Husband: William Wesley White (1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8)
Born: 06 May 1864 in Apple River, Jo Daviess, Illinois
Married: 16 Mar 1899 in Platteville, Grant CO, WI (39)
Died: 21 Nov 1948 in South Fork, Howell, MO
Father: William L. White
Mother: Ellen Faragher
Spouses:
Wife: Anna Adelaide Nicklas (10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17)
Born: 20 Nov 1871 in Georgetown, Grant, WI
Died: 22 May 1951 in Christa Hogan Hospital, West Plains, Howell, MO (18)
Father: Peter Benjamin Nicklas
Mother: Doratha L. Harriet Schlucke
Spouses:
Children
01 (M): Wilbur L. White (20 21 22 23)
Born: 03 Mar 1900 in Apple River, Jo Daviess, Illinois
Died: Jun 1923 in Dona Ana County, New Mexico
Spouses:
02 (F): Dorothy Ellen White (24 25 26 27 28)
Born: 25 Dec 1902 in Apple River, IL
Died: 01 Jan 1990 in Rifle, Garfield, CO
Spouses:
03 (M): Philip Love White (29 30 31 32 33)
Born: 23 Aug 1904 in Apple River, Jo Daviess, Illinois
Died: 15 May 1999 in Brownwood, Brown, TX
Spouses: Ezra Edna Grimes
04 (F): Helen Frances White (34 35 36 37 38)
Born: 22 Feb 1906 in Apple River, Jo Daviess, Illinois
Died: 16 Aug 2002 in Waukegan, Lake, IL
Spouses: Harold Balis Stevens; Alvar Romppainen
Additional Information

William Wesley White:

Cause of Death: Pneumonia

Buried: 24 Nov 1948, Amy Cemetery, Howell County, Missouri 9

Notes:

The William Wesly White Story
6 May 1864 - 21 Nov 1948


28 March 2007

Dear Children,

Tonight I want to tell you about Grandpa Stevens' Grandpa White.

William Wesley White grew up in beautiful Jo Daviess County, Illinois. He was the third in a family of nine children. The Whites were a well established, industrious farm family and instilled in their children a love of learning and an ardent religious leaning. Wes, as he was called, was fortunate to be able to attend college. He attended Illinois Normal, acquiring the credentials necessary to teach school and he taught in Platteville, Wisconsin. Wes had four brothers and sisters that taught school as well. Platteville is where he met his wife Anna Adelaide Nicklas. She was one of his students and was six years younger than he. Addie's story says her parents sent her to school in Platteville and she became so homesick she had to go back home. It would be very interesting to know exactly how that romance developed. We know it did develop because Wes and Addie married 16 Mar 1899 in Platteville.

The 1900 census shows Wes and Addie living in Rush Twsp, Jo Daviess County in the same house with Addie's parents and sister. The census says Wes is a farmer and he owns the home, not his father-in-law Peter. Helen always said the 4 children were all born on the farm where Wes grew up at Apple River, but it appears at least Wilbur was not. Perhaps they moved there after Peter Nicklas died in 1904. Anyway, the family lived at or near the farm at Apple River until 1908. All four children were born there or near there; Dorothy Ellen on Christmas Day in 1902. (Some people have a penchant for holidays. Dorothy Ellen died on New Years Day, 87 years later.) Philip in August of 1904, and Helen on 22 February 1906.

Two things happened in 1908 that affected the family's future. Addie developed a condition in her face called neuritis and was advised to move to a warmer climate. Wes's father, William L. White, was close to 70. He was tired. He did not want to farm anymore. So William L. sold the family farm and moved to town with his wife and daughter Annie, and Wes and Addie and their four kids moved to Midlothian, Virginia in Chesterfield County, near Richmond. I wonder why they chose Virginia. Wesley was an excellent farmer. Before long he owned two farms. One good cash crop they produced was strawberries. For extra money, the family cut down and sold pulp wood. The family appears on the 1910 and the 1920 censuses in Chesterfield County, township of Midlothian, Virginia.

