1899 - Testimony of Matilda Wintermantel – discusses problems related to proof of birth of her two underage daughters. There are no official records.
    17 - #16 continued
    18 – 15Jun1899 - Testimony of Kate Knoll, neighbor of MW in Hardin Co, Iowa, infant named Clara Wintermantel was born about 28 Oct 1882.
    19 – Copy of certificate of marriage of Christian Wintermantel and Matilda Fey.
    20 – 16Mar1900 – Declaration for children under sixteen years of age – It appears Matilda is applying for a pension for her children who were under age 16 when their father died.
    21 – 4Apr 1900 – statement from MW of when she first saw CW after war – what were his problems – Did they continue. - MW replies he complained about “his brest and caufe.” She also states they moved to Oregon because of his health.
    22 – 4Apr1900 – Affidavit from William Wintermantel (brother of CW) – CW had rheumatism immediately after war and stomach complaint. He improved for 1 and ½ yrs then went downhill. He was one half disabled, had hacking cough and spit blood.
    23 – 12Apr1900 – statement from Dr.White – He examined CW in Canby, OR in Oct 1896 – Found bronchial and lung problems, “expectorated freely”, became emaciated, expired in Jan of exhaustion and “consumption of the lungs.”
    24 – 27Mar1901- Affidavit by MW about the ages of her dependent children
    25 – copy of William Druschel and Matilda Wintermantel Marriage Certificate
    26 – 30Sep1901 – Matilda Druschel appointed guardian for Ellen C. Wintermantel
    27 – 30Mar1901 – Matilda verifies she has married and birth dates of minor children
    28 – 5Apr1901 - Testimony of Adam Ehret – Ella and Clara were under 16 at time of father's death
    29 – 25Jan1902 - Matilda Druschel swears to spelling of her name
    30 – 5Mar1902 – Matilda Druschel testifies CW did not consult a physician because he had little faith in doctors. Instead he used his own remedies, patent medicines or those recommended by friends.
    31 – 19Jan1903 - Testimony of Matilda Druschel – when she knew CW, about his service record
    32 – MD cont – Her application of 5 years ago was rejected because she had too much property.
    33 – MD cont – refers to a German Bible where dates of children's births are written
    34 – MD cont – witness to births of Clara and Ella, At date of death CW left property: 490 acres of land near Jefferson, OR; 80 acres at Canby; Will left all property to MW;”130 acres of the property at Jefferson was under cultivation. I rented that for 1/3 of the crop. On average I would get 300 bu wheat 50cents/bu and 100bu oats 30 cents/bu. This place I worked myself for the first few years. There was about 40 acres under cultivation. I have since sold most of it. My taxes were on both places about $70 - $80 per year. No insurance. There was indebtedness of $2600 with interest of 7 and 8%. No other property except few head of stock, farming implements, and household goods... No money in bank or investments of any kind.”
    35 – MD cont – CW confined to bed last 3 mos of life – describes final weeks – had to keep windows open in January because of the foul odor.
    36 – MD cont – CW disabilities during war – who were his comrades
    37 – MD cont – first met CW 4Jul 1865; married Nov 1865; lived three years in Franklin, Sauk, WI;moved to Wintersett,Madison Co, Iowa fall of 1868;moved to Wintersett,Madison Co, Iowa fall of 1868; moved to Ackley, Hardin Co, Iowa spring 1872; moved to Jefferson, OR fall of 1883; Clara was 1 yr old; one year later Ella was born; moved to Canby 11 yrs ago (1892?)
    38 – MD cont – No written record of Clara or Ella's birth; there is a baptismal certif for Ella.
    39 – MD cont – how rheumatism affected CW after his marriage and in Iowa
    40 – MD cont – describes CW's cough
    41 – MD cont – had scarlet fever and dropsy when first in OR; first spit blood in Iowa and ever afterward
    42 – MD cont – who knew of CW's condition and when did they know it
    43 – MD final – sometimes eyes were yellow.
    44 – 19Jan1903 – Ella C. Wintermantel – CW's pension $8/mo; much coughing and spitting from consumption
    45 – ECW cont – How do you know how old you are?
    46 – 20Jan1903 – Matilda Buckner, neighbor in Jefferson, OR – A daughter was born while they lived here.
    47 – 20Jan1903 – Mrs. C. C. Marlatt, neighbor in Jefferson, present at the birth of Ella
    48 – CCM cont – how do I know when this happened
    49 – CCM cont – CW appeared in good health while here, did lots of hard work, had a hacking cough
    50 – CCM cont – CW's health in Jeffersonh; conflicting testimony over Ella's birth