Wesley did many things a little differently from his neighbors. Out of an old waogn wheel he made his kids a merry-go-round, which they loved to play on. They had one of the very early victrolas on which they played records by Sousa and Galley Kirchey. Wes was an amateur photographer. He enjoyed taking pictures and developing them, a progressive hobby for his day. And we have copies of many of the photos he took, including one of the four children playing on the wagon wheel merry-go-round.

Wes was an avid reader. The Reader's Digest was one of the few sources of reading material available. Like his brothers and sisters, Wes firmly believed in the value of education. Helen had warm memories of the whole family sitting around the kitchen table in the evening with everyone reading or doing schoolwork. He counselled his children to do their best in life and not to worry so much about competing with others. And he told them, "If you ever have troubles, come home with them. That's where help is."

When Helen was 17, she, her mother, Phillip, and Wilbur went to New Mexico because Wilbur had TB and the wet Virginia climate was bad for him. TB is short for Tuberculosis, a very serious bacterial disease of the lungs. Another name for it in olden days was Consumption. It was very common and very deadly in the days before antibiotics. Many people felt a warm dry climate was the best environment for an individual with TB.

But it was too late for Wilbur. He died there of TB a few months later. Mrs. White refused to come back to Virginia, so the family was forced to sell their nice farm and move to New Mexico where it was extremely hard for Wesley to make a living. In retrospect Helen realized it was a blessing the family moved to the southwest because both she and Phillip had developed TB, though no one knew at the time. Wes built his family a lovely home of stone. It was covered with ivy which was irrigated.

The 1930 census shows the White family in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. Wes is working as a general farmer, he owns his own home valued at $350. Philip is working as a farm laborer, Helen as a public school teacher, and Dorothy has been unemployed for 3 months, but lists Furniture store Stenographer as her occupation.

In 1935, when he was 70 years old, Wes, Addie, and daughter Dorothy moved to South Fork, Howell County, Missouri. There they bought a cheaper farm. Unfortunately, the soil was very poor and it was hard to make a living. On top of that it was the Depression and everyone was poor. South Fork is near West Plains in south central Missouri, near the border with Arkansas.

Paul remembers visiting his grandparents there. He says their farm was quite primitive. They had a pot bellied wood stove in the living room that provided heat for the house, and a shelf of National Geographics. In the yard was a shed where Dorothy milked the one cow. Paul wonders how they managed to eke out a living. It must have been a difficult life indeed.

One other thing we know aobut Wes is that he developed epilepsy late in life. It was successfully controlled.

Here's a little about Wes and Addie's children:

Wes and Addie's eldest child Wilbur died in 1923 soon after they moved to New Mexico. He was a beautiful talented young man just like his father. When his sister, Helen, was in her eighties, she said to me one day, "Wouldn't it have been wonderful if Wilbur had lived?" This comment tells us as much about the atmosphere in Wes and Addie's home as it does about Wilbur. Even after 70 years Helen loved him and missed him.

Wes and Addie's 2nd child Dorothy, as a young girl was very bright and talented in music and art. But she had a difficult life as an adult. Helen paid for her to go to Business School, but she couldn't keep a job. She went to Nursing School but couldn't get along with the patients. She tried raising chickens, but that didn't go well either. She lived with her parents and cared for them until they died. After that she worked in a Laundromat for a while and then retired in Rifle, Colorado. Helen visited her there several times and reported her little house was filled with boxes and piles of stuff to the point that only aisles remained. She seemed to suffer from a personality disorder that didn't show up until she was grown. We have a painting Dorothy did of the Yuccas in New Mexico. When Dawne was little, Dorothy sewed many cute clothes for her including a hand-smocked dress that was saved and worn again by Dawne's daughters. In the 1970's Dorothy wrote a number of letters to our family telling about their lives in Virginia. A copy of those letters appears in this collection of stories.


Wes and Addie's third child Philip had to quit high school and help his parents. He married a Texas woman, Ezra Edna Grimes. You can read about Ezra in her own story, which also is included here. Ezra brought an adopted daughter, Dorothy Nell, to the marriage. Philip and Ezra adopted a second child, Bruce Elmer. Philip tried farming in Missouri but that didn't go too well. Paul spent one summer with him and his family on their farm in Jasper, Missouri. Then for 25 years Philip and Ezra operated a coin laundromat in Lawrence, Kansas, an endeavor which proved more productive for them. After they retired they bought a trailer and toured the western states, making many friends and thoroughly enjoying life. They'd spend winter in Texas and go north in the spring to Idaho where they enjoyed picking wild huckleberries, and canning apricots, apples, strawberries and rhubarb. Philip was a very friendly, good humored man. His wife was six years older than he and lived to be 96. During her later years she suffered from several debilitating conditions and required much care. Philip cared for her until she died, at which time he himself was 90 years old. He was never heard to complain. Philip lived another 5 years, dying in Brownwood, Texas in 1999. Philip Love White was a good and happy man. Their daughter, Dorothy Nell, married several times, moved to California, and had six children. Their son Bruce married a girl of Mexican descent, had two children, and retired in Mexico.

Wes and Addie's fourth child Helen Frances, the youngest, is Grandpa's mother and has her own story.

Wes was born during the Civil War and lived through World War II and everything in between. As a young boy he had every advantage that an industrious, thrifty farm family that loved learning could give him. He began his adult life with a rather promising future. His family valued education and he attended college at a time when few did. He worked as a teacher and as a farmer. Teaching brought him his wife, and farming brought him some years of prosperity as a Virginia farmer. But then the health of his children forced him to leave his productive farm and spend his last 25 years ekeing out a living first in barren New Mexico and then in the poverty of southern Missouri. He was a man of education, of wisdom, energy,and ingenuity. Though he ended his life in poverty, the lessons he instilled in his children have been passed on down the line through his children and grandchildren to you dear ones.

Here's how you are related to William Wesley White. Wes married Anna Adelaide Nicklas and had Helen Frances White. Helen married Harold Balis Stevens and had Paul Robert Stevens. Paul married Dianne Irene Zimmerman and had Dawne Irene Stevens. Dawne married Jason Andrew Pamplin and had you wonderful children. William Wesley White was your great great grandfather.

Hooray for William Wesley White!

Love,
Granny


Per Wes's death certificate:
Immediate cause of death Bronchopneumonia which he had suffered with for three days.
Illness was due to chronic laryngitis, chronic __yoconditis, and arteriosclerosis.

The informant was his wife, Adie.

Anna Adelaide Nicklas:

Cause of Death: Myocarditis

Buried: Amy Cemetery, Howell County, Missouri 19

Notes:

The Anna Adelaide Nicklas Story
(20 Nov 1871 - 22 May 1951)
March 12, 2007

Dear Children,

Anna Adelaide Nicklas, called Addie for short, was the third child of Peter and Dorothy Nicklas, a German-American farm family in Georgetown, Grant County, Wisconsin. Addie was born 20 November 1871 in Georgetown. One memory of Addie's girlhood that her daughter Helen shared with us was that as a young girl she sometimes earned money making strawberry baskets which she sold for a penny each. Another memory was that once a year a singing teacher would come to town and all the neighbors would gather and sing in parts.

Addie's parents sent her to college at UW-Platteville, where she lived with her brother George and his family. Yes, that's the same school that Nana and your Uncle Danny went to. But like her sister Eva, Addie became so homesick that she had to give it up and return home. At home she became a dressmaker and seamstress along with her mother and Eva. In those days a family would have the dressmaker come every spring and every fall and make all the clothes for the whole family. Nothing was bought ready-made. But somewhere along the line of her school career, I'm not sure whether it was in high school or her brief stay in college, her teacher was the handsome young Wesley White. He was seven years older than she. They married 16 Mar 1899 in Platteville.

After the wedding they moved back to Jo Daviess County. Their four children were born there on the farm where Wes had grown up, Wilbur in 1900, Dorothy in 1902, Philip in 1906, and Helen, our Nana, in 1906. Notice how the babies are two years apart. That was the normal spacing of children until quite recently. Addie breastfed her babies as all women did, there was no reasonable alternative. The breastfeeding protected them from having another baby before the first one was well into toddlerhood. Nana described her mother as a very gentle woman who never spanked her children.