    51 – 20Jan1903 – RP Nye, Jefferson neighbor – date of Ella's birth
    52 – RPN cont – CW's health – don't recall him being sick, was always working
    53 – 20Jan1903 – Dr. W.C.Hawk – treated CW in Jefferson, did not keep record
    54 – CWHcont – called CW's condition advanced TB
    55 – 1/23/1903 – Clara Wintermantel – Didn't know what was wrong with Dad, thought maybe he had a stomach tumor or cancer
    56 – Clara cont – How do you know how old you are
    57 – Clara cont – How do you know how old you are continuation
    58 – Clara cont – He always had a cough. Don't know what caused death of CW.
    59 – 4Feb1903 – William Wintermantel – brother – lives in Bingen, Wash.
    60 – WWcont - “(Christian) came to Oregon the year...the Northern Pacific R.R. was opened. I think in October...It was in 1883 he came out here. He stayed with me that winter.”
    61 – WWcont – describes how he and Christian moved to Iowa together and lived together until 1874 when WW went to Kansas, then on to Oregon in 1878. Christian followed him to Oregon. “When he was first home from the army he was pretty badly run down. He was just skin and bone.”
    62 - WWcont - In Iowa started coughing and spitting blood whenever doing hard work. “In 1886 we took a trip east of the mountains and then his coughinjg irritated me so much at night that I offered him $5 to stop it and he got angry. That cough hung to him and kept getting worse until it killed him.”
    63 – WWcont – treatment for rheumatism in army, rheumatism in Iowa, none in Oregon
    64 – WWcont – Feys and Wintermantels lived four miles apart in Sauk County
    65 – 4Sep1903 – Peter Smeller – knew CW since 12 years old – served in army together – very sick winter 1862-63, in his chest – spit blood.
    66 – PeterS cont
    67 – 19Oct1803 – John Knoll – neighbor from Ackley,Iowa – CW said he got rheumatism from laying out in the rain in fields while in army. Got his cough after having lung fever.
    68 – 19Oct1903 – Margaretha Hendricks – neighbor Ackley, Iowa – When Clara was born CW complained of rheumatism
    69 – 11Dec1903 – Dr Simon VanDerVaart – surgeon of the 26th WI Volunteer infantry – does not remember CW
    70 – Dr SVDVcont
    71 – 18Mar1904 – Henry Nolt – Sgt CW's company and Sauk Co neighbor – same church -During Sherman's march CW was in bad shape, walked all doubled up, marched with a stoop thereafter
    72 – HNcont
    73 – 2Apr1904 – someone in Waco, Texas (Signature is illegible) - Letter submitting the above evidence in pension claim for guardianship of the minor children of CW.
    74 – above cont
    75 – 5May1904 – Mrs. Dina A. Belzer (as a small child was a friend of CW's children and frequently in their home) – “He was sickly and stoop shouldered and looked to me as though he might have consumption...Neighbors used to speak of him as a man who was broken down as though it came from being in the war.”
    76 – DAB cont
    77 – 13Jan1905 – Dept of Interior – Matilda druschel was appointed guardian of minor children on 3Sep1901
    78 – 19Jun1913 – William Wintermantel - document written in German. WW submits it as a transcript of his family record verifying his birth
    79 – above cont.
    80 - 9Jul1913 – translation of part of #78 above as it pertains to the birth of William Wintermantel
    81 – 15Feb1917 – copy of Oregon death record for William Druschel.
    82 – 17Jul 1913 – Herbert Cochran – letter to Pension board asking if MD is eligible for pension again as CW's widow since WD (2nd husband) has died. Spells out these details:
    CW drew a pension starting sometime after war until his death.
    After CW's death, MW drew a widow's pension until she married WD
    WD has now died. Is MD (formerly MW) again entitled to a pension?
    83 – 18Apr1918 – MD to Hon. C. N. M. Carthur – two years ago I applied to renew my pension with no results. Now they tell me I must submit the same paper work all over again. Can you please help me?
    84 – 8May1918 – MD to Commissioner of pensions – biographical facts. Also tells where MD has lived since Druschel's death, 22Jun1907:
    Jun 1907 – Mar 1908 – Canby, OR
    Mar 1908 – Mar 1910 – Seattle, WA
    Tacoma, WA – one year
    N. Yakima, WA – one year
    Tacoma, WA – 2 yrs
    then Portland, OR until Dec 1917
    Dec 1917 – now - Canby, OR
    85 – 6SEP1922 – Mrs. John W. Koehler (MD's daughter Louisa) to Bureau of pensions: Matilda Drushel, holder of pension #577405 passed away on 2 JUL 1922
    86 – 4SEP1922 – Bureau of Pensions – Drop Report – states MD's pension was $30/mo at end