When Nana was two the family moved to Midlothian, Virginia, where Wes bought a farm with good fertile soil and the family prospered. They had a spring on that farm. Do you know what a spring is? It is a place where beautiful clear water bubbles out of the ground. There was no pipe to bring water to the kitchen so having a way to get clean water was very important. The spring was nestled down in a fern bed with its own little house built around it. The spring house served as a refrigerator to keep the milk cool on warm days. Soon they had a well with a pump to make getting clean water even easier.

We have many pictures that Wes took of the Virginia days. In addition, Addie's daughter Dorothy wrote to us about their life there. Here are a few exerpts from her letters to give you a bit of the flavor of the White's life in Virginia:
"Goats are something we had on that first Virginia place. We were glad to tell the other children at school that we had kids at home. Those goats climbed up onto the chickenhouse roof. They were quite a nuisance. . . .
"When we went to Virginia, we turned yellow, because we got malaria, there was so much woods and dampness, making a fine home for mosquitos. . . .
"I'll mention music this month. When we children were little we had a gramophone in place of what we call a record player today. It had a horn that was shaped like a morning glory flower. The records were...cylinders that fitted on to a solid cylinder. Records I remember are, ' Just a Little Attic but it's Home Sweet Home', "Ring the Bells of Heaven', 'Tell Mother I'll be There', Poke Miller's 'The Old Time Religion', and instrumentals, some by violin, flute, and harp, one 'Love and Devotion.'
We had a book of favorite songs. Many of them were by Stephen Foster. . . .
"One odd thing that I remember is that there were beautiful wild violets growing in the graveyard at the colored church. The church was next door to our one-room schoolhouse. I picked violets and worried that night because I had stepped on some graves. . . Snobbish colored people from Richmond would come to visit the folk at our local colored church and sometimes there would be shootings. As I understand it, the city people felt much superior to the country folk and expressed their feelings. . . .
"Quite a few people in Virginia were proud of having Indian blood. One family lived on the first place we had in Virginia after we moved up on the hill. One brother asked father to pull a tooth for a poor Indian. Father did. . . .
"Our mother had four children for whom she sewed, washed with a washboard, churned and canned. We helped with the canning, because our family sold canned goods. We helped with the planting of tomato plants, potatoes, beans, etc. . . .
"Mothers often got lonely in those days when the fathers were at work and the children away at school. Few had telephones. There were no radios or television sets to keep one in touch with the world."

Besides all the sewing and cooking we know that Addie always made time for flowers. Whenever Nana looked at my flowers she always told me how beautiful her mothers flowers were. I don't know if that was in Virginia, New Mexico (can you grow flowers in New Mexico?) or Missouri. We know she grew roses in Missouri because we have a picture of Addie in her roses.

After they lived in Virginia for two years, Wes built a better home "up on the hill." Now he owned two farms and rented one out. He was a prosperous Virginia farmer. And so we can understand his mixed feelings in 1923 when Addie insisted on the family moving to New Mexico.

Wilbur had been sick for several years and was getting sicker. His disease was called Consumption. Now it's called Tuberculosis. Addie was told that the Virginia climate was very bad for Wilbur and he should be in a warm dry place. Nothing was so important to Addie as her children. There was no question in her mind. She had to take Wilbur away. Addie had a cousin, William Henry Nicklas, who was a rancher in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. That is very likely the reason she picked that particular area of the warm dry southwest. Off she went with Wilbur, Philip, and Helen. Wilbur did not get better. He died in New Mexico in June of 1923. Addie told Wes she would not come back to Virginia, so he sold his nice farms and followed her. But even though it was very hard on the family financially, the move may have saved Philip and Helen who later learned they had had early TB at that time.