  100. Canby.
  101. Letter from George Wintermantle to relatives in Germany (from papers received from Paul Wintermantel via Patsy Clark; June 2003).

    Brother Christian was also in the war. He served in the 26th Wisconsin Infantry Regiment He was in some of the largest battles of the whole war, near Fredricksburg and Chancellorsville in Virginia and at Gettysburg in Pennsylvania. He endured earthshaking cannon fire, he saw blood flow in streams in larger and smaller battles. After his three years of service in the army he came back home from the war unhurt. After the war he married Mathilda Fei who came with her parents from Prussia to America. In 1867 he sowed 2 acres of hops on Father's land and made more than a thousand dollars from the hops. In the fall of 1868 he moved to the other brothers in Iowa.

    Iowa, our western neighbor state, draws the people there because there it is not necessary to make a farm out of woodland like in Wisconsin, in most cases, for there on the large prairies you can see only heaven and grass for hundreds of miles. There the settlers can prepare 40, 50 or 60 acres of the nicest and fattest land with the break-plow and two teams of horses in one summer, and harvest 800, 1000 or 1500 bushels of wheat the next summer, and so with one stroke come to easy street. Of course, it does not always go so -well, but it does in many cases. The harvesting as well as the sowing and threshing is done with machines. Ten horses (5 teams) and 12 to 14 men are used for threshing when the grain and weather are dry, and 400 to 500 bushels of wheat or 700 bushels of oats can be threshed in one day, and in most cases, so well cleaned that it can be taken to the mill or to the market. Of course, the grain is cheap in the west and the workers wages are high. From myself, I cannot report such famous deeds and thrilling experiences.

  102. Patsy Clark Email of 5 Feb 2004 to Dianne Stevens, part C.

    Christian and Matilda are buried in Zion Cemetery just out of Canby, Oregon. Christian was the first buried there which had been a corner of his farm land, along with corners of three other farms, set aside for the purpose of a new cemetery. This was the result of a Presbyterian woman having been buried alongside a German Evangelical pastor. This was when a fireworks display started without the need for fireworks nor matches.
    The Germans, at least at that time, were a very clannish group. That is to say, “We will all speak German in our schools and churches, all our sons and daughters will marry only to Germans and will all be very happy ever after.” (Or until further notice.)
    “Further notice” came one day in 1895 when son Albert decided to fall in love and marry a pretty little auburn haired Scottish girl by the name of Eva Verna Bickal. As a result of this union, she was by most of the family treated as an outcast. There were three of his siblings
    she did manage to befriend.
    Albert (granddad), being somewhat of a young rebel, tired of what he found was happening, decided to remove an edge of the German stigma by changing ever so slightly the spelling of his last name. Others around him were told that, “In the presence of my wife, we will speak English.”

    [A forwarded email from Earl Wash, descendant of Albert Wintermantel]

  103. Jan Bender, Patsy Clark, Julie Edwards, and Margaret Ann Jenstad; about 2002, Descendants of John Jacob Wintermantel.
  104. Christian Wintermantel Pension Papers.
Surnames | Index

Revised: November 26, 2016