Addie and Wes and Dorothy, who continued to live with them, held out in New Mexico until 1935. By that time Wes was 71 years old and Addie 64. There was no Social Security in those days. People either saved enough to live on in their old age, or they moved in with their children, or they worked until they died. Wes and Addie sold their place in New Mexico and bought a new farm in South Fork, Missouri and kept working. Aunt Dorothy went too. The new place had poor rocky soil and life was no doubt quite a struggle. Wes died there in 1948 and Addie in 1951, just shy of 80 years. This is what her death certificate says about her cause of death. Cause of death was Chronic Myocarditis (inflamation of the heart muscle) which she had suffered with for five years. It was a result of 10 years of arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries). Another significant condition she suffered from was chronic cholecystitis (gall stones). She had had that condition for ten years.

You can read about Wes and Addie's children, Philip and Dorothy, in Wes's story. Helen (Nana) is our ancestor. She has her own story.

So this is our ancestor Anna Adelaide Nicklas. She came from a family of strong resourceful German women. She fell in love and married her schoolteacher. She had four children she adored. She gave up a fairly comfortable life as a Virginia farmer's wife in the effort to save her son, Wilbur. Though that effort failed, she may have inadvertently saved her other children. She and Wes lived a long struggling life as senior citizens, but she always had roses. Anna Adelaide Nicklas was a good faithful loving wife and mother. We are proud to have her as our ancestor.

Here's how you are related to Anna Adelaide Nicklas. Addie and Wes birthed Helen White. Helen and Harold Stevens birthed Paul. Paul and Dianne birthed Dawne. Dawne and Jason Pamplin birthed . . . Sarah, Hannah, Timmy, and Becky!

So Hooray for Anna Adelaide Nicklas!

Love,
Granny


Death certificate gives date of birth as 20 Nov 1872
The informant of the death was her daughter, Dorothy White.

(01) Wilbur L. White:

Notes:

Wilbur died in 1923 soon after they moved to New Mexico. He was a beautiful talented young man just like his father. When his sister, Helen, was in her eighties, she said to me one day, "Wouldn't it have been wonderful if Wilbur had lived?" This comment tells us as much about the atmosphere in Wes and Adie's home as it does about Wilbur. Even after 70 years Helen loved him and missed him.

(02) Dorothy Ellen White:

Notes:

Dorothy, as a young girl was very bright and talented in music and art. But she had a difficult life as an adult. Helen paid for her to go to Business School, but she couldn't keep a job. She went to Nursing School but couldn't get along with the patients. She tried raising chickens, but that didn't go well either. She lived with her parents until they died. After that she worked in a Laundromat for a while and then retired in Rifle, Colorado. Helen visited her there several times and reported her little house was filled with boxes and piles of stuff to the point that only aisles remained. She seemed to suffer from a personality disorder that didn't show up until she was grown. We have a painting Dorothy did of the Yuccas in New Mexico. When Dawne was little, Dorothy sewed many cute clothes for her including a hand-smocked dress that was saved and worn again by Dawne's daughters.

Footnotes
  1. White, Helen Frances- Notes from Personal Interview by Dianne Z. Stevens.
  2. White, Addie - Photo Album.
  3. Census, Federal - 1920 - Chesterfield Co., VA, twnsp of Midlothian - ED# 17, sheet 12, Sheet 12 A & B; Ancestry p. 23 & 24 of 26.
    (31 Jan 1920)

    line 49

    White, Wesley W head own mort age 55 yrs IL IL Isle of Mann, Eng General Farmer
    Anne A. wife 47 WI Pa Germany
    Wilbur L. son 19 IL IL WI
    Dorothy E dau 18 same Artist working for wage at painting and
    Ingraving shop

    Philip L. son 16 "
    Helen F. dau 13 "

  4. Census, Federal - 1870 - Jo Daviess Co., Illinois, Apple River, Ancestry p. 10 of 28.

    Line 10 Dwelling # 1727 Family # 1781

    Andrew White age 50 male Farmer value real est. - $1000 born Ireland
    Matilda " 43 f "
    William L. " 11 m Ills
    Samuel D. " 9 m "
    Martha J. " 8 f "
    Mary " 6 f "
    Ann E. " 4 f "
    John Fitzpatrick 24? m " Ireland

  5. Census, Federal - 1900 - Jo Daviess Co., Illinois, Rush Twsp, ED 41, Ancestry p. 14 of 19.

    line 84 dwelling house # 151 family # 182

    White, Wesley, head 36 occupation farmer
    White, Addie wife 27
    White, Wilbur son 8/12 (should be 3/12)

    line 87 dwelling #151 family # 183

    Nicklas, Peter head 65 occupation retired
    Nicklas, Dorthea wife 58
    Nicklas, Evilina dau 33

  6. Census, Federal - 1910 - Chesterfield Co., Virginia, Midlothian, ED # 12, Ancestry p. 13 of 24.

    line 33; Dwelling # 145, Family # 145

    White, Wesley age 44 married 11 yrs - Farmer
    Adalaid 37 11 4 children born 4 children living
    Wilber 10
    Dorothy 8
    Philip 7
    Helen 4

  7. Census, Federal - 1930 - Dona Ana Co., New Mexico, La Mesa, ED # 13, Ancestry p. 8 of 36.

    Line 79; dwelling # 73; Family # 75

    White, Wesley W. - home is owned, value $350 65 yrs old - age at 1st marriage 34 - Farmer
    Addie 57 26
    Philipp 26 - Farm Laborer
    Dorothy 28 - *Stenographer at a furniture store
    Helen 24 - Public school Teacher

    *Dorothy indicates she has been unemployed for 3 months.

  8. Dianne Z. Stevens, White Family History.
  9. William Wesley White Death Certificate (Missouri Division of Health, courtesy of Missouri State Archives, p.o. Box 1747, Jefferson City, MO 65102), file # 39980.
    (30 Dec 1948)
  10. Sophia Nicklas Driskill, Nicklas Family History (copied & dispersed by the author, Yukon, OK 6/18/1986), Nicklas.
  11. Dianne Z. Stevens, White Family History.
  12. Nicklas, Anna Adelaide - Family Photo Album.
  13. Census, Federal - 1900 - Jo Daviess Co., Illinois, Rush Twsp, ED 41, Ancestry p. 14 of 19.

    Census, Federal - 1900 - Jo Daviess Co., Illinois, Rush Twsp, ED 41, Ancestry p. 14 of 19.
    "line 84 dwelling house # 151 family # 182

    White, Wesley, head 36 occupation farmer
    White, Addie wife 27
    White, Wilbur son 8/12 (should be 3/12)

    line 87 dwelling #151 family # 183

    Nicklas, Peter head 65 occupation retired
    Nicklas, Dorthea wife 58
    Nicklas, Evilina dau 33."

  14. Census, Federal - 1910 - Chesterfield Co., Virginia, Midlothian, ED # 12, Ancestry p. 13 of 24.

    line 33; Dwelling # 145, Family # 145

    White, Wesley age 44 married 11 yrs - Farmer
    Adalaid 37 11 4 children born 4 children living
    Wilber 10
    Dorothy 8
    Philip 7
    Helen 4

  15. Census, Federal - 1930 - Dona Ana Co., New Mexico, La Mesa, ED # 13, Ancestry p. 8 of 32.

    Line 79; dwelling # 73; Family # 75

    White, Wesley W. - home is owned, value $350 65 yrs old - age at 1st marriage 34 - Farmer
    Addie 57 26
    Philipp 26 - Farm Laborer
    Dorothy 28 - *Stenographer at a furniture store
    Helen 24 - Public school Teacher

    *Dorothy indicates she has been unemployed for 3 months.

  16. Census, Federal - 1880 - Grant Co, WI, Smelser, Ancestry p. 23 of 26.

    Line 1

    Nicholes, Peter age 45 Farmer b. Penn f.b. Hesse Darmstadt m. b. Hesse Darmstadt
    Dorothy 39 wife Hanover Hanover Hanover
    George L. 17 son - works on farm WI PA "
    Evlina 13 dau " " "
    Anna 8 dau " " "

  17. Census, Federal - 1920 - Chesterfield Co., VA, twnsp of Midlothian - ED# 17, sheet 12, Sheet 12 A & B; Ancestry p. 23 & 24 of 26.

    line 49

    White, Wesley W head own mort age 55 yrs IL IL Isle of Mann, Eng General Farmer
    Anne A. wife 47 WI Pa Germany
    Wilbur L. son 19 IL IL WI
    Dorothy E dau 18 same Artist working for wage at painting and
    Ingraving shop

    Philip L. son 16 "
    Helen F. dau 13 "

  18. Anna Adelaide White Death Certificate (The Division of Health of the State of Missouri), state file # 16363.
    (15 Jun 1951)
  19. Ibid.

    [Date of death given is 22 May 1951

    Date of burial given is 18 May 1951]

  20. Census, Federal - 1920 - Chesterfield Co., VA, twnsp of Midlothian - ED# 17, sheet 12, Sheet 12 A & B; Ancestry p. 23 & 24 of 26.

    line 49

    White, Wesley W head own mort age 55 yrs IL IL Isle of Mann, Eng General Farmer
    Anne A. wife 47 WI Pa Germany
    Wilbur L. son 19 IL IL WI
    Dorothy E dau 18 same Artist working for wage at painting and
    Ingraving shop

    Philip L. son 16 "
    Helen F. dau 13 "

  21. Dianne Z. Stevens, White Family History.
  22. Census, Federal - 1900 - Jo Daviess Co., Illinois, Rush Twsp, ED 41, Ancestry p. 14 of 19.

    Census, Federal - 1900 - Jo Daviess Co., Illinois, Rush Twsp, ED 41, Ancestry p. 14 of 19.
    "line 84 dwelling house # 151 family # 182

    White, Wesley, head 36 occupation farmer
    White, Addie wife 27
    White, Wilbur son 8/12 (should be 3/12)

    line 87 dwelling #151 family # 183

    Nicklas, Peter head 65 occupation retired
    Nicklas, Dorthea wife 58
    Nicklas, Evilina dau 33."

  23. Census, Federal - 1910 - Chesterfield Co., Virginia, Midlothian, ED # 12, Ancestry p. 13 of 24.

    line 33; Dwelling # 145, Family # 145

    White, Wesley age 44 married 11 yrs - Farmer
    Adalaid 37 11 4 children born 4 children living
    Wilber 10
    Dorothy 8
    Philip 7
    Helen 4

  24. Dorothy E. White, White, Dorothy E. - Letters to P&D Stevens Family.
    (1976/1978)

    [This is a series of 8 letters written between January 1976 and July 1978 describing various aspects of life when Dorothy was a young girl. Included here are excerpts.]

  25. Dianne Z. Stevens, White Family History.
  26. Census, Federal - 1920 - Chesterfield Co., VA, twnsp of Midlothian - ED# 17, sheet 12, Sheet 12 A & B; Ancestry p. 23 & 24 of 26.

    line 49

    White, Wesley W head own mort age 55 yrs IL IL Isle of Mann, Eng General Farmer
    Anne A. wife 47 WI Pa Germany
    Wilbur L. son 19 IL IL WI
    Dorothy E dau 18 same Artist working for wage at painting and
    Ingraving shop

    Philip L. son 16 "
    Helen F. dau 13 "

  27. Census, Federal - 1910 - Chesterfield Co., Virginia, Midlothian, ED # 12, Ancestry p. 13 of 24.

    line 33; Dwelling # 145, Family # 145

    White, Wesley age 44 married 11 yrs - Farmer
    Adalaid 37 11 4 children born 4 children living
    Wilber 10
    Dorothy 8
    Philip 7
    Helen 4

  28. Census, Federal - 1930 - Dona Ana Co., New Mexico, La Mesa, ED # 13, Ancestry p. 8 of 36.

    Line 79; dwelling # 73; Family # 75

    White, Wesley W. - home is owned, value $350 65 yrs old - age at 1st marriage 34 - Farmer
    Addie 57 26
    Philipp 26 - Farm Laborer
    Dorothy 28 - *Stenographer at a furniture store
    Helen 24 - Public school Teacher

    *Dorothy indicates she has been unemployed for 3 months.

  29. Census, Federal - 1920 - Chesterfield Co., VA, twnsp of Midlothian - ED# 17, sheet 12, Sheet 12 A & B; Ancestry p. 23 & 24 of 26.

    line 49

    White, Wesley W head own mort age 55 yrs IL IL Isle of Mann, Eng General Farmer
    Anne A. wife 47 WI Pa Germany
    Wilbur L. son 19 IL IL WI
    Dorothy E dau 18 same Artist working for wage at painting and
    Ingraving shop

    Philip L. son 16 "
    Helen F. dau 13 "

  30. Dianne Z. Stevens, White Family History.
  31. Census, Federal - 1910 - Chesterfield Co., Virginia, Midlothian, ED # 12, Ancestry p. 13 of 24.

    line 33; Dwelling # 145, Family # 145

    White, Wesley age 44 married 11 yrs - Farmer
    Adalaid 37 11 4 children born 4 children living
    Wilber 10
    Dorothy 8
    Philip 7
    Helen 4

  32. Census, Federal - 1930 - Dona Ana Co., New Mexico, La Mesa, ED # 13, Ancestry p. 8 of 36.

    Line 79; dwelling # 73; Family # 75

    White, Wesley W. - home is owned, value $350 65 yrs old - age at 1st marriage 34 - Farmer
    Addie 57 26
    Philipp 26 - Farm Laborer
    Dorothy 28 - *Stenographer at a furniture store
    Helen 24 - Public school Teacher

    *Dorothy indicates she has been unemployed for 3 months.

  33. Ancestry.com, Texas birth index.

    ["Love" as Philips middle name comes from entries on this index for his two children.]

  34. Dorothy E. White, White, Dorothy E. - Letters to P&D Stevens Family, Sheet 12 A & B; Ancestry p. 23 & 24 of 26.
  35. Census, Federal - 1910 - Chesterfield Co., Virginia, Midlothian, ED # 12, Ancestry p. 13 of 24.

    line 33; Dwelling # 145, Family # 145

    White, Wesley age 44 married 11 yrs - Farmer
    Adalaid 37 11 4 children born 4 children living
    Wilber 10
    Dorothy 8
    Philip 7
    Helen 4

  36. Census, Federal - 1920 - Chesterfield Co., VA, twnsp of Midlothian - ED# 17, sheet 12, Ancestry p. 23 of 26.

    line 49

    White, Wesley W head own mort age 55 yrs IL IL Isle of Mann, Eng General Farmer
    Anne A. wife 47 WI Pa Germany
    Wilbur L. son 19 IL IL WI
    Dorothy E dau 18 same Artist working for wage at painting and
    Ingraving shop

    Philip L. son 16 "
    Helen F. dau 13 "

  37. Census, Federal - 1930 - Dona Ana Co., New Mexico, La Mesa, ED # 13, Ancestry p. 8 of 36.

    Line 79; dwelling # 73; Family # 75

    White, Wesley W. - home is owned, value $350 65 yrs old - age at 1st marriage 34 - Farmer
    Addie 57 26
    Philipp 26 - Farm Laborer
    Dorothy 28 - *Stenographer at a furniture store
    Helen 24 - Public school Teacher

    *Dorothy indicates she has been unemployed for 3 months.

  38. Census, Federal 1940, Waukegan, Lake, Illinois.

    Name: Helen Stevens
    Age: 29
    Estimated Birth Year: abt 1911
    Gender: Female
    Race: White
    Birthplace: Illinois
    Marital status: Married
    Relation to Head of House: Wife
    Home in 1940: Waukegan, Lake, Illinois
    Map of Home in 1940: View Map
    Street: Sherman Pl
    House Number: 204
    Inferred Residence in 1935: Waukegan, Lake, Illinois
    Residence in 1935: Same Place
    Resident on farm in 1935: No
    Sheet Number: 2A
    Attended School or College: No
    Highest Grade Completed: College, 3rd year
    Weeks Worked in 1939: 0
    Income: 0
    Income Other Sources: Yes
    Neighbors: View others on page
    Household Members: Name Age
    Harold Stevens 31
    Helen Stevens 29

  39. Grant Co, WI - WI marriages 1835-1900.
Surnames | Index

Revised: November 26, 2016